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Thread: The Third God of War: Henry Armstrong

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    The Third God of War: Henry Armstrong

    At his peak, an act of God.


    The Third God of War: Henry Armstrong
    By Springs Toledo from Sweet Science


    “Batten down the hatches…!”
    ~ Chambers Journal, 1883

    
Henry Armstrong’s grandmother was a slave in Mississippi. She was owned by his Irish grandfather whose eyes twinkled at the sight of her. Their son grew up and married a woman who was half-Cherokee. Her name was “America.” The couple had fifteen children. The eleventh, Henry, inherited his father’s short stature and his mother’s strength and work ethic.

    The family moved to St. Louis when he was still a small child. At sixteen years old, he put on his father’s cap and overalls and walked down to the Missouri-Pacific Railroad and got a job –driving spikes with a sledgehammer like John Henry. One day a fateful gust of wind carried a discarded newspaper to his feet: “KID CHOCOLATE EARNS $75,000 FOR HALF HOUR’S WORK,” the headline declared. He quit the job, ran home, and told his grandmother that he was fixing to be a champion of the world. She looked him up and down and said “you ain’t no Jack Johnson!”

    And she was right. The kid with the baggy overalls and a hammer in his hand would become something else, something greater than Jack Johnson.

    Henry Armstrong would become a force of nature in the boxing ring. Like those boll weevils that came up and under his family’s crops back on the plantation, he’d come up and under his opponent’s guard and do to ribs what those critters did to crops. Like the Tombigbee River that overran its banks and killed their cattle, he’d flood his opponent. Press row would watch his relentless attack and compared it to a hurricane…

    It began as a tempest in a teapot in 1931, when the underfed teenager lost three out of his first four professional fights. Over the next five years he fought seven draws and suffered eight more setbacks, but stronger frames were getting knocked over. Quite suddenly his elements converged with swirling momentum, and the forecast turned severe for anyone in his path. Between January 1937 and October 1940, Armstrong posted 59 wins, 1 heavily disputed loss, 1 heavily disputed draw, and 51 knockouts. In only three years and ten months, Armstrong fought 61 times. That’s exactly how many fights Muhammad Ali had over the length of his career; and they weren’t scale versions of “bums of the month” either –his blows had multiple contenders and seven Hall of Famers spinning sideways in the ring.

    Armstrong reached peak intensity the same year that one of the most powerful natural events in recorded history slammed into the east coast of the United States.

    The Great Hurricane of 1938 made landfall on September 21st and cut a swath through Long Island, New York, and New England. Only a junior forecaster saw it coming, but his frantic relay was slapped down by his superiors at the U.S. Weather Bureau who wrongly expected the storm system to continue on a seaward path. So there was no notice, no preparation. It hit Long Island at a record speed and changed the landscape of the south coast forever. Over the next three days, the Blue Hills Conservatory in Massachusetts measured peak gusts at 186 mph and 50 foot waves crashed into the Gloucester shoreline. By the time it was over and the statistics were computed, seven hundred people had died, 63,000 were left homeless, and 2 billion trees were uprooted.
    
“Hurricane Henry” cut another kind of swath –through three weight divisions. His three managers, the famous Al Jolson, film noir actor George Raft, and Eddie Mead, came up with an idea to pilot him toward three crowns. In an era where boxing recognized only eight kings, toppling three of them would be an unparalleled feat …if he could do it.

    This is what it would take, they told Henry, to compete with the rampaging Joe Louis in a depressed market. “It sounds pretty good to me,” he replied.

    THE WORLD FEATHERWEIGHT TITLE, 29 October 1937
    Petey Sarron had been a professional for a dozen years and looked it, wrote Paul Mickelson, “his eyes are cut, his ears are hard and flat, and he’s broken his left hand three times, his right once.” He also happened to be the National Boxing Association featherweight champion, and in his prime at twenty-nine.

    Madison Square Garden’s 1937-1938 boxing season opened with Sarron matched up against the twenty-four-year-old Armstrong for recognition as the world featherweight champion. Sarron trained at Pioneer’s gym in Manhattan while Armstrong trained at Stillman’s gym, which may partly explain the 2˝ to 1 odds favoring the challenger –that or the fact that he was on a fifteen fight knockout streak. “This talk don’t scare me,” Sarron said, “I’m used to it. I found out in America, Africa, and Europe that nobody can beat me at 126 pounds.” Sarron was confident that Armstrong would fade. He reminded all and sundry that while he himself had gone fifteen rounds fifteen times, the challenger never had. “Armstrong isn’t fighting a punk this time,” he said.

    The veteran may have been expected to let youthful joie de vivre sap itself and then take over, but he defied that idea and waded boldly in to meet Armstrong on his own terms. He even managed to outland him with left hooks in the first round. He won the next few as well by inviting Armstrong to open up and then countering him. Armstrong made the mistake of trying too hard against a man who knew too much –he got stars in his eyes, went for a spectacular knockout, and got stars in his eyes. His wound-up shots breezed by the moving target although when they did happen to connect, they hurt. Before long, Sarron’s ribs began rattling like wind chimes under the blustering body attack, and by the fifth round his shutters were blown open. Armstrong mercilessly lashed him in a corner until the bell rang.

    A heavy right landed downstairs to begin the sixth and Sarron faced another surge. “Recovering somewhat,” The New York Times reported, “Sarron jumped at Armstrong and traded willingly with him.” His pride only preceded his fall. Armstrong shot a left to the body and then launched an overhand right that crashed on the champion’s jaw. Sarron “slumped to his knees and elbows” as if looking for a storm cellar under the ring, and was counted out.

    Petey Sarron fought a total of 151 times. The record indicates that he was stopped only once. Armstrong called the signature shot that did it “the blackout.”

    THE WORLD WELTERWEIGHT TITLE, 31 May 1938
    Armstrong’s managers intended to take the three world championship belts in an orderly fashion, but Al Weill, manager of the lightweight champion Lou Ambers, asked for a rain check. Welterweight king Barney Ross wasn’t about to give up a payday because of stormy weather.

    With a record of 72-3-3, Ross was an established master-boxer who, like Sarron, was never stopped. Born in New York City’s lower East Side, he stood second only to Benny Leonard among the celebrated Jewish champions who reigned from the 1910s through the 1930s and virtually disappeared after that. Barney Ross (nee Barnet David Rasofsky) was the last of the great ones.

    As a welterweight, he had not lost since the “Irish Lullaby” Jimmy McLarnin defeated him in 1934 –and Ross beat him before that bout and again after it. By the time he signed to face Armstrong, ennui had settled in because of the lack of challenges. He’d sneak tokes of a Chesterfield in the rubdown room and swig straight vodka at night after training. Not this time. Ross’s best fighting weight was 142 lbs and that was precisely what the scale said at the weigh-in. It was also the contractual limit for this match.

    Armstrong was having problems with the scale; simply put, he was no welterweight. In a sport where boxers ritualistically dried out, weighed in on the day of the fight, and then gorged at supper, Henry hurried to the scale with a belly full of water and beer, weighed in at only 133 lbs, and made off for the nearest toilet.

    The vast Jewish contingent in New York bet heavily on Ross, who entered the ring as a 7 to 5 favorite. The fistic fraternity was polled and Ross was favored by Jew and Gentile alike, 50-36, to outbox the smaller man.

    Every radio in the lower East Side was blaring as Barney Ross glided out of his corner at the opening bell. Working behind a varying jab and boxing at angles, Ross’s eyes were wide open in the early rounds as he strained to measure the bobbing and weaving whirlwind. Armstrong’s body attack was withering –he turned his fist around, crashed it into the champion’s ribs, and mixed it with left hooks and overhand rights. Ross’s strategy was to step inside the eye of the storm –inside the looping shots, and shift Armstrong off balance. The strategy was masterfully executed and Ross can be seen on film pivoting and turning Armstrong, but two problems soon became painfully clear. First, Ross assumed that his superior size would matter. It didn’t. The second was a question of pace. Henry could keep a hellish pace indefinitely. Barney could not. By round seven, the featherweight champion was overpowering the welterweight champion. Ross was still throwing that right uppercut-left hook combination, but he was wavering like a weather vane in November.

    It has become a convention among boxing historians to accede that the twenty-eight year old Ross got old in that bout, that he could no longer move as lively as he once did. That claim ignores what the film confirms –Armstrong’s physical strength and pressure wore Ross out, just like it did Sarron. By the end of the tenth round, Barney Ross was in big trouble.

    Only his heart and Armstrong’s favor allowed him to finish on his feet. Late in the fight, arguments abounded in both corners. Ross’s chief second had the towel in hand and was ready to throw it in when Ross warned “–don’t do it. I’m not quitting.” The referee came over and Barney had to make a promise to alleviate the official’s conscience. “Let me finish like a champion,” he said, “and I promise I’ll never fight again.” In the other corner Armstrong wanted to knock him out. “I don’t want to crucify him,” he said, “I don’t want to hurt him no more.”

    Armstrong would later claim that his seconds had gotten a signal to carry Barney for the last four rounds, and that the two champions had a conversation during a clinch that went something like this:

    Armstrong: “How you feel, Barney?”
    Ross: “I’m dead.”
    Armstrong: “Jab and run, and I’ll make it look good.”

    As the last bell clanged, Barney embraced Henry. “You’re the greatest,” he said. Close to it… Armstrong emerged from a battle against one of the finest boxers of the Golden Era with nothing more than a bruised knuckle.

    THE WORLD LIGHTWEIGHT TITLE, 17 August 1938
    New York’s own Lou Ambers was as tough as old boots. Known as the “Herkimer Hurricane,” he was a trainer’s dream, sighed Whitey Bimstein, because the closest thing he had to a vice was going to the movies. Ambers was also a supremely skilled in-fighter whose pride still swelled his chest decades later, “Oh Jesus,” he said in retirement, “I loved to fight.”

    Ringside seats for the Ambers-Armstrong title fight at Madison Square Garden cost $16.50, same-day admission was $1.15, and soon eighteen thousand were fidgeting in the seats. A collision of two hurricanes was imminent. Would Armstrong emerge with three simultaneous crowns? The odds said 3 to 1 that he would.

    Al Jolson plunked down a grand that said Ambers wouldn’t even see fifteen rounds. But Ambers was ready. “I’ll cut up Henry Armstrong so badly,” he predicted, “the referee will have to stop the fight.” Reporters chewed on their pencils at this. “Don’t worry about me,” he snapped, “wait until we’ve gone 15 rounds and then ask Armstrong how he liked it.”

    The two champions were standing toe-to-toe and slugging it out for a full minute by round two as the crowd screamed and hats flew. Ambers clinched effectively inside and landed sneak shots, but it was Armstrong who caught him pulling back in the fifth round with a long right. Ambers tumbled down. The referee counted to three when the bell rang and his corner men rushed out to revive him. In the next round, Armstrong threw combinations that didn’t end. Down went Ambers again.

    He took an eight count but nodded to his chief second, who by now had the spit bucket over his head.

    Then Ambers found an answer; as Armstrong bent forward and barreled in, he stood his ground and shot uppercuts one after another. Armstrong hurled punches low and the referee penalized him four rounds while Ambers knocked his mouthpiece out twice and severely split his lip. It was a war. In the fourteenth, Armstrong landed a right and Ambers reeled across the ring like a drunk chasing his hat, but he wouldn’t go down again.

    Armstrong said it as the “bloodiest fight I ever had in my life.” The canvas, according to Henry McLemore in press row, “resembled a gigantic butcher’s apron” and the fight was almost stopped. “I’m not going to bleed no more,” he promised the referee, and then spat out his mouthpiece and got back to work. He ended up swallowing about a pint of his own blood along with the iodine and collodion used to congeal the cut in his mouth. Delirium set in sometime in round fifteen.

    In Lou Amber’s dressing room, McLemore suspected that the fighter’s screws were punched loose. Lou sat naked, covered with welts, his eye an egg, croaking the old favorite “I Want a Girl Just Like the Girl That Married Dear Old Dad” –and talking ragtime. Swaying to and fro, he was still ducking overhands that weren’t coming anymore. “Whoop-a-doopy!” he said as McLemore made tracks for the other dressing room. Armstrong couldn’t even remember the fifteenth round. His handlers would tell him later how they had to peel him off of Ambers. A strange calm swept over him as he sat nursing a swollen left eye, five cuts over both eyes, and a mangled lip that would take fifteen stitches. Flashbulbs exploded in his face.

    Hurricane Henry had reached his peak –the fistic equivalent of a category five. After storming three divisions and dethroning three champions in less than a year, the man was spent …and the boxing landscape would never be the same.

    On 52nd Street the next morning, yellow cabs honk their discontent and clusters of pedestrians bustle to work outside Madison Square Garden. A gust carries a newspaper through space and time, sailing, swirling until it lands at the feet of a tall and rangy teenager in Central Park. “TRIPLE CHAMPION!” he reads, and his eyes flash with ambition. He finishes stretching and starts running down the winding bicycle path, against the wind.

    ***************

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    Re: The Third God of War: Henry Armstrong

    Henry Armstrong's Career Record:

    Henry Armstrong
    (Henry Melody Jackson)
    ("Homicide Hank")

    BORN December 12 1912; St. Louis, Missouri (Some sources report Columbus, Mississippi)
    DIED October 23 1988; Los Angeles, California
    HEIGHT 5-5 1/2
    WEIGHT 120-147 lbs
    MANAGERS Wirt Ross, Eddie Meade, George Moore
    TRAINER Al Silvani
    RECORD 149-21-9 (100 KO)
    Armstrong was dynamite in a small package; He was a high pressure, non-stop fighter who threw punches from the beginning to the end of every round; His goal was to knock his man out - if he didn't manage that, he certainly battered him thoroughly

    Henry held three world titles - Welterweight, Lightweight, Featherweight - in a period when only eight weight divisions existed; At the beginning, his performance was rather good but not sensational; However, when he hit stride in the mid 1930s, Armstrong was as good as anyone has ever been; During 1937, he was 27-0 with 26 knockouts; In 1938, he was 14-0 with 10 knockouts; From December, 1936 until September, 1940, Henry compiled a 59-1-1 record (51 KOs) competing against the best in the world

    Charley Rose ranked Armstrong as the #6 All-Time Welterweight; Nat Fleischer ranked him as the #8 All-Time Welterweight; Herb Goldman ranked Armstrong as the #4 All-Time Lightweight; He was inducted into the Ring Boxing Hall of Fame in 1954 and the International Boxing Hall of Fame in 1990

    1931
    Jul 27 Al Iovino North Braddock, Pa LK 3
    Jul 30 Sammy Burns Millvale, Pa W 6
    -Some sources report 8/07/31

    1932
    Aug 30 Eddie Trujillo Los Angeles, Ca L 4
    Sep 27 Al Greenfield Los Angeles, Ca L 4
    Maximo "Max" Tarley Los Angeles, Ca W 4
    -Some sources report "W 4"
    Vince Trujillo Los Angeles, Ca KO 2
    Dec 13 Gene Espinosa Los Angeles, Ca W 4
    Dec 31 Young Corpus Pismo Beach, Ca W 4

    1933
    Feb 3 Johnny "Mickey" Ryan Ventura, Ca W 6
    Feb 17 George Dundee Ventura, Ca W 6
    Mar 21 Paul Wangley Los Angeles, Ca KO 4
    Apr 28 Perfecto Lopez Ventura, Ca W 6
    May 24 "Young" Bud Taylor Los Angeles, Ca KO 2
    May 31 Maximo "Max" Tarley Los Angeles, Ca KO 3
    Jun 7 Ricky Hall Pismo Beach, Ca TK 3
    Jul 11 Baby Manuel Los Angeles, Ca L 6
    Aug 8 Bobby Calmes Los Angeles, Ca KO 5
    Aug 30 Hoyt Jones Los Angeles, Ca D 4
    Sep 5 Perfecto Lopez Los Angeles, Ca D 4
    Sep 28 Perfecto Lopez Los Angeles, Ca W 8
    -Some sources report "Ventura, Ca"
    Oct 11 Perfecto Lopez Los Angeles, Ca D 4
    Oct 19 Johnny Granone Sacramento, Ca TK 6
    -Some sources report "KO 5"
    Nov 3 Kid Moro Pismo Beach, Ca W 10
    -Some sources report "D 10"
    Nov 23 Kid Moro Stockton, Ca D 10
    Dec 14 Gene Espinosa Sacramento, Ca KO 7

    1934
    Jan 26 Baby Manuel Sacramento, Ca W 10
    Feb 13 Benny Pelz Los Angeles, Ca W 6
    Mar 8 Perfecto Lopez Los Angeles, Ca W 8
    -Some sources report "Bakersfield, Ca"
    Mar 17 Young Danny Los Angeles, Ca KO 1
    -Some sources report 3/27/34
    May 4 Kid Moro Watsonville, Ca D 10
    May 22 Johnny DeFoe Los Angeles, Ca KO 5
    Jun 5 Vicente Torres Los Angeles, Ca W 4
    Jun 14 Davey Abad Sacramento, Ca W 10
    Jul 17 Perfecto Lopez Los Angeles, Ca W 6
    Aug 28 Perfecto Lopez Los Angeles, Ca KO 5
    Sep 7 Joe Sanchez Ventura, Ca KO 4
    -Some sources report 9/07/33
    Sep 13 Maximo "Max" Tarley Los Angeles, Ca KO 3
    Sep 28 Perfecto Lopez Ventura, Ca W 8
    Nov 3 Alberto "Baby" Arizmendi Mexico City, Mex L 10
    -Some sources report "L 12"
    Dec 2 Joe Conde Mexico City, Mex KO 7
    Dec 15 Ventura Arana Mexico City, Mex KO 5

    1935
    Jan 2 Alberto "Baby" Arizmendi Mexico City, Mex L 12
    -Featherweight Championship of the World
    (as recognized by California and Mexico);
    Some sources report 1/1/35
    Feb 15 Rodolfo "Baby" Casanova Mexico City, Mex LF 5
    -Some sources report "LF 4"
    Mar 19 Salvador Hernandez Los Angeles, Ca KO 2
    Mar 31 Davey Abad Mexico City, Mex L 10
    Apr 6 Tully Corvo Los Angeles, Ca KO 5
    Apr 16 Frankie Covelli Los Angeles, Ca W 8
    May 10 Mark Diaz Ventura, Ca W 8
    -Some sources report 5/10/34
    May 28 Davey Abad Los Angeles, Ca W 10
    Jun 25 Varias Milling Los Angeles, Ca W 10
    Sep 8 Perfecto Lopez San Francisco, Ca D 8
    -Some sources report 9/18/35
    Oct 21 Lester Marston Oakland, Ca TK 7
    Nov 12 Leo Lomelli Oakland, Ca TK 6
    Nov 27 Midget Wolgast Oakland, Ca W 10
    Dec 6 Alton Black Reno, Nv TK 8
    -Some sources report 9/13/35

    1936
    Jan 1 Joe Conde Mexico City, Mex L 10
    Feb 26 Ritchie Fontaine Oakland, Ca L 10
    Mar 31 Ritchie Fontaine Los Angeles, Ca W 10
    May 19 Bobby "Pancho" Leyvas Los Angeles, Ca TK 4
    Jun 22 Johnny DeFoe Butte, Mt W 10
    Aug 4 Alberto "Baby" Arizmendi Los Angeles, Ca W 10
    -Featherweight Championship of the World
    (as recognized by California and Mexico)
    Aug 18 Juan Zurita Los Angeles, Ca KO 4
    -Some sources report 8/28/36
    Sep 3 Elmer "Buzz" Brown Portland, Or W 10
    Sep 8 Dommy Ganzon Sacramento, Ca KO 1
    -Some sources report "Stockton, Ca"
    Oct 27 Mike Belloise Los Angeles, Ca W 10
    Nov 2 Gene Espinosa Los Angeles, Ca KO 1
    Nov 17 Joey Alcanter St. Louis, Mo TK 6
    Dec 3 Tony Chavez St. Louis, Mo LF 8

    1937
    Jan 1 Rodolfo "Baby" Casanova Mexico City, Mex KO 3
    Jan 19 Tony Chavez Los Angeles, Ca KO 10
    Feb 2 Wilfred "Moon" Mullins Los Angeles, Ca TK 2
    Feb 19 Varias Milling San Diego, Ca KO 4
    -Some sources report "Hollywood, Ca"
    Mar 2 "California" Joe Rivers Los Angeles, Ca KO 4
    Mar 12 Mike Belloise New York, NY TK 4
    Mar 19 Aldo Spoldi New York, NY W 10
    Apr 6 Pete DeGrasse Los Angeles, Ca KO 10
    May 4 Frankie Klick Los Angeles, Ca TK 4
    May 28 Wally Hally Los Angeles, Ca TK 4
    Jun 9 Mark Diaz Pasadena, Ca KO 4
    Jun 15 Jackie Carter Los Angeles, Ca KO 4
    Jul 8 Alf Blatch New York, NY TK 3
    Jul 19 Lew Massey Woodhaven, NY TK 4
    Jul 27 Benny Bass Philadelphia, Pa KO 4
    Aug 13 Eddie Brink New York, NY KO 3
    Aug 16 Johnny Cabello Washington, DC TK 2
    Aug 31 Orville Drouillard Detroit, Mi TK 5
    Sep 9 Charley Burns Millvale, Pa KO 4
    Sep 16 Johnny DeFoe New York, NY TK 4
    Sep 21 Bobby Dean Youngstown, Oh KO 1
    Oct 18 Joe Marciente Philadelphia, Pa KO 3
    Oct 29 Petey Sarron New York, NY KO 6
    -Featherweight Championship of the World
    Nov 19 Billy Beauhuld New York, NY TK 5
    Nov 23 Joey Brown Buffalo, NY KO 2
    Dec 6 Tony Chavez Cleveland, Oh TK 1
    Dec 12 Johnny Jones New Orleans, La KO 2

    1938
    Jan 12 Enrico Venturi New York, NY KO 6
    Jan 21 Frankie Castillo Phoenix, Az TK 3
    Jan 22 Tommy "K.O." Brown Tucson, Az KO 2
    Feb 1 Albert "Chalky" Wright Los Angeles, Ca TK 3
    Feb 9 Al Citrino San Francisco, Ca TK 4
    Feb 25 Everett Rightmire Chicago, Il TK 4
    -Some sources report "TK 3"
    Feb 28 Charley Burns Minneapolis, Mn TK 2
    Mar 15 Alberto "Baby" Arizmendi Los Angeles, Ca W 10
    Mar 25 Eddie Zivic Detroit, Mi TK 4
    Mar 30 Lew Feldman New York, NY KO 5
    May 31 Barney Ross Long Island City, NY W 15
    -Welterweight Championship of the World
    Aug 17 Lou Ambers New York, NY W 15
    -Lightweight Championship of the World
    Nov -Armstrong relinquished the Featherweight Championship
    of the World
    Nov 25 Ceferino Garcia New York, NY W 15
    -Welterweight Championship of the World
    Dec 5 Al Manfredo Cleveland, Oh TK 3
    -Welterweight Championship of the World

    1939
    Jan 10 Alberto "Baby" Arizmendi Los Angeles, Ca W 10
    -Welterweight Championship of the World
    Feb 6 George Henry Milwaukee, Wi EX 4
    Feb 7 George Henry La Crosse, Wi EX 4
    Feb 8 George Henry Racine, Wi EX 3
    Feb 8 "Indian" Billy Lee Racine, Wi EX 1
    -The previous 2 bouts were held the same date
    Mar 4 Bobby Pacho Havana, Cuba TK 4
    -Welterweight Championship of the World
    Mar 16 Lew Feldman St. Louis, Mo KO 1
    -Welterweight Championship of the World
    Mar 31 Davey Day New York, NY TK 12
    -Welterweight Championship of the World
    May 25 Ernie Roderick London, Eng W 15
    -Welterweight Championship of the World
    Aug 22 Lou Ambers Bronx, NY L 15
    -Lightweight Championship of the World
    Oct 9 Al Manfredo Des Moines, Ia TK 4
    -Welterweight Championship of the World
    Oct 13 Howard Scott Minneapolis, Mn KO 2
    -Welterweight Championship of the World
    Oct 20 Ritchie Fontaine Seattle, Wa TK 3
    -Welterweight Championship of the World
    Oct 24 Jimmy Garrison Los Angeles, Ca W 10
    -Welterweight Championship of the World
    Oct 30 Bobby Pacho Denver, Co TK 4
    -Welterweight Championship of the World
    Dec 11 Jimmy Garrison Cleveland, Oh KO 7
    -Welterweight Championship of the World

    1940
    Jan 4 Joe Ghnouly St. Louis, Mo KO 5
    -Welterweight Championship of the World
    Jan 24 Pedro Montanez New York, NY TK 9
    -Welterweight Championship of the World
    Mar 1 Ceferino Garcia Los Angeles, Ca D 10
    -Some sources report Middleweight Championship of the World
    Apr 26 Paul Junior Boston, Ma TK 7
    -Welterweight Championship of the World
    May 24 Ralph Zanelli Boston, Ma TK 5
    -Welterweight Championship of the World
    Jun 21 Paul Junior Portland, Me TK 3
    -Welterweight Championship of the World
    Jul 17 Lew Jenkins New York, NY TK 6
    -Some sources report this as a Welterweight Championship
    of the World contest
    Sep 23 Phil Furr Washington, DC KO 4
    -Welterweight Championship of the World
    Oct 4 Fritzie Zivic New York, NY L 15
    -Welterweight Championship of the World

    1941
    Jan 17 Fritzie Zivic New York, NY LT 12
    -Welterweight Championship of the World

    1942
    Jun 1 Johnny Taylor San Jose, Ca TK 4
    Jun 24 Richard "Sheik" Rangel Oakland, Ca W 10
    Jul 3 Reuben Shank Denver, Co L 10
    Jul 20 Joe Ibarra Sacramento, Ca TK 3
    Aug 3 Aldo Spoldi San Francisco, Ca TK 7
    Aug 13 Jackie Burke Ogden, Ut W 10
    Aug 26 Rodolfo Ramirez Oakland, Ca KO 8
    Sep 7 Johnny Taylor Pittman, Nv TK 3
    Sep 14 Leo Rodak San Francisco, Ca TK 8
    Sep 30 Earl Turner Oakland, Ca KO 4
    Oct 13 Juan Zurita Los Angeles, Ca KO 2
    Oct 26 Fritzie Zivic San Francisco, Ca W 10
    Dec 4 Lew Jenkins Portland, Or TK 8
    Dec 14 Saverio Turiello San Francisco, Ca TK 4

    1943
    Jan 5 Jimmy McDaniels Los Angeles, Ca W 10
    Mar 2 Willie Joyce Los Angeles, Ca L 10
    Mar 8 Tippy Larkin San Francisco, Ca KO 2
    Mar 22 Al Tribuani Philadelphia, Pa W 10
    Apr 2 Beau Jack New York, NY L 10
    Apr 30 Saverio Turiello Washington, DC TK 5
    May 7 Tommy Jessup Boston, Ma KO 1
    May 24 Maxie Shapiro Philadelphia, Pa TK 7
    Jun 11 Sammy Angott New York, NY W 10
    Jul 24 Willie Joyce Hollywood, Ca W 10
    Aug 6 Jimmy Garrison Portland, Or W 10
    Aug 14 "Mexican" Joey Silva Spokane, Wa W 10
    Aug 27 "Sugar" Ray Robinson New York, NY L 10

    1944
    Jan 14 Aldo Spoldi Portland, Or KO 3
    Jan 26 Saverio Turiello Kansas City, Mo KO 7
    Feb 7 Lew Hanbury Washington, DC KO 3
    Feb 23 Jimmy Garrison Kansas City, Mo TK 5
    Feb 29 Jackie Byrd Des Moines, Ia KO 4
    Mar 14 Johnny Jones Miami, Fl KO 5
    Mar 20 Frankie Wills Washington, DC W 10
    Mar 24 Ralph Zanelli Boston, Ma W 10
    Apr 25 John Thomas Los Angeles, Ca W 10
    May 16 Ralph Zanelli Boston, Ma W 10
    May 22 Aaron Perry Washington, DC TK 6
    Jun 2 Willie Joyce Chicago, Il L 10
    Jun 15 Al "Bummy" Davis New York, NY TK 2
    Jun 21 Nick Latsios Washington, DC W 10
    Jul 4 John Thomas Los Angeles, Ca L 10
    Jul 14 Luther "Slugger" White Hollywood, Ca D 10
    Aug 21 Willie Joyce San Francisco, Ca W 10
    Sep 15 Aldo Spoldi St. Louis, Mo KO 2
    Nov 4 Mike Belloise Portland, Or KO 4

    1945
    Jan 17 Chester Slider Oakland, Ca D 10
    Feb 6 Genaro Rojo Los Angeles, Ca W 10
    Feb 14 Chester Slider Oakland, Ca L 10


    *** The Following Bouts Are Reported But Not Confirmed ***

    1933
    Jan Steve Harkey W 4

    1934
    Dec 21 Midget Wolgast San Francisco, Ca W 10

    1936
    Apr 17 Alton Black Reno, Nv KO 8
    Record Courtesy of Tracy Callis, Historian, International Boxing Research Organization

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