The CBZ Newswire

Adama Dominates Hernandez & Wins Crown, Estrada Stops Gonzalez

by on Dec.18, 2010, under Boxing News, Juan Ayllon

By Juan C. Ayllon

Photos by Belle

Adama (left) fires a looping right as he and Hernandez mix it up in a thrilling bout.

Adama (left) fires a looping right as he and Hernandez mix it up in a thrilling bout.

CHICAGO, December 17, 2010 – The last time Osumanu Adama fought here at the UIC Pavilion, he lost a very close decision to hometown favorite Donovan “Da Bomb” George.  This time, it wasn’t close, as he took on rugged, but faded middleweight veteran Angel “El Torro” Hernandez in a scintillating 12 round battle.

Hailing from Accra, Ghana but now based out of Joliet, Illinois’ Osumanu Adama (159.5 lbs., 17-2, 13 KO’s) faced in Chicago’s Angel “El Torro” Hernandez a grizzled, face-first slugging veteran who had gone the distance with the once vaunted and oft-avoided Ronald “Winky” Wright fighting for the latter’s International Boxing Federation Junior Middleweight title.  But that was in November 2003, some eight years and six pounds lighter ago.  He’d developed a bit of a reputation as a dangerous, plodding but sometimes erratic spoiler, erasing the “0” for then undefeated middleweight prospect Louis Turner in October 2007 and more recently garnering a unanimous decision over rising celebrity’s son prospect James McGirt in January 2009, yet he was stopped in yet another war against Peter Manfredo, Jr. for the vacant International Boxing Organization’s middleweight title in May. 

Once again fighting for the vacant IBO middleweight title, at 30-8 and 17 knockouts, waiting for the first round to start, Hernandez looks shopworn and soft around the midsection at 5’ 8” and 160 lbs.  Standing across the ring at 5’ 11”, Adama (159.5 lbs., 17-2, 13 KO’s), he looks much taller and extremely fit.

Gloves held high, Adama is jabbing and throwing the occasional feint in round one.  A glancing left sends an off-balance Hernandez careening into a corner.  Adama jumps in with a withering fusillade.  The crowd cheers.  Yet, the bull necked Hernandez is fine. In fact, he digs in, plodding forward throwing looping, ponderous punches.  And then he retreats as hard jabs follow.  Adama lands a particularly hard jab to the chin and circles out at rounds end.

Adama (left) and Hernandez trade in close.

Adama (left) and Hernandez trade in close.

Adama maintains a high guard in the second, pumps the jab and advances.  Suddenly, Hernandez springs in and jars with a left to the head, then a right.  Now, it’s Adama who’s retreating.  The two trade in close.  Adama bounces a right off Hernandez’ jaw as the two trade in close.  Hernandez holds and then proceeds to bull and bludgeon his way in close behind looping overhand rights and hooks in search of that knockout blow.

Hernandez (foreground) fires a looping right hook as Adama tries his best to fend him off.

Hernandez (foreground) fires a looping right hook as Adama tries his best to fend him off.

“Angel, go back downstairs!” someone shouts.  Adama pops the jab, pulls back from a scorching hook that just misses, flurries and takes a series of thumping hooks to the abdomen.  He looks distressed.  Gone is the appearance of sublime confidence.

Hernandez (right) launches a right hook as referee Celestino Ruiz looks on.

Hernandez (right) launches a right hook as referee Celestino Ruiz looks on.

Their strategies are crystal clear in the third:  Adama is trying to keep the fight at longer range, while Hernandez is forcing close exchanges.  Pouncing on an opening, Adama bounces hard lefts and rights off Hernadez’ beefy skull, stunning him.  Moments later, the tables turn as Hernandez drives him back with a thudding right to the head.  They take a short breather and then Adama jumps in with a smacking sidearm left hook high on the ribs.  Reestablishing the jab, he reasserts his dominance.

Hernandez (left) and Adama swap blows along the ropes as referee Celestino Ruiz observes.

Hernandez (left) and Adama swap blows along the ropes as referee Celestino Ruiz observes.

It’s now the fourth round and the rhythm of the fight emerges.  Adama asserts his jab, circles, and rips hard, single right hooks to Hernandez’s side and, intermittently, Hernandez dives back in with several punishing blows to the body and head.  Jab-jab-hook goes Adama.

Hernandez (right) finds the going rough here.

Hernandez (right) finds the going rough here.

Moments into the fifth, Adama bounces a chopping right upside Hernandez’ head, only to be bulled back by thumping blows in close.  Up on his toes again, Adama bounces back in with lefts and rights crashing onto Hernandez’ head.  The frequency of blows rises to a crescendo.  Hernandez is hurt now from a series of lefts and rights crashing into his head, but instinct keeps him ducking and weaving just enough to avoid a finishing blow and clear his head.  He retaliates with a thudding big right of his own.  A couple whistling rights jar Adama and send him skittering back a step.  He circles out and, moments later, spears with a pair of crisp jabs to the head.

The fresher of the two, Adama bounces on is toes and continues to land a pesky, hurtful jab that has Hernandez flinching in the sixth.  Jab-jab-hook – only this time Adama bounces the hook off Hernandez’s head.  The crowd roars as Adama suddenly drives him into a corner behind sharp power punches.  Hernandez is not hurt, though, and waves him in.  Moments later, he repels Adama with ponderous, larruping rights and lefts.  Not yet, son.  Not just yet.

Hernandez (left) crowds in close as Adama peppers with counters up top.

Hernandez (left) crowds in close as Adama peppers with counters up top.

Adama caps off a four-punch volley with a hurtful, penetrating right to the solar plexus early in the seventh.  The old pro seemingly shrugs it off, but it clearly troubles him.  Adama circles, shimmies his shoulders, and unloads a steady stream of jabs, hooks and sharp rights on his stubbier adversary.  Hernandez drives home a thudding right to the head or body here, or a looping left to the head there, but he’s taking way more than he’s giving.  A collective “ooh” rises from the crowd as Hernandez jars with a left that seems a bit to the back of the head of Adama, who looks to the ref in silent protest to no avail.

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In the eighth, a heavy, slapping left hook bounces off the side of Hernandez’ head, drawing a large gasp from the crowd.  Adama is boxing Hernandez’ ears off, but so far is unable to squelch the momentary threat of violent outbursts that Hernandez rains in every so often.  He’s just finding a way to live with it and strengthen his case with the judges.

Adama (right) bangs away at Hernandez.

Adama (right) bangs away at Hernandez.

It’s the ninth now, and Hernandez is doing just enough to lose with stalwart bravado, as the boxing lesson continues.

Hernandez is wrestling and bulling his way in, trying to mount a rally in the tenth.  Backing off, Adama gathers himself.  Stepping forward like an expert fencer, he clubs with hurtful fists.

Adama (left) follows through on a hardy assault.

Adama (left) follows through on a hardy assault.

Hernandez falls following a left.  Referee Celestino Ruiz rules it a slip.  Indignant, a ringsider says, “That was a knockdown – a punch landed and he went down!”  Regardless, this lights a fire under Hernandez.  Diving in with both fists pumping, he punishes Adama’s ribs and thumps upstairs.  The two swap furious blows in close.

Adama (right) batters away with lefts and rights.

Adama (right) batters away with lefts and rights.

The blows rain down in the eleventh.  A right uppercut stuns Hernandez.  His head bobs to and fro.  He bounces back against the ropes and shifts with scary ease from fog to clarity, absorbing horrific blows one second, grabbing another, and knocking back his antagonist with thudding lefts and rights.  A searing right to the chin draws a “whoah” and laughter from Hernandez.  “Nice punch,” he seems to say.  Nice punch.  Shrugging, he marches forward for more.

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There’s a redness and swelling around both eyes, but Hernandez appears very alert, willing and able in the twelfth and final round.  He’s losing, but he’s resolute.  He’s a fighter through and through, and this is what he loves to do.  What else is there?  Blocking some, absorbing others, he weathers the punches and seeks to engage his retreating and circling adversary who knows he has this fight won.  Smiling like a pitcher who just won the little league baseball World Series, Adama runs several victory laps around the ring, with Hernandez plodding after him.  This is his night and no one can take it from him.  He settles in, obliges Hernandez and trades a few punches.  The final bell tolls moments later.  There’s no mystery, here:  Judges score the bout 119-109, and 120-108 twice for Adama, who wins the IBO middleweight title.

Estrada fires the left hook at Gonzalez, who covers up.

Estrada fires the left hook at Gonzalez, who covers up.

It took several rounds, but Chicago’s “King” David Estrada (154 lbs., 24-6, 15 KO’s) shed some ring rust in taking out Manhattan, New York’s Franklin Gonzalez (13-6, 9 KO’s) in a crowd-pleaser.

In a cautious, feeling out first round, Estrada stalks, jabs and hooks the slighter built lefty, Gonzalez, who circles, ducks low and tosses ineffectual counters.

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Estrada seems to struggle with his timing in the opening minutes of round two, missing some hooks as Gonzalez ducks low.  However, turning up the pressure, he finds Gonzalez’ jaw and sides with hooks in close. The crowd comes alive with lusty cheers and scattered shouts of “David!”  Davis counters, is up on his toes, and covers up as Estrada fires off a four-punch volley to his sides.

Estrada (right) eats a right jab from Gonzalez.

Estrada (right) eats a right jab from Gonzalez.

Gonzalez bounces a pair of straight lefts off Estrada’s face in the third, but it later countered with another four-punch volley to the body.  Gonzalez jabs.  Estrada bangs the body hard.  The two trade blows in close.  Estrada is now warmed-up, thumping the body hard.  Gonzalez bounces a straight left off his face and the bell rings ending the round.

Estrada (left) recoils from a right swing by Gonzalez.

Estrada (left) recoils from a right swing by Gonzalez.

“Move to your left, David,” a ringside friend cautions Estrada away from Gonzalez’ power punch in the fourth.  Estrada is landing, but so is Gonzalez.  Estrada wears a look that says, “This Gonzalez is no joke,” after he takes a straight left to the head.

Referee Genaro Rodriguez administers a count to Gonzalez as Estrada looks on.

Referee Genaro Rodriguez administers a count to Gonzalez as Estrada looks on.

Gonzalez bounces a hard right off Estrada’s chin moments into the fifth.  However, rather than discourage, this only infuriates him.  Unleashing a furious body and head assault, Estrada caps it off with a thudding right to the jaw that knocks Gonzalez flat on his back.  Referee Geno Rodriguez counts four.  Rising, Gonzalez is dumped hard on his haunches.  Genaro Rodriguez counts and, moments later, Estrada is hoisted up on a corner man’s shoulders.  He’s won by knockout at 1:05 into the fifth round.

Davis (left) steps back from a Williams right to the body.

Davis (left) steps back from a Williams right to the body.

A former arena football player gifted with raw power, exciting Chicago heavyweight slugger Carl “Iron Fist” Davis, 38, had pared his hulking frame down to 197 lbs. to fight at cruiserweight following a disappointing stoppage loss to fringe heavyweight contender DaVarryl Williamson in April 2009.  In his first bout at cruiserweight, he raised his record to 15-3 and 11 knockouts against faded former International Boxing Federation cruiserweight champion Arthur Williams (200 lbs., 47-16 9 KO’s), 46, who hails from Pensacola, Florida.

Davis started aggressively in the first pumping a thudding jab.  He banged to the midriff hard with a right and bounced a glancing right off the side of Williams’s head.  Williams scored with a right and Davis clinched.

In the second, Davis bounced a right to the side of Williams’ head, a shot that bothered Williams and drew an “ooh” from the crowd. He drove a hard jab to Williams’ ample midriff and stalked.  Turning Williams, Davis parried him and Williams fell to the mat.  A right uppercut snapped William’s head back.  But just as Williams seemed in trouble, he bounced a jarring right to Davis’ head.  The crowd roared as the elderly Williams rallied.  Recovering, Davis buckled Williams into the ropes with another hard right.  The two tangled and threw with bad intentions as the round ended.

At the end of an otherwise uneventful third, Davis hurt Williams with a right to the body and head.

Davis (right) pumps a very stiff left jab to Williams' head.

Davis (right) pumps a very stiff left jab to Williams' head.

A chopping right to the head by Williams kicked off the fourth.  A smacking right followed.  Williams jarred Davis with a right over the top and bounced several hurtful follow up rights, but Davis ducked, weaved and pursued with renewed vigor.

“Don’t hit him, he’ll get mad,” someone shouted to Williams.

Williams (left) rattles Davis with a two fisted attack.

Williams (left) rattles Davis with a two fisted attack.

Someone shouted, “Hit him with your cane!” in the fifth.  Ironically, moments later, Williams rattled and drove Davis back with a hard right to the head.  However, his rally was short-lived, as a huge right dumped Williams into the ropes.  Referee Pete Podgorski gave him a standing eight count.  Pursuing, Davis punished him with an assortment of lefts and rights.

In between power punches, Davis was caught with an uppercut.  “Stay disciplined,” shouted one of Davis’ cornermen.

Davis continued to batter, but Williams evaded clean-landing blows starting the sixth.  “You’re throwing horse punches – sit down on your punches!” shouted a Davis corner man.  Williams began boxing with more effect, jabbing and hooking as Davis missed.

Davis just ducked under a right as Williams stormed in early in the seventh.  Pressing matters, he was catching a few counters.  A left-right to the head by Williams drew a roar from the crowd, but Davis continued to stalk, wining the jab and tossing that hard right.

A hard right thumped into Williams’ side early in the eighth and, moments later, a searing right just missed Davis’ head.  Williams bounced four punches to Davis torso and missed another right to the head. And then Davis drove him back with ponderous, thudding lefts and rights.

Davis (right) bombs with the uppercut as Williams covers up.

Davis (right) bombs with the uppercut as Williams covers up.

Davis pawed with probing lefts in the ninth, looking to drop in a hard right.  However, Williams was a seasoned pro, and he knew what was coming.  He dug five lefts and rights to Williams’ midsection, but was propelled and jarred with a couple hard rights.  It as if Davis sought to launch Williams’ head into orbit, but couldn’t quite land squarely enough.

Kicking off the tenth and final round, a right collapsed Williams like an imploding building into the ropes.  The crowd roared.  However, there was no standing eight count and, reviving, Williams fired lefts and rights, momentarily driving Davis back to the adjacent ropes.  Then, Davis stormed right back.  Turning his shoulders and back into looping rights and lefts, he battered away. A right wobbled Williams, yet he remained upright, firing back with authority.  The two traded until the final bell gonged.

Judges scored the bout 97-93 and 96-93 twce for the vacant USBO Cruiserweight title.

Gradovich (left) jars Atencio with a stiff left.

Gradovich (left) jars Atencio with a stiff left.

Arapaho, North Carolina’s featherweight Evgeny  Gradovich (126 lbs., 6-0, X KO’s) raised his record to 8-0 with 6 knockouts by stopping Denver, Colorado’s Tommy Atencio (4-6, 2 KO’s).

Gradovich boxed well in the first, mixing his punches well as he out-boxed his slower opponent.  And, in the second, he stunned Atencio with a flurry of lefts and rights.  Timekeeper Morrow said, “Oh, he was one punch away.” Atencio survived the onslaught and picking his spots, Gradovich banked more points.

Gradovich (right) attacks Atencio along the ropes.

Gradovich (right) attacks Atencio along the ropes.

Upping his efforts as the fight progressed, a flurry of lefts and rights finally turned the trick for Gradovich in round four, dropping Atencio to his knees.  Referee Geno Rodriguez waved it off at 1:59 into the fourth round.

There's not a hair out of place on Granados' head following his quick demolition of opponent Danforth.

There's not a hair out of place on Granados' head following his quick demolition of opponent Danforth.

Cicero, Illinois’ Adrian Granados (142 lbs., 7-1, 5 KO’s) had a short night, stopping Milwaukee, Wisconsin’s Justin Danforth (141 lbs., 6-16, 1 KO) at 24 seconds into the second round.  A smashing right to the jaw did the trick.  Taking a close look, referee Gerald Scott waved it off immediately.

Bondaravas (right) rips a left to the body as referee Gerald Scott looks on.

Bondaravas (right) rips a left to the body as referee Gerald Scott looks on.

Chicago’s Donatas Bondoravas (155.5 lbs., 11-1-1, 3 KO’s) slugged hard, but went the distance against rugged Troy, Michigan’s Brandon Baue (156 lbs., 12-5, 10 KO’s).

The aggressor in the first, Bondoravas banged well to the body with the left and right, peppered with the jab, and fired hard rights and lefts to the head that were mostly blocked.  Baue waved him in and even managed a few shots to the body at rounds end.

Baue kicked off the second pumping a jab and circled, growling as he tossed his shots.  Bonndoravas came back with hard, looping rights and lefts to the head that were partially blocked by gloved fists.  Baue mocked with growls and, coming off the ropes, resumed the jab and move.  Bondaravas accelerated his attack, pasting his stubborn opponent to the ropes with wicked blows in the waning seconds.

Revived in the third, Baue flurried with jabs and crosses and circled.  Then, it was Bondaravas’ turn.  He dug much heavier lefts and rights to the sides and walloped to the head.  Stalking his retreating prey, he flicked a rangefinder jab.  A borderline blow drew referee Gerald Scott’s warning. The two touched gloves, and Bondaravas continued to pressure.

Baue continued to flurry in spots in the fourth and up on his toes, retreated.  Gloves tucked tight and high, he sustained punishment along the ropes.

Baue (left) slugs back with a vengeance.

Baue (left) slugs back with a vengeance.

Suddenly, Baue was on the attack in the fifth.  Someone said, “His hand is hurt” about Bonvaderas.  Whatever the case, Baue was now taking the fight to Bondaveras with lefts and rights.  And then the tables turned.  Bondaveras battered with pile driver rights down the pike.  Baue buckled, but didn’t fall.  In the meanwhile, Bondaveras piled up points.

Bondaravas was warned in the seventh to keep his punches up when a left scored just below the beltline.  He scored with hard rights to the head and ripping lefts to the belly.   Swelling and an abrasion below Baue’s left eye grew and he was rocked by a right uppercut to the chin near rounds end.

The two traded at close quarters to kick off the eighth and final round, but as was the case earlier, Bondaravas’ power took over and forced Baue to retreat.  A left knocked the mouthpiece out of Baue’s mouth.  However, Baue simply kicked it away, retreated, and came back with jabs of his own.  Cut over his left brow and on the bridge of his nose, Bondaravas pressured, but could not extinguish his rugged adversary’s defiance.

Judges scored the bout 80-72 and 79-73 twice for Bondavaras, who won by unanimous decision.

Russ (left) peppers Augustama with a flurry in close.

Russ (left) peppers Augustama with a flurry in close.

Fayetteville, North Carolina’s Lamar Russ (160 lbs., 5-0, X KO’s) and Miami, Florida’s Eli Augustama (162 lbs., 5-1, X KO’s) pitched an entertaining fight at close quarters, with Augustana appearing slightly faster, but Russ the more effective puncher.  Ultimately, judges scoring the bout 57-57, 59-55 and 58-56 for Lamar Russ.  It was very close and not without some controversy.  Augustama said “It should have been at least a draw,” after the decision was announced.

No one was complaining.  It was a real, pre-Christmas treat.  Cheers.

PROMOTER:  Dominic Pesoli’s 8 Count Productions

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