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Thread: The 100th Anniversary of the First “Fight of the Century”

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    The 100th Anniversary of the First “Fight of the Century”

    The 100th Anniversary of the First “Fight of the Century”
    By Marty Mulcahey from Max Boxing

    Tomorrow marks the centennial anniversary of three colors - white, black, and green - converging violently to produce one of the most controversial and historic fights in boxing history. On Independence Day of 1910, former undefeated heavyweight champion James Jeffries was conscripted out of retirement by a Caucasian public to face down a prime Jack Johnson. It was an event which made a lot of money but produced real life consequences that ended in death. In the prefight build up, Jeffries, inactive for six years, gave a hint to the pressures heaped upon him. "I feel obligated to the sporting public at least to make an effort to reclaim the heavyweight championship for the white race.” Thankfully, boxing and society has evolved from the ignorance that spawned those words but the fight itself remains one of the most notorious of all-time.

    The impetus for the event began less than two years earlier, halfway around the globe in Australia, when Jack Johnson knocked out Tommy Burns to win the world heavyweight title. A fight that had to happen outside of American borders since the prevailing racism of the time would not allow a black man to fight for the most prestigious championship in sports. Make no mistake though, not everything revolved around race. Finances played a large role, with promoters certain they could not make as much money with a “Negro” champion. Johnson did not care about any promoter’s concerns or any other man’s, for that matter, and reveled in the role of antagonist to societal norms. The champion knew he was the best and had no problem conveying his confidence in or out of the ring. It was not a clever publicity strategy (a good argument is to be made that Johnson was 50 years ahead of his time) but Johnson was a proud man who would not be dictated to.



    Former heavyweight champion James Jeffries was the antithesis of Jack Johnson. A sporting gentleman who retired to a farm without a defeat on his ledger and was so respected that he chose the men who would fight for the title he vacated. A brawling menace inside the ropes, Jeffries had never been knocked down and drew favorable comparisons to the great John L. Sullivan. That image remained with the public but six years of retirement had turned Jeffries into a man of comfort. The 37-year-old man who entered the ring on that hot dessert afternoon shed 100 pounds to give the appearance of physical respectability. Unfortunately for Jeffries, the skills that made him great melted away with the pounds and the accumulation of age. In one sense, this was also one of boxing’s first comebacks. Frankly, a sad foretelling of what was to follow in the century to past-their-prime legends attempting to recapture greatness.

    The event was the first to be correctly labeled as "The Fight of the Century" and, in a negative sense, Jeffries morphed into the first “Great White Hope.” For weeks, newspapers in every city around the world published stories on every conceivable aspect or angle to the fight. Magazines sent their top correspondents or public personalities to a then-unremarkable Nevada town of Reno (after San Francisco was scratched, due to political pressure) to cover the fight, most notably, author Jack London (a great writer but virulent racist) former heavyweight champion John L. Sullivan, and Bat Masterson. They were joined by every other respected journalist of the day. Those who could not attend in person read hastily-typed bulletins posted outside of newspaper offices or gathered in auditoriums and trendy athletic clubs to read updates from specially-installed ticker tapes. Most absorbed financial blows betting on the fight, as odds swelled to an unrealistic 10-to-4 for Jeffries because fans were betting with their heart instead of head.

    Those lucky enough to attend in person, 20,000 fans packed a stadium specifically built for the occasion and purchased tickets from $10.00 to $50.00. Promoters Tex Rickard and Jack Gleason made $360,000 at the gate and another $200,000 from the new revenue stream of movie rights. The bout was so big that it brought about the first collaboration of companies to share and incorporate international film rights. Three of the leading movie companies combined efforts to create footage of the Jeffries-Johnson fight, paying $50,000 to each fighter for the privilege of filming what was basically one of the first feature-length documentaries. That became a financial disaster when the footage was banned in many parts of America because of riots outside of theaters that aired the film. A mere three days after the fight, a movement by the Christian lobby, police unions, and a proclamation by former president Teddy Roosevelt became the impetus to shelve the film. It was not until 1940 that the ban was lifted by congress, who forbade prizefight films from distributing it across state lines.

    The fight itself was anticlimactic, nothing short of an ugly mismatch. Johnson battered a helpless Jeffries, alternating between verbally ridiculing the champion and his supporters sitting ringside. It has often been aptly described as a cat toying with a mouse and, for 15 rounds, the dominant Johnson did as he wished with his outgunned rival. In the 15th round, Jeffries was knocked down twice for the first time in his career, after which his cornermen entered the ring expressly so that Jeffries would not be counted out. Seconds later, police jumped in to defuse any tension inside the ring. However, outside the ropes, the crowd seemed strangely ambivalent. The New York Daily Tribune remarked on those in attendance who just watched their idol dissected. “Thousands were silent, just readjusting things in their mind.” Other parts of the country were not so fortunate. Race riots broke out in several cities as news of Jeffries’ demise spread. At a minimum, 23 black Americans were murdered in the aftermath of the “Fight of the Century.” A hopeless attempt by whites to avenge Jeffries, who was described by The New York Times as “a broken idol”.

    The champion earned $175,000 for the fight (60% of the purse went to the winner), while his challenger reportedly pocketed $125,000 for his pasting. Both immense sums for the era. It is a figure James Jeffries would have gladly given back to erase the blight from his personal history. "I was too old to come back. I guess my pride got the better of my good judgment." Directly following the fight, Jack Johnson was less introspective, feasting on the racial misery of others under whose abuse he had suffered all his life. "I could have fought for two hours longer; it was easy. I wish it was longer; I was having lots of fun. I am unmarked. Not one blow hurt me." There was also a gracious and a gregarious side to Johnson that emerged. "He came back at me with the heart of a true fighter. No man can say he did not do his best. There was nothing said between us which was rough. He joked me and I joked him." Johnson even threw an old racial stereotype back at naysayers. "I told him I knew he was a bear but I was a gorilla and would defeat him."

    With victory, Johnson elevated himself even more as a target. It directly led to his European exile, while still champion, on trumped-up charges of violating the Mann Act (transporting a woman across state lines for immoral purposes). It was of little consequence that the woman was his third wife; the fact that the lady was white infuriated and broadened the hatred even more. Johnson’s indomitable persona and the racial loathing it fermented made it impossible for a black heavyweight to become champion until two decades had passed. It took Joe Louis’ undeniable skill and self-assuredness to play the role of humble warrior to convince the white power structure of his acceptability. Ironically, it was Joe Louis’ clash with perceived Nazi sympathizer Max Schmeling (the second “Fight of the Century”) which cast the new black heavyweight champion in the role that he and Jack Johnson deserved. That of a hero.

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    Re: The 100th Anniversary of the First “Fight of the Century”

    Jack Johnson
    (John Arthur Johnson)
    (the "Galveston Giant")

    BORN March 31 1878; Galveston, Texas
    DIED June 10 1946; Raleigh, North Carolina
    HEIGHT 6-0 1/4
    WEIGHT 185-221 lbs
    MANAGERS Morris Hart, Johnny Connors, Alec McLean, Sam Fitzpatrick, Abe Arends, George Little, Tom Flanagan, Sig Hart
    Johnson is rated as possibly the best heavyweight who ever fought; He was a master on defense and almost flawless in all other aspects of pugilism; He was fast, possessed an outstanding jab and uppercut, and was practically impossible to hit cleanly

    Nat Fleischer ranked Johnson as the #1 All-Time Heavyweight; Charley Rose ranked him as the #2 All-Time Heavyweight; Herb Goldman ranked him the #4 All-Time Heavyweight; Johnson was inducted into the Ring Boxing Hall of Fame in 1954 and the International Boxing Hall of Fame in 1990



    1894
    John Lee Galveston, Tx W 16
    -Some sources report "KO 15"
    Undated (circa 1894-95)
    Dave Pierson Galveston, Tx W

    1895
    Apr 11 "Utah" Bob Thompson Galveston, Tx L 4
    -Some sources report 1899

    1896
    Cherokee Kansas City, Ks KO
    Howard Pollar Galveston, Tx W

    1897
    Jim Rocks Galveston, Tx KO 4
    Sam Smith Galveston, Tx W 10

    1898
    Reddy Bremer Galveston, Tx KO 3
    Jim Cole Galveston, Tx W 4
    Henry Smith Galveston, Tx D 15

    1899
    Feb 11 Jim McCormick Galveston, Tx D 7
    Mar 17 Jim McCormick Galveston, Tx WF 7
    May 6 Klondike (John Haines) Chicago, Il LT 4
    Dec 16 Pat Smith Galveston, Tx D 12

    1900
    Mar 7 John Lee Galveston, Tx W 15
    Mar 20 Willie McNeal Galveston, Tx KO 15
    Apr 6 Bob White Galveston, Tx W 15
    Apr 12 Charley Brooks Galveston, Tx KO 2
    May 1 Jim Scanlan Galveston, Tx KO 7
    May 6 Jim McCormick Galveston, Tx KO 2
    May 28 Jim McCormick Galveston, Tx KO 7
    Jun 12 Horace Miles Galveston, Tx KO 3
    Jun 25 Klondike (John Haines) Galveston, Tx D 20
    -Some sources report 6/28/00
    Oct George Lawler Galveston, Tx KO 10
    Nov Josh Mills Memphis, Tn W 12
    Dec 27 Klondike (John Haines) Memphis, Tn TK 14
    -Some sources report 12/28/00

    1901
    Feb 25 Joe Choynski Galveston, Tx LK 3
    -Both fighters were arrested after the fight
    Mar 22 –Johnson and Choynski were released from jail
    after each posted a $1,000 bond
    Apr 26 Billy Stift Denver, Co D 10
    Nov 4 Hank Griffin Bakersfield, Ca L 20
    Dec 27 Hank Griffin Oakland, Ca D 15

    1902
    Feb 7 Dan Murphy Waterbury, Ct KO 10
    Feb 22 Ed Johnson Galveston, Tx KO 4
    Mar 7 Joe Kennedy Oakland, Ca KO 4
    Apr 6 Bob White in California W 15
    May 16 Jack Jeffries Los Angeles, Ca KO 5
    May 26 Klondike (John Haines) Memphis, Tn KO 13
    Jun 4 Billy Stift Chicago, Il D 10
    Jun 20 Hank Griffin Los Angeles, Ca D 20
    Jul 6 Hank Griffin in California D 20
    Sep 3 “Mexican” Pete Everett Victor, Co W 20
    Oct 21 Frank Childs Los Angeles, Ca TK 12
    Oct 31 George Gardner San Francisco, Ca W 20
    Dec 4 Fred Russell Los Angeles, Ca WF 8

    1903
    Feb 3 "Denver" Ed Martin Los Angeles, Ca W 20
    -Colored Heavyweight Championship of the World
    Feb 27 Sam McVea Los Angeles, Ca W 20
    -Colored Heavyweight Championship of the World
    Apr 16 John "Sandy" Ferguson Boston, Ma W 10
    May 11 Joe Butler Philadelphia, Pa KO 3
    Jul 31 John "Sandy" Ferguson Philadelphia, Pa ND 6
    Oct 27 Sam McVea Los Angeles, Ca W 20
    -Colored Heavyweight Championship of the World
    Dec 11 John "Sandy" Ferguson Colma, Ca W 20

    1904
    Feb 6 John "Sandy" Ferguson Philadelphia, Pa ND 6
    Feb 16 Black Bill (Claude Brooks) Philadelphia, Pa ND 6
    Apr 22 Sam McVea San Francisco, Ca KO 20
    Jun 2 Frank Childs Chicago, Il W 6
    Oct 18 "Denver" Ed Martin Los Angeles, Ca KO 2

    1905
    Mar 28 Marvin Hart San Francisco, Ca L 20
    Apr 25 Jim Jeffords Philadelphia, Pa KO 4
    May 3 Black Bill (Claude Brooks) Philadelphia, Pa KO 4
    May 9 Joe Jeannette Philadelphia, Pa ND 3
    May 9 Walter Johnson Philadelphia, Pa KO 3
    May 19 Joe Jeannette Philadelphia, Pa ND 6
    Jun 26 Jack Munroe Philadelphia, Pa ND 6
    Jul 13 Morris Harris Philadelphia, Pa KO 3
    -Some sources report "KO 1"
    Jul 13 Black Bill (Claude Brooks) Philadelphia, Pa ND 6
    Jul 18 John "Sandy" Ferguson Chelsea, Ma WF 7
    Jul 24 Joe Grim Philadelphia, Pa ND 6
    Nov 25 Joe Jeannette Philadelphia, Pa LF 2
    Dec 1 "Young" Peter Jackson Baltimore, Md D 12
    -This bout was a "Pre-Arranged Draw";
    Some sources report "W 12"
    Dec 2 Joe Jeannette Philadelphia, Pa ND 6

    1906
    Jan 16 Joe Jeannette New York, NY ND 3
    Jan 26 Bob Kerns Topeka, Ks KO 1
    Mar 14 Joe Jeannette Baltimore, Md W 15
    Apr 19 Black Bill (Claude Brooks) Wilkes-Barre, Pa KO 6
    Apr 26 Sam Langford Chelsea, Ma W 15
    -Johnson knocked Langford down twice
    Jun 18 Charles Haghey Gloucester, Pa KO 2
    Sep 3 Billy Dunning Millinocket, Me D 10
    Sep 20 Joe Jeannette Philadelphia, Pa ND 6
    Nov 8 Jim Jeffords Lancaster, Pa ND 6
    Nov 26 Joe Jeannette Portland, Me D 10
    Dec 9 Joe Jeannette New York, NY W 3

    1907
    Jan 28 Peter Kling Sydney, NSW, Aus EX 3
    Jan 29 Peter Kling Sydney, NSW, Aus EX 3
    Jan 30 Peter Kling Sydney, NSW, Aus EX 3
    Jan 31 Peter Kling Sydney, NSW, Aus EX 3
    Feb 1 Peter Kling Sydney, NSW, Aus EX 3
    Feb 4 Larry Foley Sydney, NSW, Aus EX 3
    Feb 5 Mick Dunn Sydney, NSW, Aus EX 3
    Feb 6 Bill Thompson Sydney, NSW, Aus EX 3
    Feb 7 Jack Thompson Sydney, NSW, Aus EX 3
    Feb 8 Jack Thompson Sydney, NSW, Aus EX 3
    Feb 9 Jack Thompson Sydney, NSW, Aus EX 3
    Feb 19 Peter Felix Sydney, NSW, Aus KO 1
    -Colored Heavyweight Championship of the World;
    Some sources report 12/19/06
    Feb 28 Starlight (Edward Rollins) Melbourne, Vic, Aus EX 4
    Feb 28 Syd Russell Melbourne, Vic, Aus EX 4
    -The previous 2 bouts were held the same date
    Mar 1 Syd Russell Melbourne, Vic, Aus EX 3
    Mar 2 Dick Kernick Melbourne, Vic, Aus EX 3
    Mar 4 Bill Lang Melbourne, Vic, Aus KO 9
    Jul 17 Bob Fitzsimmons Philadelphia, Pa KO 2
    Aug 28 Kid Cutler Reading, Pa KO 1
    Sep 12 Sailor Burke Bridgeport, Ct ND 6
    Nov 2 "Fireman" Jim Flynn Colma, Ca KO 11
    -Some sources report "San Francisco, Ca"

    1908
    Jan 3 Joe Jeannette New York, NY D 3
    Jun 11 Al McNamara Plymouth, Eng EX 4
    Jul 31 Ben Taylor Plymouth, Eng KO 8
    Dec 22 Larry Foley Sydney, NSW, Aus EX 4
    Dec 26 Tommy Burns Sydney, NSW, Aus W 14
    -Heavyweight Championship of the World;
    Police intervened; As per prior
    agreement, a decision was awarded
    by the referee

    1909
    Mar 10 Victor McLaglen Vancouver, BC, Can EX 6
    -Early sources report this bout as a Heavyweight
    Championship of the World contest
    Apr Frank Moran Pittsburgh, Pa EX 4
    A.J.D. Biddle Merchantville, NJ EX
    May 19 "Philadelphia" Jack O'Brien Philadelphia, Pa ND 6
    -Heavyweight Championship of the World
    Jun 15 George Byers Boston, Ma EX 3
    Jun 30 Tony Ross Pittsburgh, Pa ND 6
    -Heavyweight Championship of the World
    Aug 12 Kid Cutler Brooklyn, NY EX
    Sep 9 Al Kaufmann San Francisco, Ca ND 10
    -Heavyweight Championship of the World
    Oct 11 Ed "Gunboat" Smith San Francisco, Ca EX 4
    Oct 16 Stanley Ketchel Colma, Ca KO 12
    -Heavyweight Championship of the World
    Dec 1 Kid Cutler New York, NY SCH
    Dec 1 Jack Hynan New York, NY SCH
    -The previous 2 bouts were scheduled;
    The outcomes are not known
    1910
    Apr 28 an unnamed opponent Los Angeles, Ca EX
    Apr 28 an unnamed opponent Los Angeles, Ca EX
    -The previous 2 bouts were held the same date
    May George "Kid" Cotton Reno, Nv EX
    Jul Al Kaufmann Reno, Nv EX
    Jul 3 George "Kid" Cotton San Francisco, Ca EX
    Jul 4 Jim Jeffries Port Richmond, Ca SCH
    -This bout was scheduled but not held;
    The Governor would not allow this bout
    to be held in California
    Jul 4 Jim Jeffries Reno, Nv KO 15
    -Heavyweight Championship of the World
    Oct -Johnson raced automobiles at Coney Island, NY
    Against Barney Oldfield and lost two races

    1911
    Jan -Johnson married Etta Duryea
    Sep 11 -Etta Duryea committed suicide
    Oct 2 "Bombardier" Billy Wells London, Eng SCH
    -This bout was scheduled but not held

    1912
    Mar 8 Frank Hoe Indianapolis, In EX 4
    Jun 21 –Johnson was indicted for smuggling a diamond
    necklace into the United States
    Jul 4 "Fireman" Jim Flynn Las Vegas, NM WF 9
    -Heavyweight Championship of the World;
    Police intervened;
    Some sources report "TK 9"
    Jul 11 –Johnson opened the Cafe de Champion in Chicago, Il
    Oct 12 –Johnson was arrested for violating the White Slave
    Traffic Act
    Dec 4 –Johnson married Lucille Cameron

    1913
    May 14 –Johnson was convicted in Chicago, Il of violating
    the White Slave Traffic Act
    Jun 4 –Johnson was sentenced to a term of imprisonment of
    one year and one day plus a fine of $1,000
    June -Johnson fled the United States while free with an
    Appeal pending
    Oct -The French Federation of Boxing Clubs stripped
    Johnson of the Heavyweight Championship but the
    IBU refused to do so
    Urbach Paris, Fr EX
    -This was a wrestling match; Johnson won;
    Falls: 2-0
    Nov 28 Jimmy Esson Paris, Fr EX
    -This was a wrestling match; Johnson lost;
    Falls: 2-0
    Nov 28 Andre Sproul Paris, Fr EX 2
    -This was a match between a boxer (Johnson) and a
    wrestler (Sproul); Johndon knocked Sproul out;
    The contest turned into a riot
    Dec 19 "Battling" Jim Johnson Paris, Fr D 10
    -Heavyweight Championship of the World
    This bout was scheduled for 20 rounds but
    terminated after 10 rounds due to arm injury
    to the Champion

    1914
    Mar 10 an unnamed opponent Gothenburg, Swe EX
    -This was a wrestling match;
    Some sources call this man “G.H.”, a law student
    Mar 10 Taumisto Gothenburg, Swe EX
    -This was a wrestling match
    Jun 27 Frank Moran Paris, Fr W 20
    -Heavyweight Championship of the World
    Dec 15 Jack Murray Buenos Aires, Arg EX 3
    -Johnson knocked Murray out

    1915
    Jan 10 Segundo Guiralechea Buenos Aires, Arg EX 1
    -Johnson knocked Guiralecha out
    Jan 10 Enrique Wilkinson Buenos Aires, Arg EX 1
    -Johnson knocked Wilkinson out
    Jan 10 Jack Murray Buenos Aires, Arg EX 1
    -Johnson knocked Murray out
    Apr Mills Havana, Cu EX
    Apr Scott Havana, Cu EX
    Apr Bell Havana, Cu EX
    Apr 3 Sam McVea Havana, Cu EX 6
    Apr 5 Jess Willard Havana, Cu LK 26
    -Heavyweight Championship of the World

    1916
    Mar 10 Frank Crozier Madrid, Sp W 10
    Jul 10 Arthur Cravan Barcelona, Sp KO 6

    1918
    Apr 3 Blink McCloskey Madrid, Sp W 4

    1919
    Feb 12 Bill Flint Madrid, Sp KO 2
    Apr 7 Tom Cowler Mexico City, Mx D 10
    Jun 2 Tom Cowler Mexico City, Mx KO 12
    Jul 4 Paul Sampson Mexico City, Mx KO 6
    Aug 10 Marty Cutler Mexico City, Mx KO 4
    Sep 28 "Captain" Bob Roper Mexico City, Mx W 10

    *** Dates and results of the bouts in Mexico are still being searched ***

    1920
    Apr 18 Bob Wilson Mexicali, Mx KO 3
    Apr 21 Ray Neal Tijuana, Mx EX 4
    May 17 George Roberts Tijuana, Mx KO 3
    Jul 4 Al Norton Tijuana, Mx SCH
    -This bout was scheduled but cancelled;
    Local residents protested
    Jul 20 -Johnson crossed the border into the United States
    from Mexico and surrendered to Federal agents; He
    was sent to Leavenworth prison
    Nov 25 Frank Owens Leavenworth, Ks KO 6
    Nov 25 "Topeka" Jack Johnson Leavenworth, Ks W 5
    Nov 30 George Owens Leavenworth, Ks KO 6

    1921
    Apr 15 Jack Townsend Leavenworth, Ks KO 6
    May 28 John Allen Leavenworth, Ks EX 2
    May 28 Joe Boykin Leavenworth, Ks KO 5
    Jul 9 -Johnson was released from Leavenworth Prison
    Sep 2 Charles "Kid" Crutchfield Pittsburgh, Pa EX 3

    1922
    Floyd Johnson EX
    Sep 4 George Godfrey Chicago, Il EX 3
    Sep 5 George Godfrey Chicago, Il EX 3
    Sep 6 George Godfrey Chicago, Il EX 3

    1923
    May 6 Walter “Farmer” Lodge Havana, Cu KO 4
    May 20 Jack Thompson Havana, Cu ND 15
    Sep Battling Siki Montreal, Que, Can EX 6
    Sep Silas Green Montreal, Que, Can EX 2
    Oct 1 Battling Siki Quebec, Que, Can EX 6
    Oct Battling Siki Sherbrooke, Que, Can EX
    -This bout was held during Sep-Oct 1923
    Oct Jack Ward in New England EX 4
    -This bout was held during Sep-Oct 1923

    1924
    Feb 22 Homer Smith Montreal, Que, Can W 10
    Aug James "Tut" Jackson Hammond, In SCH
    -This bout was scheduled but not held;
    The Governor of Indiana (Branch) prevented
    the bout from being held
    Sep Brad Simmons Drumright, Ok SCH
    -This bout was scheduled; The outcome is not known

    -Johnson divorced Lucille Cameron during 1924

    1925
    Feb 3 Eddie Marshall Cedar Rapids, Ia EX 3
    Feb 3 Marty Cutler Cedar Repids, Ia EX 3
    -The previous 2 bouts were held the same date
    Mar Emil "Red" Erspamer Hurley, Wi EX 4
    Aug -Johnson married Irene Pineau

    1926
    May 2 Pat Lester Nogales, Mx W 15
    May 30 Bob Lawson Juarez, Mx LT 8
    Jun Battling Norfolk L 10
    Sep 6 Brad Simmons Ponca City, Ok L 10

    1927
    "Big" Bill Hartwell EX 4

    1928
    Apr 16 Ed "Bearcat" Wright Topeka, Ks LK 5
    May 15 "Big" Bill Hartwell Kansas City, Ks LT 7
    Isaac "Ike" McFowler EX 6

    1930
    "Philadelphia" Jack O'Brien EX 3

    1931
    Mar 4 Brad Simmons Tulsa, Ok L 10
    Apr 28 Brad Simmons Wichita, Ks KO 2
    Apr 30 -Johnson and Simmons were barred from boxing in Topeka, Ks
    Chief White Horse EX 3
    Brad Simmons Tulsa, Ok EX 3
    Jun 11 Dynamite Jackson Los Angeles, Ca EX 3
    Jul 8 Bob Frazier Seattle, Wa EX 4
    Jul 16 Dee Richmond Dishman, Id EX 3
    Jul 18 Floyd Johnson Seattle, Wa EX 4

    1932
    Nov 29 Dick Anderson Chicago, Il KO 3

    1933
    Jan 20 Maurice Griselle Paris, Fr EX 1
    Jan 20 Ernst Guehring Paris, Fr EX 1
    -The previous 2 bouts were held the same date

    1938
    Sep 1 Walter Price Boston, Ma LT 7

    1944
    Wilbur DeCora Ida Grove, Ia EX 2
    an unnamed opponent Spencer City, Ia EX 2
    Henry Neumann Sioux City, Ia EX 2

    1945
    Nov 27 Joe Jeannette New York, NY EX 3
    Nov 27 John Ballcort New York, NY EX 3
    -The previous 2 bouts were held the same date
    As part of a World War II Bond Rally;
    One minute rounds were fought

    *** The Following Bouts Are Reported But Not Confirmed ***

    1898
    Hank Griffin Bakersfield, Ca KO 65
    1904
    Larry Temple Philadelphia, Pa ND 4
    -Temple lasted; This bout may have been an
    exhibition; Reportedly, Johnson contracted
    to knock Temple out in four rounds

    1906
    C.A.C. Smith Minneapolis, Mn W

    1908-1910
    Ed "Gunboat" Smith Oakland, Ca EX

    1910
    Frank Moran Pittsburgh, Pa EX 4

    1914
    Philip Piersenn Blyth, Eng EX 5

    1915
    Battling Jim Johnson KO 1

    1916
    Mar 25 Arthur Gruhan Madrid, Sp W 10

    1920
    Harry Cook EX 3

    1924-1925
    Chuck Wiggins Indianapolis, In EX 3
    -Some sources report 1919-1920


    *** Assistance Was Provided By Sergei Yurchenko ***

    *** Some Data Was Provided By Alister Scott Ottesen ***

    *** Some Data Was Provided By David Erspamer ***

    *** NCR ALL-TIME HEAVYWEIGHT COMPUTER TOURNAMENT ***
    1968
    Max Baer L 15
    Record courtesy of Tracy Callis, Historian, International Boxing Research Organization

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    Re: The 100th Anniversary of the First “Fight of the Century”

    I read about this fight my whole life. My Grandfather remembered it very well. he was a big fight fan as was my father. It's a shame that skin color was the big thing instead of two great champions were fighting. Even in 1971 with Ali and Frazier race was still a big issue. I glad that is behind us in 2010. Today there is a white HW champion and nobody cares. 100 years ago today was a great fight. That how I choose to remember it.

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    Re: The 100th Anniversary of the First “Fight of the Century”

    Skin colour was sadly still an issue for the Holmes v Cooney fight in 1982 as well.

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    Re: The 100th Anniversary of the First “Fight of the Century”

    I have long harbored the suspicion that Edgar Rice Burroughs's first Tarzan novel--published in 1912--constituted a more or less conscious fantasy of the Great White Hope: the white man triumphant over black men in the very heart of the dark continent.

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