The CBZ Newswire

Hard Punching Headlines Hitz Fight Night at the Horseshoe in a Night of Knockouts

by on Jun.21, 2014, under Boxing News, Guest Columnists

Report by Kerstin Broockmann
Photos by Scott Dray

Dimar Ortuz (L) on his way to dismantling Daniel Adotey Allotey

Dimar Ortuz (L) on his way to dismantling Daniel Adotey Allotey

HAMMOND, IN, June 20, 2014 — Though lacking a “name” headliner (Donovan George, who had been scheduled to headline, had to withdraw), Hitz Boxing’s Fight Night at the Venue at the Horseshoe Casino still featured some entertaining scraps as local boxers practiced their craft and faced some live opponents. Simon Buettner won a controversial Majority Decision over William Chouloute in a boxer/brawler matchup that tested both. Russell Fiore didn’t have much time to demonstrate his evolving style as he systematically dismantled Tim Carrizales before stopping him in the second. Will Coix weathered an early onslaught from the game but overmatched Thomas Amaro to dominate their battle en route to a TKO in the third. Antoine Knight showed more grit than he should have as Adan Ortiz proved his mettle at Featherweight with a technically proficient, explosive performance, showing that he could take some heavy shots as well as dishing them out as he scored a fourth round TKO. Heavyweight James Shorter took Nick Asberry into deep water, throwing punishing hooks from inside until the bigger Asberry finally found a way to keep his opponent at the end of his punches and finish him in the fourth. Frank Scalise landed a vicious left hook at will until he put away the hapless Justin Gauthier at the end of the first round. Headliner Dimar Ortuz broke down the heavy-handed but sluggish Ghanaian Daniel Adotey Allotey, never giving his bigger opponent the opportunity to launch a counter-offense until Allotey retired at the top of the fifth.

William Chouloute (R) avoids an attack by Simon Buettner (L)

William Chouloute (R) avoids an attack by Simon Buettner (L)

Opening the evening, Carpentersville, Illinois Light Heavyweight Simon “The Punisher” Buettner (6-1, 3 KOs, 176.75 lbs.) faced Chicagoan William “Shotgun” Chouloute (1-4, 1 KO, 172.25 lbs). Though both boxers started tentatively, Chouloute was the first to pull the trigger, working behind a stiff jab. In the middle of the round, Buettner started finding his rhythm and his power, shifting effectively into hooks from the outside that, though wide, usually found their mark on Chouloute’s head and body to take the round.

Buettner (R) goes to the body of Chouloute

Buettner (R) goes to the body of Chouloute

The second round saw some back and forth action, as Buettner tried to continue the punishment he had started to inflict in the first, only to find a more active and elusive opponent. Chouloute moved and countered Buettner’s lunging attacks, sticking his straight punches and mixing in some effective hooks to the head as well to decisively take this round.

Buettner (L) charges at Chouloute

Buettner (L) charges at Chouloute

In the third, Chouloute found the center line open, and effectively outpunched and outpowered Buettner at the top of the round, bloodying Buettner’s nose with powerful straight punches. As Chouloute tired, Buettner took advantage of his looser guard to redouble his attack with hooks to the head and body. It was hard to call who got the better of the exchanges, as both boxers slowed to single punches, and Buettner relied heavily on holding to ward off Chouloute’s attack.

Chouloute (L) fires over Buettner's guard

Chouloute (L) fires over Buettner’s guard

In the fourth and final round, Buettner came on looking to finish the fight at the outset, but, having failed to do so, once again tried to avoid retaliation by holding and then winging hooks. Chouloute could not mount a consistent attack, but moved well to avoid most of Buettner’s heavy leather, and again landed some impressive straight shots. On the final cards, it may have been Buettner’s power that took the day, as he was awarded the Majority Decision with scores of 38-38 (with which this writer concurs) once, and 39-37 twice.

Russell Fiore (L) enjoys the first knockdown of his bout against Tim Carrizale

Russell Fiore (L) enjoys the first knockdown of his bout against Tim Carrizale

Chicagoan Russell “Rocky” Fiore (12-2-1, 8 KOs, 135.5 lbs.) showed off a more mature style, waiting for the right moment to overwhelm Tim “Tuff-T” Carrizales (4-12-1, 3 KOs, 135.5) of Waukesha, Wisconsin at Lightweight. Carrizales looked jumpy and tentative at the outset, and Fiore soon capitalized with hooks to the body and head. Having survived a few punches, Carrizales settled in and threw some solid shots of his own. Finding an opening, Fiore launched a two-fisted attack that drove Carrizales back and floored him with a looping right hand. Carrizales was up again in a moment and on the attack, landing a few sharp shots, but not enough to turn the tide, and Fiore finished strong with another combination before the bell. The second round started on more even terms, with Carrizales throwing some smooth combinations, but it was Fiore who was the aggressor. Once again finding the opportunity to go on the attack, it was another overhand right that signaled the end of the bout, sending Carrizales down again. Though he struggled to his feet, he was clearly not able to continue, and the bout was called at 1:14 of the round, giving Fiore his eighth KO.

Thomas Amaro (R) starts strong against Will Coix

Thomas Amaro (R) starts strong against Will Coix

West Chicago’s Will “Power” Coix (2-0, 2KOs, 145.75 lbs.) tested his power against the more experienced Thomas Amaro (2-6, 2 KOs, 145.75 lbs.) of Holland, Michigan in a Welterweight bout. Amaro showed his experience by coming on strong and taking the fight to Coix, who looked unharmed despite taking a number of hard straight shots and hooks to the head and body. Coix waited until the final third of the first round to take out his frustrations on Thomas, unleashing a torrent of punches and not letting Thomas off the hook, driving him to the ropes and backing him into a corner before sending him down with a barrage of straight punches. Amaro opted to continue after the count, but the bell stopped the action.

Coix (L) drives forward against Thomas Amaro

Coix (L) drives forward against Thomas Amaro

Amaro looked to have recovered at the top of the second, but Coix clearly had his number. Though Amaro landed some decent shots, Coix kept a steady attack. Once again driving Amaro back with a combination of punches from all angles, this time it was a left hook to the body that dropped Amaro. Amaro beat the count and tried to re-engage, but Coix kept working his left hook to body, followed by uppercuts or hooks to head, and a volley of straight shots sent Amaro to his knees again. Shortly after the action resumed, Coix landed another clean left hook to the body, sending Amaro down for the third time in the round. The determined Amaro once again beat the count, and was saved by the bell.

Coix (L) pelts Amaro with a hail of punches near the end of the bout

Coix (L) pelts Amaro with a hail of punches near the end of the bout

Coix started the third round, picking up where he had left off, throwing combinations that kept Amaro from mounting any offense. A jab to chin had Amaro reeling, and a final jab/right hook to head to the head dropped Amaro for the last time, though he argued the call, as Referee Curt Spivey waved off the bout at :48 of the third to give Coix the TKO win against a very game opponent. Coix displayed impressive poise, footwork and combination punching in his second victory.

Adan Ortiz (R) keeps the pressure on Antoine Knight

Adan Ortiz (R) keeps the pressure on Antoine Knight

Sterling, Illinois’s Adan Ortiz (7-0, 6 KOs, 124 lbs.) moved up to test his knockout ability at Featherweight against the tough-as-nails Antoine “D-1” Knight (3-8, 1 KO, 125 lbs.) of Merriville, Indiana. Though Knight was eager to mix it up, and launched several solid attacks as well as both showing off some impressive evasive head movement and footwork, Ortiz was able to take the first round with his speed and counterpunching.

316Ortiz showed a varied attack, landing thudding blows to the body followed by powerful head shots. Ortiz continued dominating in the second round, driving Knight into the corner. It seemed that Knight might simply be too strong, as he took a fusillade of punches and never found a way to stay on the attack, but hurt Ortiz near the end of the round with wide but powerful hooks to the head.

Knight (R) topples after an uppercut from Ortiz

Knight (R) topples after an uppercut from Ortiz

It looked like Knight may have found the way to beat Ortiz with some well-placed, hammering hooks to the head that landed at the top of the third round, but Ortiz soon reestablished his range, moving in and out to land punishing combinations to Knight’s body and head. It seemed Ortiz might put Knight out, as he backed him into the corner, raking his body with hooks and uppercuts, and clearly rocking his tough opponent, who nevertheless managed to escape, only to be knocked down by a powerful uppercut. Again, Knight got up and tried to land his own knockout punch, but Ortiz landed a left uppercut/right hook/left uppercut combination and just kept on the attack until the sound of the bell.

Knight (L) tries to stop an attack from Ortiz

Knight (L) tries to stop an attack from Ortiz

Knight had not fully recovered from the third round, but was determined to take the fight to Ortiz in the fourth. Ortiz was having none of it, and went on the attack with brutal body shots and forceful blows to the head. Knight’s corner made the right choice in ending the punishment, and the bout was called off at :59, giving Ortiz the TKO. Though Knight showed great heart, he probably took more punishment than he should have been allowed to take against the technically dominant and powerful Ortiz.

Light Heavyweight Sam Horowitz was denied his chance at his pro debut when his scheduled opponent, Warren Snapp, declined the challenge.

Nick Asberry (R) finds himself pinned against the ropes by the hard-charging James Shorter

Nick Asberry (R) finds himself pinned against the ropes by the hard-charging James Shorter

In a cross-border scuffle, Heavyweight Nick “The Terror” Asberry (5-0, 2 KOs, 238 lbs.) successfully kept his record unblemished against the powerful “Gentleman” James Shorter (4-3, 3 KOs, 216.5 lbs.) of Elkhart, Indiana. Shorter was the more successful in the first round, coming inside and preventing Asberry from establishing his range while attacking with powerful hooks that earned him a standing eight against his taller opponent.

Asberry (L) eludes Shorter and looks to turn the tables

Asberry (L) eludes Shorter and looks to turn the tables

In the second, Asberry was more successful at finding his distance, as well as incorporating some effective body punching. Shorter kept up the pressure, though, and once again rocked Asberry with a left hook to the head. It was a close round, with both fighters landing some huge shots.

Asberry (R) on the attack

Asberry (R) on the attack

In the third, Asberry got off to stronger start, though Shorter again landed a few thudding hooks. This time, Asberry returned fire in kind, attacking the head and body of Shorter. Shorter looked dazed in the second half of the round, wading in and taking punches in order to land a few wide hooks. Asberry owned the round.

Asberry (L) looks for the finish

Asberry (L) looks for the finish

In the final round, Asberry wasted no time in backing Shorter into a corner and launching an attack to head and body. Shorter escaped and tried to attack, but a left hook from Asberry sent him stumbling to his knees. Shorter got up and came under a body attack from Asberry. Once again escaping, Shorter attacked and got caught by a left hook followed by a volley of punches that seemed to stagger him. Not giving up, he again pursued Asberry with looping hooks. Asberry stopped him short with an uppercut and a combination ending with left hook that had Shorter careening backwards. Seeing that Shorter was in no state to continue, Referee Curt Spivey wisely ended the bout at 2:06 of the fourth, giving Asberry the hard-won TKO victory.

Frank Scalise (R) looks for the right opening against Justin Gauthier

Frank Scalise (R) looks for the right opening against Justin Gauthier

Bridgeport, Chicago’s Frank “Time Bomb” Scalise (8-1, 8 KOs, 137 lbs.) made short work of Waukesha, Wisconsin’s Justin Gauthier (0-5, 140 lbs.) in a Light Welterweight contest scheduled for four rounds. Raking Gauthier with hooks to the body and straight shots up the center, it didn’t take long for Scalise to drop Gauthier with a left hook to the body. Gauthier returned to the action, and Scalise continued the punishment, landing another left hook to the body with the same result. Gauthier once again beat the count, and returned for more punishment. This time it was a left hook to head to that sent Gauthier to the canvas, though he insisted on continuing. When another left hook to body again sent Gauthier to his knees, the referee had seen enough and stopped postponing the inevitable, giving Scalise the win by TKO at 2:49 of the first round.

Dimar Ortuz (L) takes control against Daniel Adotey Allotey

Dimar Ortuz (L) takes control against Daniel Adotey Allotey

Chicago Cruiserweight Dimar “El Animal” Ortuz (9-0-1, 6 KOs, 199.75 lbs.) showed poise and patience in demolishing Daniel Adotey Allotey (15-6, 8 KOs, 209.75 lbs.) of Accra, Ghana. Feinting his way inside, southpaw Ortuz initiated the action in the first round with two-fisted body attack. Easily slipping Allotey’s punches, Ortuz patiently stalked his bigger opponent, who leaned against the ropes and took barrages of punches on his close guard, apparently waiting for later rounds to attack.

Ortuz (L) thinks about his next attack

Ortuz (L) thinks about his next attack

Allotey was more active from outset of the second round, though when Ortuz went on the attack, he again hid behind a close guard. Mid-round, Ortuz found a home for his right hook, rocking Allotey. Allotey tried to fight back, but took a knee after he threw a punch, perhaps indicating an injury.

Allotey (R) unwisely leaves himself open to an attack from Ortuz

Allotey (R) unwisely leaves himself open to an attack from Ortuz

Allotey came out in a right lead in the third, matching Ortuz not only in leads but in punching. Soon, Ortuz was once again dominating, though Allotey continued to land occasional powerful shots from both hands.

Allotey (R) mounts a final defense

Allotey (R) mounts a final defense

In the fourth, Allotey showed some good body punching ability, but Ortuz once again attacked, driving Allotey to the ropes, where Allotey resorted so frequently to putting Ortuz in a headlock that he drew a warning from referee Curt Spivey. Finding himself once again against the ropes near the bell, Allotey tried a different and more effective strategy as he tried to punch his way off the ropes when Ortuz threw thrilling combinations to head and body, ending the round with an exciting showdown. After being outpunched for four rounds (and possibly hurt, though there was no visible sign of injury), Allotey opted not to return for the fifth, giving Ortuz the TKO by retirement.

Once again, the scrappy contenders and hopefuls from the Midwest put on a good show, whether they were showing off retooled techniques or overcoming rough edges yet to be refined in the gym.

Russell Fiore celebrates his victory

Russell Fiore celebrates his victory

Adan Ortiz enjoys his stoppage victory over the disappointed Antoine Knight

Adan Ortiz enjoys his stoppage victory over the disappointed Antoine Knight

 

Nick Asberry celebrates a hard-earned victory against James Shorter

Nick Asberry celebrates a hard-earned victory against James Shorter

Dimar Ortuz enjoys his victory

Dimar Ortuz enjoys his victory

 

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