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View Full Version : EDER JOFRE VS FIGHTING HARADA 1



olympic auditorium
12-14-2005, 11:33 PM
I just finished recording the JOFRE FIGHT FOR a friend, Jofre didnt look like one of the best bantams of all time.Something seemed wrong I was wondering was Jofre over the hill? Did HE have trouble making weight? I did some research and I FOUND OUT THE day of the weigh in Jofre was 2 pounds over.THAT EXPLAINS THE LEATHER HE WAS EATING ALL NIGHT.He had no legs that night,Harada was having fun with JOFRE THAT NIGHT.AT this point in his career Jofre was having trouble making 118lbs.Jofre complained that Harada was butting and holding on all night,I did not see any of that going on.It was a good fight .Harada won in 15rds.

TKO11
12-15-2005, 11:32 AM
Jofre did have to strip weight the day of the fight, but there was more to it than that. First he was at the end of a long reign, and second he was up against Fighting Harada! Harada is starting to get his due, but for a long time he wasn't as appreciated as he should be. The guy was a freakin' monster. As a flyweight he was the division's Joe Frazier, mowing down everything in his path. He should have been undefeated as a fly, losing only a narrow decision to Kingpetch in a fight he was clearly and undeniably shafted.

After moving up to Bantie he lost to Medel, but that fight was the definition of "lucky punch". He was KILLING Medel until Jose unexplainably landed a shot that would have felled a Grizzly bear. Harada set things right in the rematch by picking up the ass-kicking where he left off, this time not catching the miracle punch.

Aftre beating Jofre for the title (and I agree that Jofre probably deserved a very close nod in the rematch), he went undefeated for another three years. So in the first 8 years of his career, against top-notch opp all the way, he only clearly lost one fight, on a miracle punch. You could argue the Jofre rematch and the Kingpetch fights, but these are greats of their divisions as well, and one was a monster screwgie.

Harada RAN out of his corner every round. He fought like the Tasmanian Devil from round one to round fifteen. He hit hard, had a chin of tempered steel and though nobody seems to think of him as Greb or Armstrong-like in his aggressiveness, he most certainly was. The guy was a great, great fighter.

Jofre's losses to Harada shouldn't be seen in any light that diminishes Eder, but rather in the light of just how fantastic a fighter Harada was.

SigniferSanctusMichael
12-15-2005, 01:51 PM
TKO11,

I have never seen Harada fight - how hard a puncher would you say he was (e.g. in comparison to his best contemporaries and the great names in Bantam history)? He doesn't have an executioner's ko record, but then again records can be deceptive.

Also, was he ever ko'd, or were the losses to Medel and Famechon stoppages?

Thanks.

TKO11
12-15-2005, 02:11 PM
IMO Harada wasn't a puncher's puncher, but he could definitely hurt guys with one-shot. That makes him a hard hitter for a Flyweight. When he was set he could really whack, but his perrenial motion style prevented that from happening very often. Good hitter, not great.

Both of his losses were stoppages, rather than being counted out. Against Medel... you have to see the shot he took to appreciate it. Medel wasn't a killer, but he put everything he had into that punch and it landed FLUSH. Harada went down like a sack of grain, but beat the count, though he was clearly out on his feet. Nobody ever hurt him like that in any other fight.

The Famechon fights are kind of freaky. In the first, the ref was the only judge. Harada knocked Johnny down three or four times, and when the scoring was announced it was a draw. Then the ref announced he'd miscalculated his card and that Famechon was the winner. universally considered the wrong call too. In the rematch (great fight btw) both guys hammered each other. Harada knocked Famechon down at least once, and the fight was very close when Famechon knocked Harada through the ropes. He beat the count, was clearly hurt, and the ref stopped it.

TheSentinel
12-16-2005, 01:34 AM
Remember, Jofre lost the fight to the 118 limit as much as he did to Harada's attack. Harada clearly got robbed against Famechon in the 1st fight. At 126 Jofre clearly would beat Harada.

olympic auditorium
12-16-2005, 09:05 PM
HARADA WAS A GREAT FIGHTER.HE HAD GUTS AND THERE WAS NO QUIT IN HIM.THAT LUCKY PUNCH YOU MENTIONED IN THE 1ST MEDEL FIGHT DOESNT EXIST.I DID HAVE HARADA AHEAD AT THE TIME THE FIGHT WAS STOPPED,BUT HE NEVER HAD MEDEL HURT.IT WAS THE OPPOSSITE ,AT THE END OF THE 3RD RD HARADA WAS THE ONE WHO WAS HURT.IN RD 6 HARADA GOT CAUGHT WITH SOME HOOKS AND UPPERCUTS WHICH HAD HIS ASS IN SERIOUS TROUBLE.YET HE WAS STILL GAME ENOUGH TRYING TO BRAWL WITH MEDEL.HARADA TOOK AN ASS WHOOPING THAT 6TH RD.I DONT KNOW WHERE YOU SAW A MIRACLE PUNCH COME FROM ,NOT IN THIS FIGHT BUDDY.DONT BE FOOLED BY SOME OF THE WILD PUNCHES HARADA THREW,THAT WERE BEING BLOCKED AND SLIPPED BY MEDEL.LETS GIVE MEDEL THE CREDIT HE DESERVED FOR STAYING IN FRONT OF HARADA THROUGHOUT THE FIGHT.

TKO11
12-16-2005, 10:44 PM
Based on your post Olympic, I'd sure love to see it again. I don't recall Harada being hurt at any point in the fight until he was nailed with the shot that dropped him. I admit it's been a long time since I saw it, but your recall of the fight is vastly different than mine. I remember Harada clearly winning every round until he was knocked out. Not to suggest that Medel was just standing there and taking it, but I don't remember him having any notable success until the 6th round.

And contrary to your post I was not trying to take anything away from Medel - I think he was a very, very good fighter who was unfortunate enough to come along at the same time as Jofre.

Dan1213
12-21-2005, 02:39 PM
During his four-and-a-half year reign as champion Eder was having more difficulty making the division's 118 pound limit than with the fighters in his division. On May 17, 1965, Eder traveled to Japan to defend his title for the ninth time against number one contender Masahiko (Fighting) Harada. The morning of the fight Eder was more than 2 pounds overweight at the weigh-in. After an hour's run he scaled the division limit of 118 without an ounce to spare. "I thought to myself, after this fight I'm going to eat and drink until I make heavyweight! He joked." 20

JOFRE-HARADA I (Reported by Boxing Illustrated Correspondent Tony Petronella 21 )

NAYOGA, Japan - Masahiko (Fighting) Harada, fighting in his familiar whirl-wind style, piled up a huge early lead, and then switched to a defensive pattern in the closing rounds to capture the world bantamweight title, with a 15-round split-decision over the hitherto unbeaten Eder Jofre. It marked the very first setback of his professional career for Senor Jofre, who entered the ring sporting a string of 50 consecutive triumphs, including eight successful defenses. A tumultuous crowd of 12,000 went wild when Referee Barney Ross, former world lightweight and welterweight champion, raised Harada's right hand in token of victory. The intrepid 22-year-old southpaw warrior set a tremendous pace right from the start and piled up points with an aggressive, two-fisted attack that had the title-holder on the verge of a knockout in the fourth round. Jofre just managed to avert a total blackout. But the sturdy challenger continued to maintain a blazing tempo. Showing the ring rust from his long lay off Jofre was unable to keep up the pace. Harada, who held the Flyweight championship briefly, after knocking out Pone Kingpetch, continued buzz-sawing Jofre with a pressuring attack of rights and lefts for the first ten rounds. Then very wisely, the Japanese battler switched tactics, by boxing careful in the center of the ring - and using flickering rights to keep knockout-conscious Jofre from getting set to unload his big guns. Harada again staggered the champ in the eleventh. But Jofre came roaring back with an all-out barrage; and almost delivered a kayo, when he sent Harada reeling against the ropes with a stunning series of lefts and rights. From the twelfth on, Harada managed to keep the action at long range as Jofre stalked him, hoping to get across the big punch - which never did come. The newly crowned champ tipped the beam at 117 1/4, while Jofre just did get under the wire at 118. And since there is no return bout clause in their championship contract, Jofre seemed uncertain whether or not he would continue campaigning in an effort to regain the crown. An exceedingly slow start apparently lost the fight for the overconfident Jofre, a 29-year-old veteran who had registered 33 in a row, the last 17 by kayo. Harada opened up a cut above Jofre's left eye in the sixth - the very first time the Brazilian had been cut in 51 professional bouts. In the midst of his fifth year in the pro ranks, Harada has now achieved a record of 39 wins and 3 losses. Referee Barney Ross balloted 71-69 for Harada on the five-point must system. Judge Masao Kato of Japan had his countryman ahead 72-70, while the other Judge Jay Edson of Phoenix dissented by voting Jofre a 72-71 winner.

Six months later Eder entered the ring in his hometown against number ten ranked Manny Elias of Phoenix, Arizona. Eder was ahead by 3 points on all three score cards at the end of 10 rounds. But under Brazilian rules you need a four-point margin to gain a verdict. Eder did not have a four-point margin against Elias, so the fight was declared a draw. The draw did enable Eder to retain his number one ranking and more importantly earn a title shot against champion Masahiko (Fighting) Harada. Thirteen months after their first fight, Jofre and Harada squared off in Tokyo

JOFRE-HARADA II (Reported by Boxing Illustrated Correspondent Kuni Iwaya 22 )

TOKYO - Mashahiko (Fighting) Harada proved that his victory over Brazil's Eder Jofre last May was no fluke. He outfought the taller South American to retain the title in a spirited 15 round fight before over 15,000 screaming fans. For Harada, who had a wee bit of trouble making the 118-pound weight limit, it was the 41st win against 3 losses. Eder suffered his second loss, both to Harada. It was a hard fought struggle from the very first round, with Harada ploughing forward and slamming away with both hands to the body. Jofre boxed smartly during the early rounds, spearing his man with left jabs and stiff left uppercuts as he moved in, but the champion just shook off the blows like water, and kept pressing the attack. The first five rounds were fought on even terms - Harada threw many more punches, but most of them were blocked or parried by Jofre. The steady pace began to take a its toll on the 30-year-old challenger in the 6th round as Harada bulled him into the ropes and pounded away with both hands to the head and body. A slight cut was opened in the corner of Eder's left eye by one of the champion's right hooks. Eder rallied in the 7th round, but it was now obvious that he was slowing down. Harada kept the pressure on and won the next three rounds. Sensing that the fight was slipping away from him, Jofre staged a rally in the 11th and 12th rounds. In the 11th, a series of stiff jabs drew blood from the nose of the champion and in the 12th a series of left uppercuts snapped back the head of the Japanese, but that turned out to be the last winning round for the Brazilian. Harada just kept boring forward. The leaden legs of Jofre could no longer carry him out of range as Harada backed him into the ropes and pounded away to the head and body. The crowd began to holler for a knockout in the 14th as Jofre was forced to cover up under the steady rain of leather. With only seconds left in the round, the cut over Jofre's left eye was reopened and this time the blood cascaded down his face. Jofre was weary and beaten when he answered the bell for the final round, while the champion still appeared fresh. Harada bulled Jofre all over the ring in the final round, but was unable to bring him down. Except for a slight swelling under his right eye, the champion was unmarked at the finish, whereas Jofre's body was covered with welts and bruises, as was his face. The decision was unanimous: 71-68 by Judge Hirouki Tezaki; 71-69 by Judge Takeo Ugo and 69-68 by the referee, Nicholas Pope. Jofre said he was tired, but offered no excuses. He also said he wanted to think things over before deciding whether or not to continue fighting.

kikibalt
06-06-2006, 02:49 PM
http://i5.tinypic.com/11uzu6t.jpg

Zevl
06-06-2006, 03:14 PM
http://i5.tinypic.com/11v16br.jpg

Zevl
06-06-2006, 03:15 PM
http://i6.tinypic.com/11v18ol.jpg

Zevl
06-06-2006, 06:49 PM
http://i5.tinypic.com/11vl6c9.jpg

kikibalt
06-06-2006, 06:59 PM
http://i6.tinypic.com/11v18ol.jpg

I remember seeing Herman Marques fight a few times.

Frank

bodyblow
06-06-2006, 07:25 PM
This is one of my favorite fights, I thought both guys looked fantastic in it.

PeteLeo
06-06-2006, 08:01 PM
Man, just think how good Jofre could have been if he were a carnivore. PeteLeo.

Zevl
06-06-2006, 10:35 PM
http://i5.tinypic.com/14l0yh5.jpg

Zevl
06-12-2006, 04:27 PM
http://i6.tinypic.com/148i268.jpg

Enswell
06-13-2006, 12:22 AM
Did Jofre ever fight on american television?

Zevl
06-14-2006, 06:25 PM
http://i5.tinypic.com/14dm2d3.jpg

Zevl
06-22-2006, 11:30 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ft1JgSqHzTM

Rounds 4 & 5