The CBZ Newswire

Changing the Guard in Hammond: Fight Night at the Horseshoe Casino/Friday Night Fights

by on Aug.21, 2011, under Boxing News, Guest Columnists

David Diaz (L) and Hank Lundy square off just before Lundy scores the final knockdown

David Diaz (L) and Hank Lundy square off just before Lundy scores the final knockdown

Report by Kerstin Broockmann

Photos by Scott Dray

HAMMOND, IN, August 19, 2011 — Hitz Boxing and Banner Promotions teamed up with ESPN’s Friday Night Fights to showcase three bouts between older, more experienced boxers looking to stay in the elite, and younger, stronger rivals hoping to use them as stepping stones to their own future careers. On the card were three Olympians, Chicago’s Montell Griffin and David Diaz and Demetrius Andrade. Diaz, 35, faced 28-year-old Philadelphia, Pennsylvania native “Hammerin’” Hank Lundy, a decorated amateur in his own right before embarking on his pro career, amassing a professional record of 20-1-1 (his only loss coming to John Molina), with 10 KO’s before proving his mettle by putting his NABF Lightweight title on the line against the far more experienced challenger Diaz. Demetrius Andrade had been considered one of the best prospects for a professional career of the 2008 Olympians, but has encountered some criticism for the level of competition he has encountered in his first 13 bouts, all of which he won. His decisive win against the 40-year-old but still dangerous Contender Season 2 winner Grady “Bad Boy” Brewer might allay some criticism, but Andrade’s defensive style, while effective, is proving a hard sell for casual boxing fans who prefer a less studious approach to earning a victory.  The undercard featured some entertaining scraps as well, including Montell Griffin’s bout against former contender Deandrey Abron, who had no answer for Griffin’s ring experience and I.Q. Griffin perhaps had the most successful evening of the Olympic trio, notching his 50th win by schooling his younger opponent in the old-school tricks of the trade that made him a champion.

The first bout featured featherweights Evgeny Gradovich (10-0, 6 KO’s, 126 lbs.)of Russia, now based in Arapahoe, North Carolina, squaring off against Providence, Rhode Island’s veteran Robert “Don’t Lose” Da Luz (16.2 lbs.). In the first round, Gradovich avoided most of Da Luz’s probing jabs to head, while directing combinations to body and head at his opponent, frequently backing him into the ropes.  Da Luz’s low left hand left him open to some sharp right hooks. While Gradovich clearly outworked Da Luz, Da Luz continued to launch sporadic attacks and seemed unfazed by Gradovich’s offense.

In the second round, Gradovich seemed to put more of his weight into his punches, continuing to throw in combinations, and landing some body shots that took their toll. Da Luz couldn’t get a solid combination going and Gradovich pinned him to the ropes on several occasions when he let his hands drop.

Da Luz (L) charges Gradovich

Da Luz (L) charges Gradovich

In round three, Da Luz tried to launch a more serious offensive, however, Gradovich countered well and then continued to outpoint his American foe, making sure that he continued his assault to the ribcage and keeping Da Luz backing away throughout. Round four continued along similar lines; Gradovich avoided the tired Da Luz’s attempts at offense, taking advantage of Da Luz’s low guard in exchanges.

Gradovich (L) prepares a body shot

Gradovich (L) prepares a body shot

Da Luz tried to get back in the game at the top of the fifth round, which seemed to motivate Gradovich to throw even more punches. Gradovich’s assault was clearly visible by mid-round. Near the end of the round, Da Luz resorted to haymakers, a number of which found their mark, to the delight of the crowd. The sixth round was dominated decisively by Gradovich, who continued to tirelessly throw body-head combinations at Da Luz.

Despite the constant assault from Gradovich, Da Luz (L) hung in until the final bell

Despite the constant assault from Gradovich, Da Luz (L) hung in until the final bell

In the seventh, Gradovich found his mark early and often with straight shots up the center, followed by hooks when Da Luz closed up his guard. A mid-round assault from Gradovich looked like it might lead to the end, but Da Luz recovered center ring once more and hung in to the end of the round. In the final round, Da Luz tried early for a knockout, but once again found himself being peppered with punches from Gradovich. A volley of straight punches drove him to the ropes and bloodied his nose, but he spun out and seemed to be daring Gradovich to finish the fight. Gradovich tried to oblige, punching the game veteran around the ring, at one point knocking out his mouth guard. The judges were unanimous in awarding Gradovich the decision, with scores of 80-72 across the board. Evgeny Gradovich remains undefeated, while Robert Da Luz falls to 13-39-3, 9 KO’s though he denied his foe another KO.

Chris Singleton (L) looks to counter Gabriel Morris's attack

Chris Singleton (L) looks to counter Gabriel Morris's attack

The second bout of the evening featured a Jr. Welterweight bout between veteran Gabriel Morris, of Toledo, Ohio (4-12-2, 140 lbs.) and undefeated Baton Rouge, Louisiana, prospect Chris Singleton (now 3-0, 2 KO’s). Singleton landed the first telling punch of the bout a hard overhand right. As Morris frequently kept his left low, this proved an effective punch for Singleton on several occasions. Both fighters spend much of the first round trying to land a big punch to put their opponent won. Near the two minute mark, Singleton did just that, landing a perfect left to Morris’s temple. Morris looked a bit shaky after the eight count, but recovered enough to withstand Singleton’s attempt to finish. Though Morris took more hard shots, he stayed competitive to the end of the round. The second round saw a more cautious Morris trying to pick his shots through a higher guard, though Singleton continuously found a home for a stiff jab.

Singleton (L) traps Morris as he tries to reach the inside line

Singleton (L) traps Morris as he tries to reach the inside line

Morris started the third round moving well, forcing Singleton to launch forward for an attack that was mostly smothered . Morris went down again as a result of a punch/push from Singleton, which referee Gerald Scott ruled a slip. A huge left hook from Morris had Singleton off-balance, but he recovered quickly. Both boxers unsuccessfully tried to find an opportunity to land another big punch, exchanging short volleys to the end of the round.

Singleton showed off faster hands as he launched his attack in the fourth, landing his overhand right again. However, Morris continued to move out of harm’s way much of the time and landed some good shots of his own. The judge’s scores reflected the competitive fight. While awarding Singleton the well-deserved unanimous decision, the fact that Morris made him fight to keep his “0” was also acknowledged with scores coming in at 39-36, 38-37, and 40-35. The fact that all of those scores were justifiable is a testament to the spirit of both boxers. Though Singleton had the upper hand through most of the bout, Morris kept him making adjustments.

Dwayne Wisdom (L) begins his assault on Paulie Settepani's body

Dwayne Wisdom (L) begins his assault on Paulie Settepani's body

The third bout featured the professional boxing debut of Indianapolis, Indiana’s Dwayne”The Ghost” Wisdom (125.2 lbs.) against Chicago’s Paulie Settepani  (126.2 lbs.) in a featherweight bout scheduled for four rounds.  In the first round, both boxers led with jabs. Wisdom quickly realized that he needed to get inside on his much taller opponent and drove Settepani to the ropes with a volley of body shots, following up with some hooks to the head. Mid-round, Settepani started to use his reach advantage, landing a nice combination. However, Wisdom quickly countered, throwing all his weight into a right cross that dropped Settepani. After this exchange, neither boxer was able to find their respective range.

Settepani (R) lands a jab to Wisdom's midsection

Settepani (R) lands a jab to Wisdom's midsection

Round two found Wisdom literally dancing at the end of Settepani’s jab, generally avoiding it with his head movement, though this round, Settepani did not let him inside for an extended time. Nevertheless, Wisdom snuck in quite a few single shots and managed to force Settepani back again in the second minute, landing a solid body-hook combination before stepping back to avoid a counter. Settepani relied too heavily on his jab, generally keeping Wisdom at bay but letting him land effective, if single, shots without attempting to launch an offense of his own.

Referee Curt Spivey raises Wisdom's hand in victory

Referee Curt Spivey raises Wisdom's hand in victory

Round three started slowly, with Settepani jabbing at Wisdom, occasionally landing to the body, and Wisdom seeming content to look for an opportunity. Which he was. Wisdom used his head movement to get inside and pounced, throwing two body shots followed by a left hook to the head. He repeated this three times, at which point Settepani’s knees started to buckle and referee Curt Spivey stepped in for the count, waving off the bout at 1:13 of the round. Dwayne Wisdom had a successful debut, winning by TKO, while Paulie Settepani fell to 1-1.

Henry "Hammerin' Hank" Lundy (R) attacks David Diaz in the first round

Henry "Hammerin' Hank" Lundy (R) attacks David Diaz in the first round

The televised portion of the evening began with the 10-Round Lightweight bout between David Diaz (134.4 lbs.) and Hank Lundy (134.6 lbs.) for the NABF Lightweight championship.  Round One started with both boxers in southpaw stance, trying to come inside and clinching. After some probing punches, Lundy landed the first telling blows, throwing a combination to head and body with a solid uppercut in the mix. Throughout the first round, Lundy seemed to be landing the harder blows. Both boxers moved well, but Lundy showed off the sharper punching skills. 

Lundy (R) reacts to a body shot from Diaz

Lundy (R) reacts to a body shot from Diaz

Diaz set the pace in the second round, but Lundy’s head movement and speed let him gain the upper hand. When Diaz moved Lundy to the corner a slugfest ensued with both throwing some punishing body shots and coming up for hooks, though Lundy landed more. A left hook to the body drew a grimace from Diaz midway through the round., Lundy finished with a volley of unanswered shots and a hard left hook to the head (from an orthodox stance).

Diaz (L) and Lundy exchange blows

Diaz (L) and Lundy exchange blows

Round three found Lundy fighting from a left lead. Diaz got in some fast combinations early in the round, but Lundy pot-shotted successfully in the second half, landing some solid rights while not allowing the challenger to land any damaging blows.

Lundy goes down

Lundy goes down

Early in the fourth, Diaz drove Lundy, still in his orthodox stance, into the ropes with a barrage of body shots and then kept up the pressure. A right hook followed immediately by a left cross sent Lundy to the canvas. He looked to recover at the end of the eight count, but Diaz attacked fiercely, not giving Lundy any space to regain his bearings. Once again backing Lundy into the ropes, Diaz unleashed a full arsenal of shots from the inside, mixing hooks to the body with straight shots and uppercuts. While Lundy didn’t look hurt, he was having trouble finding any space at all to counter.  Lundy finally extricated himself from the corner and Diaz again pursued, resulting in an exchange as the action moved across the ring, during which Diaz sustained a cut above his right eye (it was unclear to this reporter whether this was a result of a headbutt or a punch – as Lundy claimed—or an elbow—as Diaz claimed).

Lundy (L) finds his target

Lundy (L) finds his target

Back in his right lead, Lundy appeared to be targeting the cut above Diaz’s eye from the beginning of the fifth round, while Diaz showed a sense of urgency in looking for an opening for the knockout punch he needed to win before the cut stopped it.  While Diaz found some good shots, including a very solid left cross, his heart overwhelmed his defensive skills allowing Lundy to take his time, pick his shots and shift his weight into his punches, while avoiding Diaz’s bombs. Midway through the round, referee Gerald Scott called on the ringside doctor to check out the cut, which was by now bleeding profusely. The doctor allowed the round to continue, and Diaz immediately went on the attack, throwing a huge left that rocked Lundy for a moment. He recovered, and both boxers fought ferociously to the end of the round, with Lundy continuing to dominate.

Diaz's legs buckle after a short, hard cross from Lundy (R) that ends the bout

Diaz's legs buckle after a short, hard cross from Lundy (R) that ends the bout

In the sixth, Lundy continued in his southpaw stance and gunning for the cut above Diaz’s eye. A quick jab-cross combo made an impact. Moments later, Lundy set up another left cross with a short jab, and landed the blow perfectly, knocking Diaz down for the count 37 seconds into the round. Lundy retained his NABF title by TKO against the far more experienced Diaz, whose record now stands at 36-4-1. Lundy showed off some impressive boxing smarts early in the bout, and showed his heart in battling back through adversity when Diaz had him in trouble. Diaz demonstrated that he is still a warrior, giving Lundy a great fight before a troubling cut and a powerful cross stalled his comeback attempt. Lundy moves to 21-1-1, 11 KO’s in a barnburner of a fight.

Lundy celebrates his victory

Lundy celebrates his victory

A lightweight bout scheduled for six rounds between Toledo, Ohio’s Martin Tucker (7-10, 3 KO’s) vs. Yakubu “Black Mamba” Amidu (20-2-1, 18 KO’s) would not go the distance. Round one started with some feeling out, Amidu showing a sharp jab, though Tucker was the first to land a successful combination.  However, the next time he tried to come in Amidu hit him with a short, but powerful left hook. Amidu’s awkward movement and reach made him a tough target to hit, despite the fact that he fought from an unusually square stance and launched attacks with his chin up.

Martin Tucker (L) launches an attack against Yakubu Amidu

Martin Tucker (L) launches an attack against Yakubu Amidu

In round two, Tucker forced his way inside Amidu’s longer reach more aggressively and some small successes, but Amidu stepped back and kept him at bay with quick high jabs and solid jabs to the body, which he sometimes followed with a hard right cross over Tucker’s low left.

Tucker (R) responds as Amidu throws a cross in his final attack

Tucker (R) responds as Amidu throws a cross in his final attack

Amidu started putting his punches together in the third round, forcing Tucker onto the ropes where he unleashed a series of right crosses that appeared to have Tucker out on his feet for a moment before referee Curt Spivey intervened to begin the count, before deciding to wave off the bout at :50 of round three over Tucker’s protestations.

Grady Brewer (L) tries to think of a gameplan against Demetrius Andrade

Grady Brewer (L) tries to think of a gameplan against Demetrius Andrade

The main event between NABF and IBC Junior Middleweight Champion Grady “Bad Boy” Brewer of Lawton, Oklahoma, and Providence Rhode Island’s Demetrius “Hot Hands” Andrade was a lopsided affair, with Brewer unable to find a game plan that would allow him to deal with Andrade’s careful offense and airtight defense. Round one saw southpaw Andrade using his left cross successfully to Brewer’s head and body. Brewer had difficulty getting past Andrade’s jab, and most of his attempts were met by the cross. Andrade mostly opted to stay outside, keeping Brewer at the end of his reach. Near the end of the round, Andrade landed a right hook that had Brewer stumbling.

Andrade (R) subdues Brewer

Andrade (R) subdues Brewer

Brewer continued to try to get inside in round two, but continued to be stymied by Andrade’s jab. When he did launch his way in, Andrade would simply clinch and release. On one of these occasions, Brewer stumbled backwards and fell.  Andrade went on the attack after Brewer finally managed to land a left hook, driving Brewer back to the ropes and rocking him with a left cross in a combination. Brewer escaped, but was effectively on the run.

Andrade (R) stalks Brewer

Andrade (R) stalks Brewer

In round three, Andrade took the center of the ring, throwing short combinations whenever Brewer came inside. Brewer had trouble dealing with Andrade’s combination of holding and punching and occasionally turned his back as he moved to elude Andrade’s grasp or punches, losing his balance and falling at one point.

Brewer (L) tries to come inside

Brewer (L) tries to come inside

Andrade started moving even more in round four, leaving the shorter Brewer with few options for launching an inside attack. This strategy displeased many of those assembled, who would have preferred a more punch-based offense, though Andrade easily outworked Brewer as he kept him away.

Brewer (R) runs into a counter from Andrade

Brewer (R) runs into a counter from Andrade

Andrade picked up the punch volume a little at the beginning of the fifth round. A stiff combination had Brewer slipping upon retreat, and a little later a left cross had Brewer trying to lean through the ropes to get away. When the action resumed center ring, Andrade threw an uppercut that had Brewer backpedalling and landed some good straight punches on his retreating foe, though a clinch ended his chance of finishing the fight. The rest of the round continued the game of cat and mouse, with Brewer scurrying away from Andrade’s single jabs and crosses.

Andrade (R) jabs through Brewer's guard

Andrade (R) jabs through Brewer's guard

Andrade had Brewer going back on several occasions in the first half of round six, landing some vicious left crosses and uppercuts, but never managing to capitalize on the momentum. While Andrade was clearly the aggressor, he seemed to take a safety-first approach to this role. Brewer took advantage of this a few times to land some decent shots, but could not find a game plan that worked.

Brewer went on the attack at the top of the seventh, and landed a few punches before Andrade danced out of reach. Another assault drew a counter from Andrade, ending in what appeared to be a blow to the back of Brewer’s head as Brewer spun to avoid the onslaught. Referee Curt Spivey warned both boxers, Andrade for hitting the back of the head, and Brewer for turning his back on his opponent. It was a rough, physical round, with few telling blows.

Brewer launched the first telling attack of the eighth round, a three punch combination. A solid cross to Andrade’s body a few moments later made it seem like he had perhaps figured out a way to get to his long-limbed challenger. However, Andrade once again began moving and throwing single, hard punches, taking away Brewer’s desire to launch an attack. When Brewer committed to a punch, Andrade just threw out a jab and stepped out of reach.

Brewer (L) crashes in on Andrade

Brewer (L) crashes in on Andrade

Round nine featured more of Andrade’s passive outside offense and a lot of clinching on both sides, though at one point in the second half of the round, apparently out of sheer frustration, Brewer charged Andrade, landing a good combination to the body and couple of head shots. Unfortunately, Andrade got Brewer away again, and the next engagement after more jabbing and probing led to a head butt that resulted in a small cut to Brewer’s left eye, which became the target of Andrade’s jab.

Brewer (L) and Andrade nearly go through the ropes

Brewer (L) and Andrade nearly go through the ropes

Brewer tried to attack several times in the tenth, but was rebuffed by either a jab or Andrade trapping an arm. When Brewer tried the same strategy, he almost pulled Andrade, who pitched forward, through the ropes on top of him. This may have been the most exciting moment of the fight. Andrade used his height and reach advantage almost too effectively, and Brewer showed some potential on the inside, but neither boxer seemed to be hungry enough to take the risks they needed to make a statement.  Though not exciting, Andrade thoroughly out-boxed the man thought to be his sternest test to date and judges awarded him with scores of 98-92 once and 99-91 twice for the unanimous decision, bringing his record to 14-0, 9 KO’s) while former champion Grady Brewer fell to 28-13, 16 KO’s.

Unscathed victor Demetrius Andrade

Unscathed victor Demetrius Andrade

Jeremy Wood (165.2 lbs.) of Sydney, Ohio, looked to double his wins by taking on Secret Service agent Mike “Kujo” Kurzeja (167 lbs.)in the next bout. The taller Wood showed a quick jab that kept Kurzeja at bay for a bit, but his raised chin made him an easy target for counters. Wood would jab, back up as Kurzeja countered, and eventually land an uppercut or jab that allowed him to get his back off the ropes in round one.

Jeremy Wood (L) jabs at Mike Kurzeja

Jeremy Wood (L) jabs at Mike Kurzeja

In round two, Kurzeja launched a preemptive attack, not allowing Wood to use his jab. A stiff jab and cross from Kurzeja mid-round seemed to have Wood in trouble, but Wood got away. In the latter half of the round, Kurzeja threw a succession of volleys at Wood and it looked as though he were on his way to finishing the fight, but Wood held out until the end.

Kurzeja (L) runs into a counter from Wood

Kurzeja (L) runs into a counter from Wood

Round three found Kurzeja picking up where he left off, leaning in to reach his taller foe, which allowed Wood to land a straight right on Kurzeja as he launched inside and backed him into the ropes. Somehow Kurzeja escaped and shortly thereafter pounded Wood with hooks to the body and head. Both fighters took turns pummeling each other, though Kurzeja had a few more occasions to do so.

Kurzeja (L) drives an uppercut through Wood's guard

Kurzeja (L) drives an uppercut through Wood's guard

Wood attacked first in the fourth, but most of the action in the first half of the round stayed center with the boxers exchanging bombs.  Kurzeja showed off better accuracy and power in these exchanges, though Wood did not back down. With the difference in size between the two boxers, and a willingness to mix it up and abandon defense, it was a hard-fought, entertaining bout that remarkably went the distance despite both boxers eating some massive punches. At the end, all judges gave the slightly more polished Kurzeja the decision, with unanimous scores of 40-36. Kurzeja moved to 5-0-1, 4 KO’s, while the durable Wood fell to 1-4, 1 KO.

Montell Griffin (L) slips a jab thrown by Deandrey Abron

Montell Griffin (L) slips a jab thrown by Deandrey Abron

Another Olympian and former WBC Champion, Chicago’s Montell “Ice” Griffin (178 lbs.) was next in the ring, with his second attempt at a 50th win (his first attempt having ended in a draw against Ross Thompson), this time against Youngtown, Ohio’s Deandrey Abron (175.6 lbs.).  Round one saw a relaxed Griffin using his movement to elude Abron’s initially aggressive offense. As Abron got less sure of himself, Griffin slowly backed him into the ropes and unleashed some powerful body shots, following them up with painful sounding hooks to the head.

Round two saw more of the same. Griffin’s bag of defensive tricks had Abron thoroughly confused. Griffin backed the hapless Abron into the corner and raked him with shots that took their toll on the younger man’s confidence though he managed to escape. The rest of the round found Abron using his jab to try to reach Griffin, who slipped, bobbed, weaved, shoulder-rolled and sometimes held to keep Abron from launching a successful offense, though Abron did get in some solid hooks to Griffin’s ribcage.

Using his left shoulder to guard against Abron’s punches, Griffin popped his jab into Abron’s face while waiting for the chance to attack. When he did, he drove Abron into the ropes and peppered him with shots. Round three was back and forth, but Griffin avoided any damage, while Abron sustained some solid shots.

Abron (R) attacks Griffin

Abron (R) attacks Griffin

Abron came out faster in round four, but Griffin’s defensive crouch behind his left shoulder allowed him to wait out the assault, whereupon he once again attacked, driving Abron back into the corner and landing a crushing left hook. The action seesawed for a while, with Abron landing a nice hook of his own before Griffin once again had him on the ropes.

Griffin’s left hook found a home on Abron’s temple in the fifth round, interspersed with a few straight punches from both hands. Abron seemed to want to avoid punishment but his attempt at staying safe allowed Griffin to pick his punches.

Griffin (L) creatively counters an inside attack from Abron

Griffin (L) creatively counters an inside attack from Abron

Abron tried a different tactic in the sixth round, coming on aggressively. However, this left him open to Griffin’s straight punches whenever he threw a punch. As Abron grew tired and started carrying his hands low, Griffin teed off with a combination of straight punches and uppercuts. Near the end of the round, Abron appeared to push Griffin down, though it is possible their legs got tangled.
Abron started mirroring Griffin in the seventh, attempting to emulate the older man’s defense, but without the experience to do so. While he proved remarkably durable, Abron was taking some dangerous shots to the head from Griffin, who, however, did not stay inside to finish.

Griffin (L) has Abron on the run

Griffin (L) has Abron on the run

The tenth round found Abron trying to use his speed against the wily Griffin, who slipped most punches and countered with some speedy combinations of his own, in addition to more crushing hooks to the head. Though he seemed a bit dazed and at one point stumbled back, Abron refused to go down, staying in the fight and showing off some cute moves of his own to avoid more blows from Griffin. In the end, while Abron showed a willingness to engage, and some ability to change strategies, he did not stand a chance against the experience and ring intelligence of Montell Griffin, who showed his championship form in moving his record to 50 wins, eight losses and one draw, with 30 knockouts in the mix. Deandrey Abron certainly earned his paycheck, despite dropping to 15-10, 10 KO’s, and maybe picked up some pointers from his opponent in the process.

The final bout of the evening featured junior middleweights Hammond’s own “Modern Day Warrior” Ruben Galvan (146 lbs.) against Rockford, Illinois’ “Bazooka” Joe Linenfelser (149 lbs.). Showing little finesse but a lot of fight veteran journeyman Galvan stormed Linenfelser at the bell. As long as he kept the assault going, Linenfelser had little opportunity to counter, but in the moments when Galvan relented, Linenfelser showed off some accurate and powerful punching skills. Galvan probably took the round on work rate. 

Linenfelser (L) uses his reach against Galvan

Linenfelser (L) uses his reach against Galvan

The second round began with Linenfelser on the attack, though Galvan soon returned fire. It appeared to be turning into a boxer/brawler matchup, though Galvan showed better defense than many brawlers and Linenfelser demonstrated a greater willingness to take risks than most boxers. It was an entertaining, back and forth round, though Linenfelser was able to use his reach to supplement some good inside punching skills to win it.

The third round showed something of a reversal, as Galvan kept moving around the ring to avoid Linenfelser, and which he did quite well. By mid-round, Galvan went back on the attack and Linenfelser met his challenge, standing toe to toe and causing referee Curt Spivey to worry about potential head butts. A low blow from Galvan resulted in a pause in the action, which resumed right where it had stopped with an inside brawl.

Galvan pursued in the fourth and final round, though his punches were outnumbered by Linenfelser’s counters. Both boxers went effectively to the body and gave it all as they squared off and blasted away until the final bell. Final judges scores saw the bout as 39-37 twice and 40-36 once for Joe Linenfelser (10-1-1, 6 KO’s). Ruben Galvan’s record now stands at 27-18-4, 10 KO’s.

Linenfelser (R) celebrates his victory as Sam Colonna looks on

Linenfelser (R) celebrates his victory as Sam Colonna looks on

Demetrius Andrade proved that he should be testing himself against some stiffer competition in frustrating the more experienced Grady Brewer en route to a well-deserved lopsided decision. While he would win more fans by finishing fast, his methodical destruction of his foe left no doubt about his skills. David Diaz proved that he is still the never-quit warrior willing to leave it all in the ring to get the victory, but Henry Lundy proved that he can weather the storm, using his footwork and counter-punching abilities to outpoint Diaz in all but one round before landing his knockout punch. Montell Griffin, though Deandry Abron could not be considered a serious threat (though he notched some victories against solid competition early in his career), nevertheless put in an impressively dominant performance.  Gabriel Morris deserves credit for keeping his fights exciting in every outing, this evening turning up the heat on Chris Singleton, who proved himself up to the challenge.  Jeremy Wood and Mike Kurzeja showed more heart than skill, but brawled entertainingly and won over the crowd. Potential contender Evgeny Gradovich and newcomer Dwayne Wisdom also made an impression, Gradovich with his composed, measured annihilation of his opponent and Wisdom with his intelligent use of firepower.  Ring Announcer Tom Treiber deserves a special mention for keeping the action moving along and making sure the gaps were filled before his hometown crowd. Boxing aficionados were treated to examples of all styles, and no doubt there was something for everyone on display.

Mask of a warrior: David Diaz after round five, before getting patched up for the last round of his fight against Hank Lundy

Mask of a warrior: David Diaz after round five, before getting patched up for the last round of his fight against Hank Lundy

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