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Thread: Hopkins vs Jones ll: Just How Stupid Do They Think We Are?

  1. #61
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    Re: Jones-Hopkins: The Worst Side of Boxing by Dr. Margaret Goodman

    At the pace he's going Roy is certain to end up a "mumbling, incoherent wreck".
    Just because he wasn't a palooka by no means does it justifify this bout.

    GorDoom

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    Re: Jones-Hopkins: The Worst Side of Boxing by Dr. Margaret Goodman

    other than the decade old victory roy holds over bernard this is not even a good match up in regards to recent performances.

    hopkins, who is an ageless marvel, has beaten or competed closely with every top fighter he has faced the past few years. roy jones just got clubbed in one round, as shown before that he can no longer take a punch...... what the hell is there to think about ?

    obviously if this was not jones- hopkins this fight would not be made because on paper it is not competitive.

    also this hype i have been hearing that it is going to be a 60-40 split if one of them wins by knockout is highly suspect. to me it is a flat out lie and a marketing scam or these two have struck a deal. roy, for all his bluster, is not that dumb. how many people have ko'd bhop ? jones could not do it in his prime. so having just been blasted out in one by a danny green type roy is going to make that bet against hopkins ?? its even money i have a daughter that could ko roy at this point... ok ok but.... give me a break.

    greg

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    Re: Jones-Hopkins: The Worst Side of Boxing by Dr. Margaret Goodman


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    Re: Jones-Hopkins: The Worst Side of Boxing by Dr. Margaret Goodman

    Excellent article, Tom. Thanks for posting the link. Really good stuff!

    GorDoom

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    Re: Jones-Hopkins: The Worst Side of Boxing by Dr. Margaret Goodman

    The thought of this fight makes me sick. Jones has been embarrasing himself in all of his fights since he lost to Tarver, even the fights he has won. I've been a fan of Roys since I watched him get robbed in the olympics and I cant believe someone that is close to him wouldnt do whatever it takes to stop this proud man from fighting ever again.

    Goodmans article decribing jones with deteriorating balance and coordination is spot on. His entire body is stiff and he shuffles his feet. He reminds me a bit of Ali in his last several fights. I know Roy never took the blows that Ali did or maybe even most fighters but he aint right physically and someone needs to force him to quit.

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    Re: Jones-Hopkins: The Worst Side of Boxing by Dr. Margaret Goodman

    Jones seems fine, he got caught cold against Green as he took a risk and didn't warm up before the fight but he was going to KO Calzaghe but didn't press the fight. Calzaghe was done and dusted but Jones made a mistake and didn't go for the quick KO.

    He has hardly been hit in his career.

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    Re: Jones-Hopkins: The Worst Side of Boxing by Dr. Margaret Goodman

    Pete, are you being facetious with your last entry?, or are you just smoking copious amounts of crack? Roy was a once great fighter, but I can't remember ever seeing a fighter who looked more "done" than Roy has in his last few fights. Danny Green is AWFUL and knocked him out in 1. And he won less than 30 seconds of the fight against Calzaghe. (see my previous posts to see how little I think of Joe C's abilities). Poor Roy needs to stop, or he will be permanently hurt.

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    Re: Jones-Hopkins: The Worst Side of Boxing by Dr. Margaret Goodman

    If Roy was so physically deteriorated to the extent that he shouldn't be allowed to fight he would've never beaten the likes of Hamshaw and Lacy, who are not A class but B-level fighters in this era.

    The only non-A class guy Roy has lost to was Green in a fight in which he took a big shot to the temple early, which can put ANYONE in trouble, particuarly when they are caught cold like that. So going the distance vs Calzaghe and then getting stopped in 3 fights, 2 vs guys who at the time would go on to be THE champs in the 175 lb division in Tarver and Johnson means you shouldn't be allowed to fight despite passing all required physical and neurological tests? Come on, that's ridiculous.

    In that case Wlad Klitschko, on something like a 9 fight winning streak, should've never been sanctioned to fight after losing by KO to two 2nd class pugilists in Sanders and Brewster in a 4 fight span.

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    Re: Jones-Hopkins: The Worst Side of Boxing by Dr. Margaret Goodman

    To be clear: Green's not a bad fighter; calling him awful is as crack smoking as anything else written here. His career kind of went off the rails after he got monkeyed with in Beyer I, but he's had some solid wins. He's not a "P4P!" type guy, but he's a solid world class fighter.

    On a different note, there have now been a couple multi-response threads dumping on this fight (and making some of the typical 'this is why boxing is in the crapper' blah blah statements) with much less attention paid to a solid Jr. Welter fight tonight, the announcing of the first unification fight of any kind at Bantamweight in a couple generations (Hasegawa-Montiel) etc.

    Makes one wonder sometimes if boxing suffers because its ardent lovers spend more time focused on negatives than positives.

    Screw this fight. Ignore it. Go tell a friend about Yohnny Perez-Abner Mares in May. Invite someone over next week so they can see almost 50K watching a fight in Texas and then get amped for what will likely be the same sized crowd this summer at Yankee Stadium for Cotto-Foreman. Hell, rent the web PPV for Klit-Chambers, link it to your TV, and let the latest stadium Heavyweight fight at least impress them with crowd size. Host Super Six parties.

    Heck, just start talking up the string of quality fights on ESPN2 so far in 2010. No one has to pay extra for that unless they don't have cable.
    Last edited by Crold1; 03-06-2010 at 03:15 PM.

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    Re: Jones-Hopkins: The Worst Side of Boxing by Dr. Margaret Goodman

    Have you people ever lost the plot. Do you think these two at this time in their career give a flying fk what you think or Goodman thinks? They dont. Meaningless to you lot but not to them.

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    Grebb

    Who is arguing otherwise?

    I'm betting if Chacon and Limon were in the same room today, there woudl be enough animosity that the two would love to square off agian and especially if they could get a payday out of the deal.

    And there would be someone slimey enough to try and pull off the promotion.

    But SHOULD fans of the sport or a Margaret Goodman keep their mouths shut if they see such a matchup being an abomination or BECUASE Chacon and Limon could care less what anyone else thinks and THEY think a bout has meaning TO THEM, should we all simply remain silent?

    IMO, this fight not only should NOT happen, I think the bout is going to suck. Even BEFORE the Green KO, this was going to be a horrific bout. From a DULL stand point.

    In their PRIMES this bout sucked. With both being Even MORE cautious and less willing to take chances, and the triggers they WANT to pull, they can't even pull them, WHY would this be entertaing or interesting 18 years later?

    IMO anyone here who lays down even a penny for this fight, is as much a part of the problem our sport is facing as those who actually are staging it.

    Hawk

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    Re: Jones-Hopkins: The Worst Side of Boxing by Dr. Margaret Goodman

    Hawk, I agree the fight will suck. But not get sanctioned? I don't find a compelling argument there. Especially since it's "suckiness' will probably ensure both fighters emerge from the low-intensity affair mark-free . . .

    If any fight should not be sanctioned due to concerns about the health of the fighters it's the upcoming Vasquez-Marquez IV.

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    Re: Jones-Hopkins: The Worst Side of Boxing by Dr. Margaret Goodman

    Well boredom has yet to kill anyone, so why not.

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    Unfortunately

    I'm forced to agree with you re the sanctioning.

    ASs much as I don't want to.

    My position is from a "suck" factor.

    Hawk

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    Re: Jones-Hopkins: The Worst Side of Boxing by Dr. Margaret Goodman

    Hawk.

    Point is they dont care what we the public thinks. Lets face it....of course this fight should have happened years ago but it didn't.

    Roy has been a thorn in Hops mind for a decade. He probably had nightmares for ten years.

    If they want to sort it out now I say let them and then they can both ride off into the sunset and retire...hopefully.

    This fight imo is going to be a lot more competitive then people think largely because Roy is firmly attached to Hops brain pan. Usually its Hop that gets into the other guys head but not this time. In addition Hop is a 45 year old economical counter puncher and as they say, styles make fights.

    No I am not going to pay for this fight. I will watch it for free.

    Bottom line is that these two owe nothing to the sport. Both men have accomplished much and given their lives to it. If they want to duke it out as a swan song so be it.

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    SHould Chacon and Limon

    Be allowed to fight, as THEIR Swan song?

    Heck, let's say it's 1989 and they wanted to go out agianst each other?

    SHOULD it be allowed?

    Jones and Hopkins don't OWE us anything? I'm not saying they do. And I'm Not asking anything from either one of them.

    Hopkins wants this bout for two reasons: Revenge and it's the only money bout for him.

    Jones wants it for One reason. It's the only money bout for him.

    Boxers fight for fans.

    If No one bought this or it promoters didn't think anyone would, this fight doesn't happen.

    This is a name recognition bout only.

    And the FIRST bout sucked badly. I have ZERO idea why there is ANY interest level in it (and yes, boxers do fight for the fans as it IS the fans who pay for their purse.

    Is there a medical reason to NOT allow a sanctioning for this fight? No there isn't probably. Is there a legal way to block it and prevent it from happening? Probably not.

    Does that mean it still SHOULD happen? No.

    But I would HOPE that such a bout would never get off the ground is becuase there was NO interest what so ever in a rematch of a Shitty bout, happening 18 years later when both fighters are in their 40's and one fighter, while not medically unfit to fight, still is a shop worn, eons past his best, fighting from memory only type of fighter.

    Not only will I not buy this, I won't even seek out the result.

    This bout is one of the most irrelevant bouts to get any amount of press that I can ever think of.

    I've already spent too much energy talkiing about it.

    Hawk

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    Re: Jones-Hopkins: The Worst Side of Boxing by Dr. Margaret Goodman

    Thats your opinion and you are entitled to it.

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    Greb

    I initially responded in this thread based on this post of yours:

    "Have you people ever lost the plot. Do you think these two at this time in their career give a flying fk what you think or Goodman thinks? They dont. Meaningless to you lot but not to them."

    It reads to me that you actually HAD a problem with people's opinions on this bout, that differed from yours.

    Yes, I DO have a problem with the bout.

    Not from a "SHould it be sanctioned" perspective. But should it be, the fight it self, a topic worth discussing, given the original was abysmally dull and the rematch 18 years later has NO chance of being any more entertaining. In fact, odds are it will be significantly worse.

    That is MY opinion on the bout.

    Hawk

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    Re: Greb

    Quote Originally Posted by hawk5ins
    I initially responded in this thread based on this post of yours:

    "Have you people ever lost the plot. Do you think these two at this time in their career give a flying fk what you think or Goodman thinks? They dont. Meaningless to you lot but not to them."

    It reads to me that you actually HAD a problem with people's opinions on this bout, that differed from yours.

    Yes, I DO have a problem with the bout.

    Not from a "SHould it be sanctioned" perspective. But should it be, the fight it self, a topic worth discussing, given the original was abysmally dull and the rematch 18 years later has NO chance of being any more entertaining. In fact, odds are it will be significantly worse.

    That is MY opinion on the bout.

    Hawk

    Thats right they dont give a shit, They are both a step away from retirement and like I said if they want to make a few bucks on the way out the door after all they have given to the sport then so be it. If people hate the thoughts of it then dont watch it.

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    Re: Jones-Hopkins: The Worst Side of Boxing by Dr. Margaret Goodman

    Well, the first fight sucked mainly because RJJ was so damn fast & both are quick, safety-first counter punchers. Since then it's been proven time & time again that this old version of BHop needs the right partner to make for an entertaining fight or else it winds up being a televised form of Ambien. The same goes for RJJ. And since neither guy is a good candidate for the other to make this happen, the forecast for this fight between 2 guys with little left in the leg department is a high probability of posing with a strong chance of suck - but BHop will win because he is a little fresher & can take a punch (or at least still avoid one).

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    THen agian Greb

    When did EITHER fighter ever give a shit what the fans thought of them?

    Which makes me wonder WHY anyone gives a shit about this fight.

    Some things in this wonderful sport of ours, defy logic.

    Interest in this fight DEFIES logic.

    Hawk

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    Re: THen agian Greb

    Quote Originally Posted by hawk5ins
    When did EITHER fighter ever give a shit what the fans thought of them?

    Which makes me wonder WHY anyone gives a shit about this fight.

    Some things in this wonderful sport of ours, defy logic.

    Interest in this fight DEFIES logic.

    Hawk

    So then whats your point? Its shaped like a pretzel. I never designed it. "Interest" is a matter of opinion. Thats why you post here right? It makes no difference to me in the boxing world at this point. The point is missed in that it makes no difference to them either. Not sure why this is so difficult to understand. Dont watch it. Pay no heed to it. Its a meaningless fight.
    Last edited by Greb01; 03-09-2010 at 12:57 AM.

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    Re: Jones-Hopkins: The Worst Side of Boxing by Dr. Margaret Goodman

    Cough-*Nelson Fenech III was worse*Cough-Cough...

    The sports inability to deal with any issue universally is going to see this sort of thing continue forever.

    They say a fighters punch is the last thing to go, I would almost argue that the ego lasts longer than even the punch, when we're talking Hopkins and Jones, their hunger for the limelight has a longer shelf life than nuclear waste.

    The only way I can possibly envisage any sort of change to the sport along these lines and with other contentious issues like drug testing and even hand wrap stuff, is to institute an overarching body controlled by the sports main detractor. The medical fraternity. But that's broadening the scope of the post a bit too far.

    How fair is setting a sanctioned limit on age to the CBZ bretheren? Like Dr Goodman describes in her article above, there is no standard, no magic number. A knee jerk number would be 45 to my thinking, but would you let or want a Meldrick Taylor fighting at 45? Or even as suggested above, Marquez or Vasquez?

    It's a hard question for any fan IMO.

    How much blood do we expect from fighters in a sport where going out on your sheild is pretty much expected while any less is often met with accusations of being a "quitter"?

    Likewise, that warrior who has performed for the crowd for his entire career is then being told to hang em up, do they have a right to feel indignant when the same fans calling for blood start saying that they're too old and should hang em up?

    Hopkins and Archie Moore are the exception, not the rule. I feel more inclined that the sport should have an age limit so that you know there's some measure to protect a fighter when his ego outlasts his ability to read the writing on the wall.

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    Re: Jones-Hopkins: The Worst Side of Boxing by Dr. Margaret Goodman

    Quote Originally Posted by diggity
    Well, the first fight sucked mainly because RJJ was so damn fast & both are quick, safety-first counter punchers. Since then it's been proven time & time again that this old version of BHop needs the right partner to make for an entertaining fight or else it winds up being a televised form of Ambien. The same goes for RJJ. And since neither guy is a good candidate for the other to make this happen, the forecast for this fight between 2 guys with little left in the leg department is a high probability of posing with a strong chance of suck - but BHop will win because he is a little fresher & can take a punch (or at least still avoid one).

    Bingo.

    That calls the bout to a T. The guy holding the camera has an easy job. So do the instant replay guys in the booth. The only risk taking I see associated with this bout is by the company trying to sell it as a PPV.

    But the pre-fight talk with these 2 will have an entertainment value 5 fold of the actual fight.

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    Re: Jones-Hopkins: The Worst Side of Boxing by Dr. Margaret Goodman

    The obtuseness of boxing fans never ceases to confound. How anybody can find this a valid, compelling, match, wobbles the mind ...

    GorDoom

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    Bernard Hopkins – The Executioner in Winter: Parts 1,2 & 3by Thomas Gerbasi

    Bernard Hopkins – The Executioner in Winter: Part 1
    by Thomas Gerbasi from Boxing Scene

    Over ten years as middleweight champion. 20 title defenses. A resume over 40 that is better than most compiled by fighters ten years his junior. And that’s not counting the fame and the money that Bernard Hopkins now calls his own.

    Add in that he achieved all these things while fighting a system designed to keep him quiet and under control, and it makes the accomplishments even more impressive.

    So you would expect that it’s about time for Hopkins, at 45 years old, to stop, look around, and take a whiff of the proverbial roses. Then again, that wouldn’t be his style.

    “I do reflect, but I don’t reflect long because when I’m running, if I look back that slows me up and they can get me,” he told BoxingScene.com.

    “They” can take many forms for ‘The Executioner’. It could be the younger, stronger, faster, but not wiser, opponents lining up to take a shot at the 40-something warrior. It could be an industry that still may be smarting over the statements and stands he has made over the years, or it could be something we don’t even know about. But what we do know is that the idea of “They” coming to get him keeps him sharp and it’s what he thinks about when he does look back at his 22 years in the boxing game.

    “You know what I reflect on?” he asks. “Fighting Clinton Mitchell in May of 1988 and losing a four round decision. 22 years later, as of right now, I have my faculties and some of my memory, and to still be in the mentality of even though I’m financially set and my family is set, I haven’t made that become my God to the point where I forgot. I will be that same guy out there, hollering and screaming about something I believe is wrong.”

    It’s almost hard to believe, that after earning multi-million dollar paydays, taking an ownership stake in Golden Boy Promotions, and getting a level of respect from his peers and from fans that few could hope for, Hopkins still has the fire to fight back. Of course, then he opens his mouth and it’s clear that whatever is on his mind will soon be fired out into the world, making him not only boxing’s best soundbite, but a lightning rod for controversy. Not what you would expect from someone who is one of the sport’s power brokers.

    “I have people that I respect and who are close to me in my camp, and they gotta be kinda careful about saying things to me because I know I’ll turn on them in a minute,” he said. “So it’s more like ‘Bernard, you’re in corporate America now, you’re with Golden Boy…’”

    You can hear the answer coming…

    “No, no, no, no,” he blurts. “Once I become one hundred percent corporate and I still consider myself a fighter, I’m dead in the water. I’m done. Not only as a sell-out, but on the athletic tip, it would take away 80 percent of my psyche, of what’s been motivating me for many, many years – to be against the establishment. So to become part of the establishment, I would not have that fire in my belly as I have right now.”

    That fire has carried him to wins over Howard Eastman, Antonio Tarver, Winky Wright, Kelly Pavlik, and Enrique Ornelas – all taking place after he turned 40 years old. Three losses also dot his 40+ record, but each one – two against Jermain Taylor and one against Joe Calzaghe – were controversial verdicts which many people believed should have gone in Hopkins’ favor.

    On April 3rd, he will climb the mountain once again to take on the man who beat him in his first world middleweight title fight in 1993, Roy Jones Jr. Back before his ninth round knockout of Oscar De La Hoya in 2004, 11 years after the first bout with Jones, I asked him about that defeat and he told me, “I made a vow to myself which I’ve held up for 11 years now, that I’ll never lose on my feet again. I train that way, I think that way, and it’s been 11 years. Some people don’t think that’s important. I think it’s very important to make a statement and to work hard to live by it.”

    Judging by that statement, you could say that Roy Jones – in a roundabout way – has contributed to Hopkins’ eventual success. But when reminded of the quote last week, Hopkins says that my interpretation of what he said then is way off.

    “I believe a lot of that had to do with Bernard Hopkins’ history with the boxing powers and the mob – M-O-B – in the business that I deal with,” he explains. “And I say that with sincerity from my heart. It had nothing to do with any particular fighter, especially Roy Jones Jr. And when I use the word ‘mob’, I don’t mean the old days of the 50’s and 40’s. To me, it’s a group of people with power to be able to use what you don’t do in the ring – win, win, win – to bury you and to monopolize you and to not give you an opportunity to be able to show that fighters who became great came from adversity.”

    “That statement, I remember it as clear as if I said it yesterday or an hour ago,” Hopkins continues, “because I understood all the way back to 1999, when I stood up at the senate hearings talking about boxing, talking about the corruption, talking about the double standards, about the conflicts of interest that run from the top to the bottom of boxing. And once I made that statement, I realized, pertaining to some of the phone calls I got, that it won’t be in my best interests if I go down there to New York City to speak in front of Eliot Spitzer, the ex-attorney general, and Senator McCain. I haven’t been robbed of that memory, and I thank God that I can reflect on that in 2010. That’s why I made that statement and a couple of other statements because I know, even to today, and believe it or not even more today, Bernard Hopkins must go into the ring knowing that my lifeline is always to go in there to win on my feet. That doesn’t necessarily mean that I have to always get the win politically, and not getting it politically proves me right all the time – the Jermain Taylor fight, the Joe Calzaghe fight. There always seems to be a mystery or a doubt – other than the Roy Jones fight in ’93 – of who won or who didn’t win. When you’ve got those intangibles wrapped up in it, it’s not considered a clear victory on their end. And so I’ve realized that it made me even more popular in some cases, and it’s made me more of a target in some cases. It really had nothing to do with Roy Jones.”

    Point taken.

    Yet while the losses to Taylor and Calzaghe were controversial, odds are that they were just part and parcel with life in the fight game. No one’s saying lightweight contender Ali Funeka was stiffed in his 2009 fight against Joan Guzman because it was political – it was just a bad decision.

    Hopkins isn’t buying that rationale though, and believing what he does has made him who he is – not only as a fighter, but as a man. And if you’re looking for the magic formula as to why he’s become boxing’s version of Benjamin Button, seemingly getting younger with each passing year, it’s because he has never changed his mindset.

    Most fighters, when they find success and get secure in life outside the ring, get softer as they get older. It’s the old Marvin Hagler line “it’s hard to get up and train when you’re sleeping on silk sheets.” Hopkins, judging by the way he talks, thinks, and performs, is sleeping on a bed of nails as he prepares for Jones in Miami. Would you call it paranoia? Hopkins would.

    “There’s no magic rabbit’s foot that I have,” he said of his success after 40. “If it was something legal that I was drinking, if it was something that I was cooking, or watching, looking at or reading, I would actually sell that on EBay. I would reel in millions of dollars hopefully with a good agent behind it. It’s that mentality. Whenever somebody might want to say that Bernard is paranoid – I am. I’m a hundred percent paranoid. But even being paranoid, you must have – at least if you’re smart – control enough where you don't become overly paranoid. There is a difference. Paranoid is the definition of awareness. But when you become too much of anything, it’s called an overdose. You can have an overdose of sex if you’re Tiger Woods. You can have an overdose of an interview if you’re interviewing me.”

    Never.

    But there is more to come from this story…

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    Re: Bernard Hopkins – The Executioner in Winter: Part 1 by Thomas Gerbasi

    Bernard Hopkins
    (the "Executioner")

    BORN January 15 1965; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
    HEIGHT 6-1
    WEIGHT 156-177 lbs
    MANAGER Bernard Hopkins
    TRAINER Bouie Fisher, Noazim Richardson


    Hopkins was one of the best middleweight fighters of recent years; His performance in the ring was as good as any middleweight ever; He was a patient, calculating, stiff punching fighter who was quick, clever and very capable; In addition, he was never knocked out during his career

    Bernard lost the very first professional fight of his career in 1988; He lost for the second time in 1993 (to Roy Jones Jr.) and did not lose again until 2005; Some observers have questioned the quality of his opposition but whenever he entered the ring, he performed well

    Hopkins' most impressive wins came against Felix Trinidad, Oscar De La Hoya, Glen Johnson, Antonio Tarver, John David Jackson, Simon Brown, William Joppy, Keith Holmes and Howard Eastman; As champion, he defended the title successfully 20 times

    Bernard is destined to be inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame when he becomes eligible

    1988
    Oct 11 Clinton Mitchell Atlantic City, NJ L 4

    1990
    Feb 22 Greg Paige Philadelphia, Pa W 4
    Apr 26 Keith Gray Philadelphia, Pa TK 1
    May 18 Eddie Tyler Atlantic City, NJ TK 1
    May 31 Jouvin Mercado Rochester, NY TK 2
    Jun 30 Khalif Shabazz Atlantic City, NJ KO 1
    Aug 5 Percy Harris Atlantic City, NJ W 6
    Oct 20 Darrin Oliver Atlantic City, NJ TK 1
    Nov 17 Mike Sapp Fort Myers, Fl TK 1

    1991
    Feb 26 Richard Quiles Philadelphia, Pa KO 1
    Mar 18 Steve Langley Las Vegas, Nv TK 3
    Jun 20 Pedro Marquez Parsippany, NJ TK 1
    Jul 9 Danny Mitchell Philadelphia, Pa KO 1
    Sep 23 Ralph Moncrief Philadelphia, Pa TK 1
    Nov 26 David McCluskey Philadelphia, Pa TK 7
    Dec 13 Willie Kemp Atlantic City, NJ W 10

    1992
    Jan 31 Dennis Milton Philadelphia, Pa TK 4
    Apr 3 Randy Smith Atlantic City, NJ W 10
    May 21 Anibal Miranda Paris, France W 10
    Aug 28 James Stokes Atlantic City, NJ KO 1
    Sep 14 Eric Rhinehart Philadelphia, Pa KO 1
    Dec 4 Wayne Powell Atlantic City, NJ TK 1
    -USBA Middleweight Championship

    1993
    Feb 16 Gilbert Baptist Denver, Co W 12
    -USBA Middleweight Championship
    May 22 Roy Jones Jr Washington, DC L 12
    -IBF Middleweight Championship of the World
    Aug 3 Roy Ritchie Las Vegas, Nv TK 7
    -USBA Middleweight Championship
    Nov 23 Wendall Hall Philadelphia, Pa TK 3
    -USBA Middleweight Championship

    1994
    Feb 26 Melvin Wynn Atlantic City, NJ TK 3
    May 17 Lupe Aquino Atlantic City, NJ W 12
    -USBA Middleweight Championship
    Dec 17 Segundo Mercado Quito, Ecuador D 12
    -IBF Middleweight Championship of the World

    1995
    Apr 29 Segundo Mercado Landover, Md TK 7
    -IBF Middleweight Championship of the World

    1996
    Jan 27 Steve Frank Phoenix, Az TK 1
    -IBF Middleweight Championship of the World
    Mar 16 Joe Lipsey Las Vegas, Nv KO 4
    -IBF Middleweight Championship of the World
    Jul 16 William Bo James Atlantic City, NJ TK 11
    -IBF Middleweight Championship of the World

    1997
    Apr 19 John David Jackson Shreveport, La TK 7
    -IBF Middleweight Championship of the World
    Jul 20 Glen Johnson Indio, Ca TK 11
    -IBF Middleweight Championship of the World
    Nov 18 Andrew Council Upper Marlboro, Md W 12
    -IBF Middleweight Championship of the World

    1998
    Jan 31 Simon Brown Atlantic City, NJ TK 6
    -IBF Middleweight Championship of the World
    Aug 28 Robert Allen Las Vegas, Nv NC 4
    -IBF Middleweight Championship of the World

    1999
    Feb 6 Robert Allen Washington, DC TK 7
    -IBF Middleweight Championship of the World
    Dec 12 Antwun Echols Miami, Fl W 12
    -IBF Middleweight Championship of the World

    2000
    May 13 Syd Vanderpool Indianapolis, In W 12
    -IBF Middleweight Championship of the World
    Dec 1 Antwun Echols Las Vegas, Nv TK 10
    -IBF Middleweight Championship of the World

    2001
    Apr 14 Keith Holmes New York, NY W 12
    -WBC Middleweight Championship of the World;
    IBF Middleweight Championship of the World
    Sep 29 Felix Trinidad New York, NY TK 12
    -WBC Middleweight Championship of the World;
    WBA Middleweight Championship of the World;
    IBF Middleweight Championship of the World

    2002
    Feb 2 Carl Daniels Reading, Pa TK 10
    -WBC Middleweight Championship of the World;
    WBA Middleweight Championship of the World;
    IBF Middleweight Championship of the World

    2003
    Mar 29 Morrade Hakkar Philadelphia, Pa TK 8
    -WBC Middleweight Championship of the World;
    WBA Middleweight Championship of the World;
    IBF Middleweight Championship of the World
    Dec 13 William Joppy Atlantic City, NJ W 12
    -WBC Middleweight Championship of the World;
    WBA Middleweight Championship of the World;
    IBF Middleweight Championship of the World

    2004
    Jun 5 Robert Allen Las Vegas, Nv W 12
    -WBC Middleweight Championship of the World;
    WBA Middleweight Championship of the World;
    IBF Middleweight Championship of the World
    Sep 18 Oscar De La Hoya Las Vegas, Nv KO 9
    -WBC Middleweight Championship of the World;
    WBA Middleweight Championship of the World;
    IBF Middleweight Championship of the World;
    WBO Middleweight Championship of the World

    2005
    Feb 19 Howard Eastman Los Angeles, Ca W 12
    -WBC Middleweight Championship of the World;
    WBA Middleweight Championship of the World;
    IBF Middleweight Championship of the World;
    WBO Middleweight Championship of the World
    Jul 16 Jermain Taylor Las Vegas, Nv L 12
    -WBC Middleweight Championship of the World;
    WBA Middleweight Championship of the World;
    IBF Middleweight Championship of the World;
    WBO Middleweight Championship of the World
    Dec 3 Jermain Taylor Las Vegas, Nv L 12
    -WBC Middleweight Championship of the World;
    WBA Middleweight Championship of the World;
    WBO Middleweight Championship of the World

    2006
    Jun 10 Antonio Tarver Atlantic City, NJ W 12
    -IBO Light Heavyweight Championship of the World

    2007
    Jul 21 Ronald "Winky" Wright Las Vegas, Nv W 12
    2008
    Apr 19 Joe Calzaghe Las Vegas, Nv L 12
    Oct 18 Kelly Pavlik Atlantic City, NJ W 12

    2009
    Dec 2 Enrique Ornelas Philadelphia, Pa W 12


    Record courtesy of Tracy Callis, Historian, International Boxing Research Organization

  28. #88
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    Re: Jones-Hopkins: The Worst Side of Boxing by Dr. Margaret Goodman

    I was just perusing my local cable PPV events and noticed this fight was offered for $9.99 + fees and taxes....

    Kind of reminds me of the "cutout" bin in my local record store back in the day, a fitting analogy me thinks.....

  29. #89
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    Alton Merkerson: “It’s That Split Second That Makes a Difference in Boxing”

    Alton Merkerson: “It’s That Split Second That Makes a Difference in Boxing”

    by Jerry Glick from Seconds Out

    When Bernard Hopkins faces Roy Jones Jr. they will be fighting the clock as well as each other. To the media there are two issues at work for this fight and in boxing in general. Age and drug testing have become the most popular topics among boxing media. Both came up during a conference call involving the trainers of these two greats.

    With the rematch between 41 year old Jones and 45 year old Hopkins that took seventeen years to happen now only two and a half weeks away it was the trainers turn to face the tough questions of the media. Naazim Richardson, who trains Hopkins, and Alton Merkerson, Jones’ trainer, answered questions and gave their insight about where the two future Hall of Fame fighters are at this stage in their careers. They did this during a non-contentious teleconference call on Wednesday.

    It was back in 1993 when Jones, 54-6 (40 KOs), outboxed Hopkins, 50-5-1 (32) -1 N/C, to take unanimous decision for the vacant IBF middleweight title.

    The show is co-promoted by Square Ring (Jones) and Golden Boy (Hopkins) and scheduled for April 3rd, at Mandalay Bay Casino and Resort in Las Vegas, Nevada.

    DRUG TESTING

    Both trainers are very aware of the recent allegations about “juicing” between Mayweather and Pacquiao, as well as the old saw on Mosley that dates back to 1992 and Balco.

    Merkerson talked about Jones’ loss to Danny Green.

    “We have an appeal and we’re trying to get the fight turned around,” began Jones’ long time coach. “Every championship fight, and I’ve worked over a hundred of them, you have to take a urinalysis test after or before the bout. Everybody should be required to have it after the fight because if you get it before the fight you can do anything after you take the urinalysis test.”

    He said that there was no test given to either fighter in Australia when Green knocked Jones out in a round and he cannot understand why the IBO didn’t demand it. He even asked the commissioner when there will be a urine test but was told that there would not be one.

    Everyone in boxing knows Naazim Richardson’s history. It was he who found loaded gloves on Tito Trinidad before he was to fight Hopkins in 2001, and more recently, it was Richardson who discovered illegal enhancement on Antonio Margarito’s tape as well before a fight with Shane Mosley. Both Hopkins and Mosley won by knockouts in those fights.

    “We have to be a watch-hound and make sure that the commissioners do what they are there to do,” said man known as Brother Naazim. “We have all been around each other so much we start taking things for granted.”

    Richardson added that it is important for everyone to do their job and keep the sport clean.

    There is so much drama behind this fight that it actually becomes more than just a fight. It is a question of health, age, and now drug testing has become such a huge topic in boxing that it is one of the most asked questions of these participants in spite of the fact that neither side is accusing the other of cheating. Yet it is still an issue.

    LONGEVITY

    Both of these men are fighting at a stage in life when other fighters are looking for other ways to be a part of boxing such as training, or promoting, but not fighting. But these two are so talented that they are trying to survive on skill alone. Between the two it is Hopkins who appears to be the better preserved. He is the older one, but time has treated him better.

    In recent years Jones has suffered losses that just never happened to him when he was rated as the number one pound for pound fighter during much of the nineties. After a career defining ascent to the heavyweight title with a win over John Ruiz his career went into decline. He attempted to regain his form as light-heavyweight champion, but after winning a squeaker over Antonio Tarver, he was crushed by him in a rematch. That is the same Tarver who was completely outfought by Hopkins later on. Roy then suffered another brutal KO loss to Glenn Johnson, and more recently the loss to Green.

    RICHARDSON

    “Bernard took care of his body when he was a young man,” explained Richardson. “He lived right. He never was one to party. Not a lot of unnecessary activities on his knees and his legs. He put himself in a position for his body to reward him later on in his years.”
    Naazim added that some fighters are not just fighters.

    “I’m starting to see it a lot,” he said. “You have guys who are actual athletes. Some are football players, baseball players, basketball players, they just happen to box, and bring that attribute to boxing. That’s fine until you get older then you can’t rely on those attributes.”

    He said that if you only relied on your given physicality you won’t last unless you also learned your sport, “Hopkins learned his sport,” according to Richardson.

    “Bernard is not a football player, Bernard is not a basketball player, Bernard is a fighter and he’s one of the few out there actually. Because he learned the craft of boxing he’s able to do it a lot longer than a lot of these other guys who relied too much on their athleticism.”

    There may be some history behind what Richardson says. I am hard pressed to recall too many physical, that is to say, aggressive fighters who fought successfully at an advanced age. While it is not a hard and fast rule, the most prominent older champions were mostly what I call finesse fighters. Skilled boxers such as Larry Holmes, Max Schmeling, Sugar Ray Robinson, Harold Johnson, and Archie Moore, among others, fought well into their forties. If you point at George Foreman and think that this old puncher lasted into his 40’s you are right but he re-invented himself into a fine, skilled boxer for his second career. Most brawlers faded faster than boxers; but what about the highly skilled Roy Jones? It is this writer’s opinion that it is no coincidence that he faded badly after attempting to lose muscle after fighting as a heavyweight and now, at 41 he is still paying that price.

    MERKERSON

    “For the time that Roy has been fighting, Roy’s 42 now, he’s been fighting for 32 years,” said Merkerson. “Roy has gotten hit more in the last four years of his boxing career than he ever did in his whole boxing career, and the reason being, things happen when you get older. Reflexes, timing slows down; you can’t do the things that you did before. He hasn’t lost those things, but it’s that split second that makes a difference in boxing.”

    PUNCHLINES

    Merkerson claimed that each time Roy was knocked out in recent years he just got caught and that he was ahead on the scorecards. With all due respect the Merkerson, that is inaccurate. Roy was stopped in two rounds by Tarver, one round by Green, and the only knockout defeat that went rounds was his ninth round loss to Johnson. All three judges had Johnson leading after eight rounds by scores of 78-74, and 77-75 twice.

  30. #90
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    Re: Bernard Hopkins – The Executioner in Winter: Part 1 by Thomas Gerbasi

    "Add in that he achieved all these things while fighting a system designed to keep him quiet and under control"


    I don't understand this statement. Since Ali, has a boxer ever been quiet? The squeeky wheel gets the press.

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