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kikibalt
12-07-2005, 03:25 PM
If you were alive in 12-7-41 do you have any memories you would like to share

Frank B.

Chuck1052
12-08-2005, 08:24 AM
Frank- My parents were teenagers at the time,
so they remember it well. Man! That was a
long time ago.

I was thinking that WWII was a tremendous
turning point for Asian-Americans. After
the exploits of the 442nd Regimental Combat
Team (which contained only Japanese-
Americans at the enlisted level) in Italy and
France, people began to realize that the
injustice done to Asian-Americans.

In light of the current squabble over illegal aliens,
it is important to note that there were an
incrediable number of people of Mexican descent
who were in the U.S. Armed Forces during WWII,
including a large number of Congressional Medal
of Honor winners. During the 1930s, many people
of Mexican descent, including American-born
children, were repatriated from the U.S. to Mexico
because of the effects of the GREAT DEPRESSION.

- Chuck Johnston

- Chuck Johnston

kikibalt
12-08-2005, 01:00 PM
Chuck
I was 6 years old at the time of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, so i don't remember anything about that day , but i do remember later on about the black outs.
I remember living in a company town ( Simons Brick Yard ) in Montebello Ca. that was 100% of Mexicans and America born Mexicans like myself, i remember all the young men were of to the war, my dad two brothers went to war and came back with Purple Hearts . One memorie that stick to my mind is that my dad had a friend of Japanese descent that had a farm and when all the Japanese people were rounded up and sent to camps we moved into the farm where we stay for about a year, then we moved back to the company town where we lived up to 1952.
Tommy Umeda who fought Keeny Teran at the Olympic was in the 442nd Regiment, he was known as the " Go For Broke Kid ".
If you Google ( Simons Brick Yard ) you can get some info. on the company town


P.S.
I have a book of the Mex-Americans that won the Medal Of Honor, Johnny flores did not win a Medal of Honor , but he is in the book


Frank B.

kikibalt
12-08-2005, 02:41 PM
I think these men deserve a big salute from us , so i for one SALUTE them

Frank B.http://tinypic.com/iclogk.jpg

Chuck1052
12-08-2005, 05:45 PM
Frank- After graduating from high school, my father
joined the navy at the age of 17 in the summer of
1945. After breaking an ear drum while jumping
into a swimming pool, he was discharged after
serving sixty days in time to go to college in the
Fall.

There was a Japanese-American featherweight
from the Hawaiian Islands named Hank Nakamura
who was a Sgt. in the 100th Battalion (Japanese-
American unit) when he was killed while leading a
patrol in Italy during WWII. The 100th Battalion
later became a part of the famed 442nd Regimental
Combat Team, which sustained huge number of
casualties during the war.

- Chuck Johnston


was later

kikibalt
12-08-2005, 06:32 PM
Chuck-here is some fighters from Hawaii from those dayshttp://tinypic.com/icmnnt.jpg

kikibalt
12-08-2005, 07:33 PM
The name is Dado Marino ex-flyweight champ an not Marina

Frank B.

kikibalt
12-08-2005, 07:42 PM
Chuck- i see where Hank Nakamura had most of his fights back east , he only had a few fights in Hawaii

Frank B.

Chuck1052
12-08-2005, 08:54 PM
Frank- Yes, Hank Nakamura had some fights
on the mainland of the U.S. By the way,
Hank Kaplan saw Nakamura in action in
New York City, saying that he had fine
boxing skills.

I have a photograph of Hank Nakamura
and Gene Espinosa posing before their
bout in which Nakamura won. Espinosa
was a Filipino fighter who lived in
Guadalupe, California, which is located
near Santa Maria. He was active
in California, fighting such well-known
fighters like Henry Armstrong (at least
three times), Freddie Miller, Johnny Pena,
Vern Bybee, and a number of others.
Espinosa went over to the Hawaiian
Islands towards the end of his career
and had his last known bout just before
the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor.

- Chuck Johnston