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Thread: Frankie & Tony Baltazar

  1. #481
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    Re: Frankie & Tony Baltazar

    Quote Originally Posted by Wing master View Post
    Thats really amazing to sellout weekley events that big. In the time I have been researching my uncles career it seems that the Olympic was as important to boxing as Madison Square Garden. And the Legion was very close behind them.
    I have always thought that if I had a time machine I would go back to 1935 and hang around these two places. I can't imagine the energy there on fight night.

    Randy
    Randy, on the nights when Art Aragon or Enrique Bolanos or comparable stars of the '50's fought, the electricity was so thick you could almost cut it with a knife....

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    Re: Frankie & Tony Baltazar

    The Golden age of Boxing. I really envy you guys that were there. I am a little disgusted sometimes when I see fighters today that come to a fight out of shape (Chris Areola) and not prepared. I bet some of you guys that saw some true champions and just the average fighter in perfect condition to fight 15 rounds are even more discouraged.
    I would like to see that kind of interest in boxing. I don't reckon I will.

    Randy

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    Re: Frankie & Tony Baltazar

    Man sitting at home on the veranda with his wife and he says, "I love you."


    She asks, "Is that you or the beer talking?"


    He replies, "It's me............. talking to the beer."

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    Re: Frankie & Tony Baltazar


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    Re: Frankie & Tony Baltazar



    (L-to-R) Tony Baltazar, my dad, Aurelio Baltazar and me
    Circa 1970

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    Re: Frankie & Tony Baltazar

    Tony Baltazar (middle top row) and his 6th grade flag football team, Tony was the QB.


    Circa 1968

    Tony and his raggedy tags team won the league championship 3 years in a row.

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    Re: Frankie & Tony Baltazar



    Tony Baltazar vs Rodney Moore

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    Re: Frankie & Tony Baltazar

    Quote Originally Posted by kikibalt View Post
    Man sitting at home on the veranda with his wife and he says, "I love you."


    She asks, "Is that you or the beer talking?"


    He replies, "It's me............. talking to the beer."
    Love it

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    Re: Frankie & Tony Baltazar

    "El Sobaco"

    Circa 1964 my friend Joe (not real name), who used to run a boxing gym in downtown L.A., and I were coming back from the Chino State Prison after attending some fights, as I was driving back to L.A. Joe asked me: “you want to go dancing?”, “I don’t know Joe, what do you have in mind?”, “I have a lady waiting for me at the International Ballroom”. The International Ballroom which was on First Street west of Soto was known as "El Sobaco” (The Underarm) because it stank, I don’t think the people that used to go dancing there believed in deodorant. ”I don’t know Joe, that place is for old people and I am told it stinks in there”, at the time I was 27 years old, Joe was in his mid-60’s. It was a place that drew people over 50 years old; so I was not comfortable going there, but Joe wanted to go and since we were in my car I said okay. We got there and walked up stair where the ballroom was at. First thing I did was get a close look at the band that was playing, the guys on the band looked so old that they must have started playing back in ’09, I then got a good look at the people, the youngest looked like they were in their mid-50’s. Joe spotted his friend sitting at a table with other people: “c’mon let go to their table”, Joe introduced me to his friend Rosie (not real name) and the rest of the people. As Joe was taking Rosie out to dance he said to me: “find somebody to dance with”, I looked around at the old people and said “I’ll be at the bar”. I sat at the bar and after drinking a couple of beers I felt like dancing. I looked for the youngest looking lady to ask to dance, I spotted one, she looked to be in her mid-50’s, I walked up to her and asked: “would you like to dance?”, she looked me up and down: “No, I don’t dance with just anybody, beside you’re too young”, “Oh!”, first time I was turned down for been too young!, went back to the bar and nurse a beer until closing time. Back in the car Joe asked me: “how come you didn’t dance?”, “I am too young”, “what?”, “oh never mind!”
    Last edited by kikibalt; 04-20-2011 at 08:36 PM.

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    Re: Frankie & Tony Baltazar

    When Losing is Winning: Tony Baltazar vs. Howard Davis, Jr.

    By Phil Rice: The mid-1980s represent something of a golden age for televised boxing. ESPN and USA had weekly boxing shows that often included all of the preliminary matches as well as the main events, so fans got a chance to see the up-and-coming fighters alongside the hard-working club-fighters who might not ever get beyond four-round status. HBO and Showtime programs featured big name attractions, and if a fan watched the cable listings closely, other boxing shows could be found on more obscure channels. But cable television was new and, though the technology was spreading at an enormous rate, as late as 1984 the majority of homes in the United States still picked up their television signal via antennae, which meant their viewing options consisted of ABC, NBC, CBS, and sometimes PBS.

    The good news for the boxing fans without cable was that some of the sports' biggest match-ups were still shown live on network telecasts for free, though the viewer was usually forced to wait through various competitions, such as figure skating or skeet shooting, to get to the boxing match. And this is why Sunday, February 22, 1983 found me sitting in front of the television with CBS Sports Sunday on the screen. The telecast featured an indoor track meet, which was not something that would have normally appealed to my tastes but I was willing to keep the show on in anticipation of the intriguing boxing match being offered afterwards. Howard Davis, Jr. was set to box Tony Baltazar in a lightweight match-up.

    Davis was a well-known athlete even to the casual sports fan because he had won a gold medal in the 1976 Olympics and had received the Val Barker Award as the outstanding boxer at those games. Afterwards he was considered a star-in-the-making and accordingly signed a huge contract with CBS Sports, but unlike his teammates Ray Leonard, John Tate, Leo Randolph, and brothers Leon and Michael Spinks, as of 1983 Davis had yet to fulfill his promise by winning a professional world championship. Not that he hadn't tried. In 1980 he traveled to Scotland to wrest the WBC crown from Jim Watt, but Watt retained the title with a unanimous decision.

    Following his loss to Watt, Davis fought sporadically against good but carefully chosen opponents. With his record stalled at 21-1, he was now looking to drum up interest in a title shot against Ray Mancini, who had won the WBA title from Arturo Frias in an exciting one-round donnybrook. Mancini, a power puncher with a tough chin and enormous heart, was a popular champion and a television favorite, but most boxing insiders gave the slick boxing Davis a comfortable edge in the match-up. Conventional wisdom suggested that Mancini's only chance would be to land a knockout punch, and Davis's skills were considered more than up to the task of keeping him out of harm's way while he piled up the points with combinations from the outside.

    In the midst of the build-up to a possible Davis-Mancini battle steps Tony "The Tiger" Baltazar. According to the pre-fight commentary, the fundamental elements of a classic boxer versus puncher encounter were present: a highly skilled defensive master with quick feet and fast hands against a powerful and presumably plodding tough guy with a big punch. The fact that the flashy boxer had shown a questionable chin in previous fights added the necessary element of suspense to the match-up, but the odds still heavily favored the supremely-skilled boxing master over the rugged slugger.

    On paper Baltazar was an obvious choice as a tune-up for Davis because he brought many of the same weapons into the ring as Mancini—he was a tough power puncher with an excellent left hook who could be expected to last the distance in a losing effort. To again borrow the old boxing cliché, he only had a puncher's chance in the contest. At least that is what the boxing pundits suggested going into the bout. But, unbeknownst to most of the television viewers, "The Tiger" was much more than a rough brawler. The first clue came when commentator Gil Clancy mentioned that Baltazar "had a great amateur background. He was the National AAU champion . . . ."

    Once the bell for round one rang, the Olympic champion began to discover what patrons of the Olympic Auditorium in Los Angeles had known for years—that Tony Baltazar was a well-trained, fine-tuned fighting machine with good defensive skills. And, as advertised, he also had power to spare.

    My casual round-by-round summary of the fight:

    Rd 1: Baltazar wins the round by confidently coming after Davis and landing a few punches. Davis moves around but does little offensively, apparently content to use the opening round to size up his opponent.

    Baltazar's round, 5-4.

    Rd 2: Davis comes out more assertive, throwing combinations and trying to take control of the fight while keeping the action on the outside. Baltazar is aggressive but seems to be impatient and anxious.

    Davis's round, 5-4.

    Rd 3: Davis is moving, throwing double and triple jabs followed by a right hand, using the ring; Baltazar is throwing a good jab but it's obvious that he's no match for Davis on the outside. He lands a good hook towards the end of the round but not much else.

    Davis's round, 5-4.

    Rd 4: Baltazar does not seem frustrated by Davis's speed and movement. Davis stays in command for the first minute and a half of the round, but then Baltazar lands a combination that changes the tenor. Suddenly Davis is not moving as much and Baltazar is able to get inside more effectively. With fifteen seconds to go in the round, Baltazar lands a thudding left hook to the body that gets everybody's attention.

    Baltazar's round, 5-4.

    Rd 5: Baltazar comes out in the fifth and lands a tremendous hook that sends Davis sprawling on the canvas. He struggles to his feet on unsteady legs as the referee counts. Baltazar comes right after him, and Davis immediately shows his world class sprinting ability. At first Baltazar seems a little overanxious, then he calms down—but he calms down a little too much. Davis is able to move around the ring and by mid round his head seems clear and he is throwing combinations again. As the round winds down Baltazar shows his own boxing skills with a powerful jab followed by precise combinations.

    Baltazar's round, 5-3.

    Rd 6: The first half of the round is evenly contested with Baltazar continuing to come forward and Davis skillfully moving. In the final minute of the round Baltazar slows down slightly and Davis flashes several combinations to gain an edge in scoring.

    Davis's round, 5-4.

    Rd 7: Another evenly contested round in the opening minute, but this time it's Baltazar who lands the more effective combinations to close the round. He bulls Davis in the corner on occasion and uses his superior strength on the inside.

    Balatzar's round, 5-4.

    Rd 8: Davis starts the round looking determined to take back control of the fight. He moves less and keeps his hands busy. Baltazar doesn't keep up the pace but he does land some solid punches to the body. In the final minute a perfect left hook drops Davis on his seat.

    Baltazar's round, 5-3.

    Rd 9: Sensing the fight slip away, Davis comes out aggressively looking to trade, but Baltazar is ready for him. It's a spirited round with Davis taking a very slight edge thanks to his speed and quantity of punches.

    Davis's round, 5-4.

    Rd 10: Davis continues to be aggressive, and he again gains a very slight edge in an exciting round.

    Davis's round, 5-4.

    The fight is officially scored on the round system with a supplemental points system to be used in the event of a draw. Because I was, as a fan, pulling for Baltazar, my scoring gives Davis the benefit of the doubt on the close rounds to offset my favoritism. My scorecard shows the fight even at 5 rounds apiece. Using the supplemental scoring system, Baltazar wins 45-43, thanks to the two knockdowns. But the official scorecards were 7-3, 8-2, and 5-4-1 for Davis, thus rendering the supplemental scoring system moot. The Olympic champion is still on course for a title shot.

    Baltazar shakes his head when he hears the lopsided scoring as if he senses what is about to happen. When the final verdict in favor of Davis is announced he looks over at Frank Baltazar, his father and chief second, who flashes a cynical and resigned expression that seems to say "well son, we knew you'd have to knock him out to get the win."

    Despite being on the victorious end of a highly debatable verdict (most observers felt Baltazar earned the victory), Howard Davis, Jr. proved that he was not only a brilliant boxer but that he possessed a champion's heart. He received more than he bargained for in his opponent this day—Baltazar was clearly a more complete fighter than Mancini—and he had weathered the storm admirably. He had also showed a willingness to get into the trenches and trade punches if necessary, though that was certainly not his preference.

    His flawed performance made a fight with Mancini even more intriguing, but it never happened. When he did get another title shot it was against Edwin Rosario for the WBC title. Rosario was a skillful boxer-puncher with good power, and he was at the peak of what would prove to be his athletic prime. Davis lost a split decision, with two knockdowns—both from left hooks—making the difference in the scoring. He retired in 1996 with his goal of becoming a World Champion in the pro ranks unfulfilled, but his legacy of being one of the finest amateur boxers ever to lace up the gloves remains untarnished.

    Stepping in against Howard Davis marked the big-time debut for Tony Baltazar, and his outstanding performance instantly elevated him to genuine contender status. As he would further demonstrate in subsequent fights, Baltazar possessed a professional demeanor, a sturdy chin, a tremendous heart, great power, and one of the best left hooks in the sport. Just five months after the Davis fight he was in the ring with Robin Blake, a tall power puncher who was receiving tons of media exposure. Baltazar and Blake traded bombs back and forth in one of the most exciting fights of the year. Once again Baltazar raised his stock in a losing effort, this time by ninth round technical knockout.

    Unfortunately, like Davis, Baltazar never brought home a world title, but his resume is littered with victories over world-class opponents, most notably a decision victory over Roger Mayweather in 1984. Regardless of such baubles, "Tony the Tiger" proved that he was one of the best lightweights of his generation. Howard Davis, one must assume, would agree with that assessment.

    More so than probably any other sport, assessing a boxer's career by looking at the final tally of wins and losses barely provides even a clue as to the athlete's true worth. Perhaps that's a point for the rest of us—that simple two dimensional analyses are ultimately superficial and deceptive. On February 22, 1983, Howard Davis, Jr. was awarded a victory, and from that day forward Tony Baltazar carried an "L10" on his record. But the story is much deeper and richer than those simple facts illustrate. The story is one of growth and fortitude, of living and breathing. And so it is that a single boxing match in the career of two legendary pugilists can stand as a definitive moment for each, regardless of whose hand was raised after the final bell.


    Phil Rice, a native of Tennessee, currently lives and writes in Pittsburgh, Pa. He may be contacted at phil@canopicpublishing.com.

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    Re: Frankie & Tony Baltazar

    Quote Originally Posted by kikibalt View Post
    When Losing is Winning: Tony Baltazar vs. Howard Davis, Jr.

    By Phil Rice: The mid-1980s represent something of a golden age for televised boxing. ESPN and USA had weekly boxing shows that often included all of the preliminary matches as well as the main events, so fans got a chance to see the up-and-coming fighters alongside the hard-working club-fighters who might not ever get beyond four-round status. HBO and Showtime programs featured big name attractions, and if a fan watched the cable listings closely, other boxing shows could be found on more obscure channels. But cable television was new and, though the technology was spreading at an enormous rate, as late as 1984 the majority of homes in the United States still picked up their television signal via antennae, which meant their viewing options consisted of ABC, NBC, CBS, and sometimes PBS.

    The good news for the boxing fans without cable was that some of the sports' biggest match-ups were still shown live on network telecasts for free, though the viewer was usually forced to wait through various competitions, such as figure skating or skeet shooting, to get to the boxing match. And this is why Sunday, February 22, 1983 found me sitting in front of the television with CBS Sports Sunday on the screen. The telecast featured an indoor track meet, which was not something that would have normally appealed to my tastes but I was willing to keep the show on in anticipation of the intriguing boxing match being offered afterwards. Howard Davis, Jr. was set to box Tony Baltazar in a lightweight match-up.

    Davis was a well-known athlete even to the casual sports fan because he had won a gold medal in the 1976 Olympics and had received the Val Barker Award as the outstanding boxer at those games. Afterwards he was considered a star-in-the-making and accordingly signed a huge contract with CBS Sports, but unlike his teammates Ray Leonard, John Tate, Leo Randolph, and brothers Leon and Michael Spinks, as of 1983 Davis had yet to fulfill his promise by winning a professional world championship. Not that he hadn't tried. In 1980 he traveled to Scotland to wrest the WBC crown from Jim Watt, but Watt retained the title with a unanimous decision.

    Following his loss to Watt, Davis fought sporadically against good but carefully chosen opponents. With his record stalled at 21-1, he was now looking to drum up interest in a title shot against Ray Mancini, who had won the WBA title from Arturo Frias in an exciting one-round donnybrook. Mancini, a power puncher with a tough chin and enormous heart, was a popular champion and a television favorite, but most boxing insiders gave the slick boxing Davis a comfortable edge in the match-up. Conventional wisdom suggested that Mancini's only chance would be to land a knockout punch, and Davis's skills were considered more than up to the task of keeping him out of harm's way while he piled up the points with combinations from the outside.

    In the midst of the build-up to a possible Davis-Mancini battle steps Tony "The Tiger" Baltazar. According to the pre-fight commentary, the fundamental elements of a classic boxer versus puncher encounter were present: a highly skilled defensive master with quick feet and fast hands against a powerful and presumably plodding tough guy with a big punch. The fact that the flashy boxer had shown a questionable chin in previous fights added the necessary element of suspense to the match-up, but the odds still heavily favored the supremely-skilled boxing master over the rugged slugger.

    On paper Baltazar was an obvious choice as a tune-up for Davis because he brought many of the same weapons into the ring as Mancini—he was a tough power puncher with an excellent left hook who could be expected to last the distance in a losing effort. To again borrow the old boxing cliché, he only had a puncher's chance in the contest. At least that is what the boxing pundits suggested going into the bout. But, unbeknownst to most of the television viewers, "The Tiger" was much more than a rough brawler. The first clue came when commentator Gil Clancy mentioned that Baltazar "had a great amateur background. He was the National AAU champion . . . ."

    Once the bell for round one rang, the Olympic champion began to discover what patrons of the Olympic Auditorium in Los Angeles had known for years—that Tony Baltazar was a well-trained, fine-tuned fighting machine with good defensive skills. And, as advertised, he also had power to spare.

    My casual round-by-round summary of the fight:

    Rd 1: Baltazar wins the round by confidently coming after Davis and landing a few punches. Davis moves around but does little offensively, apparently content to use the opening round to size up his opponent.

    Baltazar's round, 5-4.

    Rd 2: Davis comes out more assertive, throwing combinations and trying to take control of the fight while keeping the action on the outside. Baltazar is aggressive but seems to be impatient and anxious.

    Davis's round, 5-4.

    Rd 3: Davis is moving, throwing double and triple jabs followed by a right hand, using the ring; Baltazar is throwing a good jab but it's obvious that he's no match for Davis on the outside. He lands a good hook towards the end of the round but not much else.

    Davis's round, 5-4.

    Rd 4: Baltazar does not seem frustrated by Davis's speed and movement. Davis stays in command for the first minute and a half of the round, but then Baltazar lands a combination that changes the tenor. Suddenly Davis is not moving as much and Baltazar is able to get inside more effectively. With fifteen seconds to go in the round, Baltazar lands a thudding left hook to the body that gets everybody's attention.

    Baltazar's round, 5-4.

    Rd 5: Baltazar comes out in the fifth and lands a tremendous hook that sends Davis sprawling on the canvas. He struggles to his feet on unsteady legs as the referee counts. Baltazar comes right after him, and Davis immediately shows his world class sprinting ability. At first Baltazar seems a little overanxious, then he calms down—but he calms down a little too much. Davis is able to move around the ring and by mid round his head seems clear and he is throwing combinations again. As the round winds down Baltazar shows his own boxing skills with a powerful jab followed by precise combinations.

    Baltazar's round, 5-3.

    Rd 6: The first half of the round is evenly contested with Baltazar continuing to come forward and Davis skillfully moving. In the final minute of the round Baltazar slows down slightly and Davis flashes several combinations to gain an edge in scoring.

    Davis's round, 5-4.

    Rd 7: Another evenly contested round in the opening minute, but this time it's Baltazar who lands the more effective combinations to close the round. He bulls Davis in the corner on occasion and uses his superior strength on the inside.

    Balatzar's round, 5-4.

    Rd 8: Davis starts the round looking determined to take back control of the fight. He moves less and keeps his hands busy. Baltazar doesn't keep up the pace but he does land some solid punches to the body. In the final minute a perfect left hook drops Davis on his seat.

    Baltazar's round, 5-3.

    Rd 9: Sensing the fight slip away, Davis comes out aggressively looking to trade, but Baltazar is ready for him. It's a spirited round with Davis taking a very slight edge thanks to his speed and quantity of punches.

    Davis's round, 5-4.

    Rd 10: Davis continues to be aggressive, and he again gains a very slight edge in an exciting round.

    Davis's round, 5-4.

    The fight is officially scored on the round system with a supplemental points system to be used in the event of a draw. Because I was, as a fan, pulling for Baltazar, my scoring gives Davis the benefit of the doubt on the close rounds to offset my favoritism. My scorecard shows the fight even at 5 rounds apiece. Using the supplemental scoring system, Baltazar wins 45-43, thanks to the two knockdowns. But the official scorecards were 7-3, 8-2, and 5-4-1 for Davis, thus rendering the supplemental scoring system moot. The Olympic champion is still on course for a title shot.

    Baltazar shakes his head when he hears the lopsided scoring as if he senses what is about to happen. When the final verdict in favor of Davis is announced he looks over at Frank Baltazar, his father and chief second, who flashes a cynical and resigned expression that seems to say "well son, we knew you'd have to knock him out to get the win."

    Despite being on the victorious end of a highly debatable verdict (most observers felt Baltazar earned the victory), Howard Davis, Jr. proved that he was not only a brilliant boxer but that he possessed a champion's heart. He received more than he bargained for in his opponent this day—Baltazar was clearly a more complete fighter than Mancini—and he had weathered the storm admirably. He had also showed a willingness to get into the trenches and trade punches if necessary, though that was certainly not his preference.

    His flawed performance made a fight with Mancini even more intriguing, but it never happened. When he did get another title shot it was against Edwin Rosario for the WBC title. Rosario was a skillful boxer-puncher with good power, and he was at the peak of what would prove to be his athletic prime. Davis lost a split decision, with two knockdowns—both from left hooks—making the difference in the scoring. He retired in 1996 with his goal of becoming a World Champion in the pro ranks unfulfilled, but his legacy of being one of the finest amateur boxers ever to lace up the gloves remains untarnished.

    Stepping in against Howard Davis marked the big-time debut for Tony Baltazar, and his outstanding performance instantly elevated him to genuine contender status. As he would further demonstrate in subsequent fights, Baltazar possessed a professional demeanor, a sturdy chin, a tremendous heart, great power, and one of the best left hooks in the sport. Just five months after the Davis fight he was in the ring with Robin Blake, a tall power puncher who was receiving tons of media exposure. Baltazar and Blake traded bombs back and forth in one of the most exciting fights of the year. Once again Baltazar raised his stock in a losing effort, this time by ninth round technical knockout.

    Unfortunately, like Davis, Baltazar never brought home a world title, but his resume is littered with victories over world-class opponents, most notably a decision victory over Roger Mayweather in 1984. Regardless of such baubles, "Tony the Tiger" proved that he was one of the best lightweights of his generation. Howard Davis, one must assume, would agree with that assessment.

    More so than probably any other sport, assessing a boxer's career by looking at the final tally of wins and losses barely provides even a clue as to the athlete's true worth. Perhaps that's a point for the rest of us—that simple two dimensional analyses are ultimately superficial and deceptive. On February 22, 1983, Howard Davis, Jr. was awarded a victory, and from that day forward Tony Baltazar carried an "L10" on his record. But the story is much deeper and richer than those simple facts illustrate. The story is one of growth and fortitude, of living and breathing. And so it is that a single boxing match in the career of two legendary pugilists can stand as a definitive moment for each, regardless of whose hand was raised after the final bell.


    Phil Rice, a native of Tennessee, currently lives and writes in Pittsburgh, Pa. He may be contacted at phil@canopicpublishing.com.
    http://www.canopicpublishing.com/theporch/baltazar.htm

    Article with photos

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    Re: Frankie & Tony Baltazar

    Don't know if I have already posted this



    Tony and me...circa 1980

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    Re: Frankie & Tony Baltazar



    There is now a Manuel's "El Tepeyac" in City of Industry. Gonna has to try it soon.

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    Re: Frankie & Tony Baltazar

    frank,

    don't eat that without being in the presence of a para medic !!!!

    greg

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    Re: Frankie & Tony Baltazar

    Quote Originally Posted by gregbeyer View Post
    frank,

    don't eat that without being in the presence of a para medic !!!!

    greg
    Not to worry Greg, no way, no how, can I eat that much!!....LOL!!

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    Re: Frankie & Tony Baltazar



    Richard Savala & Frankie Baltazar

    California Boxing Hall Of Fame...6-25-2011

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    Re: Frankie & Tony Baltazar



    Don Fraser & Frank Baltazar

    California Boxing Hall Of Fame...6-25-2011

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    Re: Frankie & Tony Baltazar

    The Ring Magazine's Annual Ratings: 1978

    As selected by The Ring magazine in the March 1979 issue.

    Heavyweights

    Muhammad Ali, Champion

    1. Larry Holmes
    2. Ken Norton
    3. Leon Spinks
    4. Ron Lyle
    5. Jimmy Young
    6. Kallie Knoetze
    7. Alfredo Evangelista
    8. Gerrie Coetzee
    9. Ossie Ocasio
    10. Domingo D'Elia

    Light Heavyweights

    Title Vacant

    1. Mike Rossman
    2. Matthew Franklin
    3. John Conteh
    4. Yaqui Lopez
    5. Marvin Johnson
    6. Mate Parlov
    7. Victor Emilio Galindez
    8. James Scott
    9. Vonzell Johnson
    10. Bobby Cassidy

    Middleweights

    Hugo Pastor Corro, Champion

    1. Marvin Hagler
    2. Vito Antuofermo
    3. Ronnie Harris
    4. Marcos Geraldo
    5. Mike Colbert
    6. Bennie Briscoe
    7. Rudy Robles
    8. Tony Chiaverini
    9. Elijah Makathini
    10. Bobby Watts

    Junior Middleweights

    Masashi Kudo, Champion

    1. Ayub Kalule
    2. Rocky Mattioli
    3. Maurice Hope
    4. Rocky Mosley Jr.
    5. Edgar Ross
    6. Frank Wissenbach
    7. Alvin Anderson
    8. Loucif Hamani
    9. Marijan Benes
    10. Mustafa Hamsho

    Welterweights

    Carlos Palomino, Champion

    1. Pipino Cuevas
    2. Clyde Gray
    3. Sugar Ray Leonard
    4. Johnny Gant
    5. Harold Weston
    6. Pete Ranzany
    7. Randy Shields
    8. Davey (Boy) Green
    9. Thomas Hearns
    10. Andy Price

    Junior Welterweights

    Wilfred Benitez, Champion

    1. Antonio Cervantes
    2. Saensak Muangsurin
    3. Esteban De Jesus
    4. Miguel Montilla
    5. Saoul Mamby
    6. Domingo Ayala
    7. Nani Marrero
    8. Jo Kimpuani
    9. Adolfo Viruet
    10. Sean O'Grady

    Lightweights

    Roberto Duran, Champion

    1. Alfredo Pitalua
    2. Giancarlo Usai
    3. Vilomar Fernandez
    4. Claude Noel
    5. Jim Watt
    6. Johnny Lira
    7. Edwin Viruet
    8. Termite Watkins
    9. Julio Valdez
    10. Herman Montes


    Junior Lightweights

    Samuel Serrano, Champion

    1.Frankie Baltazar
    2. Alexis Arguello
    3. Rafael (Bazooka) Limon
    4. Alfredo Escalera
    5. Natale Vezzoli
    6. Bobby Chacon
    7. Arturo Leon
    8. Ernesto Espana
    9. Walter Seeley
    10. Greg Coverson

    Featherweights

    Title Vacant

    1. Danny Lopez
    2. Wilfredo Gomez
    3. Eusebio Pedroza
    4. Ricardo Cardona
    5. Roberto Castanon
    6. Ruben Castillo
    7. Cecilio Lastra
    8. Hector Carrasquilla
    9. Mike Ayala
    10. Juan Domingo Malvarez

    Bantamweights

    Jorge Lujan, Champion

    1. Lupe Pintor
    2. Carlos Zarate
    3. Franco Zurlo
    4. Alfonso Zamora
    5. Alberto Sandoval
    6. Frankie Duarte
    7. Richard Rozelle
    8. Roberto Rubaldino
    9. Alberto Davila
    10. Enrique Sanchez

    Flyweights

    Miguel Canto, Champion

    1. Yoko Gushiken
    2. Betulio Gonzalez
    3. Guty Espadas
    4. Franco Udella
    5. Sung Jun Kim
    6. Freddy Castillo
    7. Netrnoi Sor Vorasingh
    8. Jose Ortiz
    9. Charlie Magri
    10. Shoji Oguma

  19. #499
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    Re: Frankie & Tony Baltazar

    WOW Frank. That really takes me back. That was the year I had my debut. I only fought as an amature, but these guys were my idols. Every minute of my days, I lived Boxing. When I wasn't working out I was watching Boxing on television.
    If I could only go back I would have done a few things different.

    Thanks Frank
    Wing master

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    Re: Frankie & Tony Baltazar



    Tony at 3 1/5 taking a jab, or is that a hook? by a unknown opponent... :witzend:

  21. #501
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    Re: Frankie & Tony Baltazar

    Quote Originally Posted by Wing master View Post
    WOW Frank. That really takes me back. That was the year I had my debut. I only fought as an amature, but these guys were my idols. Every minute of my days, I lived Boxing. When I wasn't working out I was watching Boxing on television.
    If I could only go back I would have done a few things different.

    Thanks Frank
    Wing master
    Those were the days Randy, for some of us anyway....We all wish we would have done some things differently, don't we??

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    Re: Frankie & Tony Baltazar


    Eastside Boys Club

    Frankie with unknown opponent....Take a close look at the ref, recognize him?... :TU:

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    Re: Frankie & Tony Baltazar


    Stanton A.C.

    Tony (R) with unknown opponent

  24. #504
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    Re: Frankie & Tony Baltazar



    Frankie (R) with unknown opponent

  25. #505
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    Re: Frankie & Tony Baltazar



    Tony when he was 3 1/2...1964

  26. #506
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    Re: Frankie & Tony Baltazar

    I was awarded the Joe Louis Humanitarian Award three years ago.




  27. #507
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    Re: Frankie & Tony Baltazar

    As I was getting up early this morning I tripped over my laptop's cable and I felled head over heels and landed on my back, at the time Connie was in the shower and there was nobody else home but the dogs. Chata, our English Bulldog walked up to me as I'm laying on the floor, put her nose to mind and I can see she thinking "pendejo". By the time Connie got out of the shower I was sitting on the bed, I said, "babe I felled down", Connie: "pendejo"....I said "I thought you loved me", Connie : "I do, but I don't like you"...go fi

  28. #508
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    Re: Frankie & Tony Baltazar

    Has Connie been talking to my wife? That sounds like something she would say.

    Randy

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    Re: Frankie & Tony Baltazar



    Latest picture of Tony "The Tiger" Baltazar

  30. #510
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    Re: Frankie & Tony Baltazar

    Quote Originally Posted by Wing master View Post
    Has Connie been talking to my wife? That sounds like something she would say.

    Randy
    Maybe Randy, Connie has being talking to somebody lately, I'm sure of that because she hasn't been as nice to me lately....lol!!

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