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Senya13
06-19-2010, 10:52 AM
Anybody knows when/where did this story first appear, that Broughton punished Stevenson so much in April 1741, that the latter died from injuries?

Mike DeLisa
06-19-2010, 02:14 PM
Good question!

I would check the Times of London.

In 1812, Egan reported the bout in the first part of Boxiana, which I just pulled off my shelf. He does not say Stevenson died, simply that he was forced to give up.

-- Mike

Senya13
06-19-2010, 03:43 PM
London Times/The Daily Universal Register appeared in 1785, half a century later.

That he died was doubted before (http://www.eastsideboxing.com/news.php?p=4966&more=1). He clearly didn't die as the result of the bout (which was won by Broughton on April 24, 1744, in 8 1/2 minutes), as Stevenson had another bout a year later (April 1745, with Anthony Jones), and in late November 1748 was among the pall-bearers together with Broughton, Taylor, Slack, Smallwood and Field, at the funeral of famous pugilist John James.

Both Egan and Miles quoted Capt. Godfrey, and neither claimed that Stevenson died, so I'm curious who and when invented the story.

Gallicrow
06-19-2010, 07:18 PM
What is your source for Stevenson's fight with Anthony Jones (I've never heard of this fighter) and for him being a pallbearer for John James?

There are certainly some very colourful descriptions of the Broughton vs Stevenson fight around (*), and I've always assumed that Stevenson did indeed die a month after the fight. However it is very curious that Egan doesn't mention Stevenson's death.

(*) E.g. see http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b177/gallicrow/GeorgeStevenson.jpg, which dates from 1915 or so.

Senya13
06-19-2010, 07:54 PM
London newspapers.
1745-04-09 The General Advertiser (page 1)
1748-11-26 The Whitehall Evening-Post Or London Intelligencer (page 2)
Egan (or whoever was the true author of the 1st volume) took it from Godfrey's treatise, obviously (or borrowed the description from 10th volume of Sporting Magazine).

Mike DeLisa
06-19-2010, 08:24 PM
Egan didn't say he died -- but he did write something to the effect of "his fighting heart gave out" -- meaning he was forced to quit.

Perhaps a quick reading gave someone else the wrong impression.

Unrelated, but in doing a little research to answer this, i came across the grim report that Figg's grave was opened in January 1735 because there had been rumors that his family had sold off his body for medical research! Recent rains had flooded the coffin, but Figg was there. UGH!

Mike DeLisa
06-19-2010, 08:30 PM
PS/same era related -- it had been written that boxing was outlawed because the Duke of Cumberland had lost money on a bout.

I did an extensive legal search some time ago -- incuding tracking down a copy of Habet! -- and found this to be completely false!

Senya13
12-23-2010, 03:26 AM
Unrelated, but in doing a little research to answer this, i came across the grim report that Figg's grave was opened in January 1735 because there had been rumors that his family had sold off his body for medical research! Recent rains had flooded the coffin, but Figg was there. UGH!
I found another thing to be weird. It was reported that Figg died on Dec 7, 1734 (according to contemporary local newspapers).

But, on March 14 and 17, 1734, the London Daily Advertiser carried the following announcement:

http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g252/Senya13/boxing/17340317LondonDailyAdvertiser_page2.gif
March 10, 1734-5

WHEREAS since the Death of my Brother James Figg, several Persons have gone to Gentlemen with a Pretence, that they were recommended by my said Brother in his last Illness, as duely qualified to teach the Weapons practised in his School; this is to assure the Public, that he (my brother) did not recommend any one, besides Mr. William Flanders, whom he declared alone capable, and who taught his Scholars during his Illness, and continues still to teach the said Gentlemen. In Compliance to my said Brother's earnest Request on his Death-Bed, I make the above Declaration.

Witness my Hand,
John Figg.
N. B. Mr. Flanders is to be spoken with at the Buffalo's Head Tavern in Bloomsbury-square.


What is that supposed to mean, I'm totally lost. If it were printed just once, I could understand that as they misplaced a page from a 1735 newspaper, and put it into 1734 one. But it was printed twice on two different dates in March 1734. On both scans the header of the advertisement is March 10, 1734-5, how to interpret that I don't know either.