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Thread: Bob Satterfield

  1. #61
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    Re: Bob Satterfield

    I had a chance to see the movie over the weekend. I thought it was very enjoyable. But I was very surpised at the low turnout. There couldn't have been more than 15 people in the whole theater for a 5:00 showing.

  2. #62
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    Re: Bob Satterfield

    How close to the real story was it??? I heard they were makeing it a thriller and changeing eveything, even heard one report the Homeless man was the REAL Bob Satterfield or something like that.?? Was it Hollywood like the Hurriccain?

  3. #63
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    Re: Bob Satterfield

    Quote Originally Posted by cmoyle
    I had a chance to see the movie over the weekend. I thought it was very enjoyable. But I was very surpised at the low turnout. There couldn't have been more than 15 people in the whole theater for a 5:00 showing.
    I didn't even know it was out already. Not much $ in the promotion.

  4. #64
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    Re: Bob Satterfield

    I caught it and liked it ...

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    Re: Bob Satterfield

    The review opens with this paragraph: "The drama 'Resurrecting the Champ' opens with an analogy between writing and boxing. Both activities require you to put your talent forward and stand alone."

    This quote reminds me of the line some smart person contributed one time: "Boxing is like dancing, except that there's no music and the dancers get to hit each other."

    So writing is like boxing, except there's no ring, no gloves, no referee, and typically no throwing punches at one another.

    (Well, typically no punches are thrown . . .)

    Really, the worst deviation between boxing and writing is that, in writing, you don't get a ring card girl sashaying around every time you put in a hard three minutes at the keyboard.

    But that's a good idea. I do a lot of writing in my line of work. I'm sure that I could be far more productive if, every three minutes that I wrote, a ring card girl came in and swayed her hips around my office.

    I'll go ask the managing partner about that . . .

  6. #66
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    Re: Bob Satterfield

    I really hope the film does well, and I hope they stayed true to the real story as that IS the REAL STORY that interests.

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    Re: Bob Satterfield

    Ressurecting the ChampC
    Opens: August 24, 2007

    Sundance Film Fest 2007--After a decade of making disappointing features (see below), Rod Lurie finally begins to show some progress as a dramatist with "Resurrecting the Champ," an old-fashioned, overwrought, calculated saga that seemed to have been made with an eye on the box-office.

    Premiering at the Sundance Film Festival in January, "Resurrecting the Camp" divided film critics. Some liked better the sports elements and the Samuel Jackson character, whereas others favored the newspaper yarn with Josh Hartnett, though most agreed that neither is particularly fresh or insightful.

    It does help that the two lead characters, an aging former boxer and a young reporter, are played by pros like Samuel L. Jackson and the likable Josh Hartnett, though, despite growing experience, the latter is too bland and still lacking acting chops.

    Lurie is a former critic, and as such, must have watched countless Hollywood sports and news melodramas. As he showed in "The Contender," Lurie has a good nose for timely issues, except that to see a drama about an ambitious but immoral newspaper reporter is not exactly news. The public has become so cynical about journos that thematically there is not much new in this crowd-pleasing potboiler.

    Based on J.R. Moehringer's a true story that first appeared in the Los Angeles Times, and scripted by Michael Bortman and Allison Burnett, "Resurrecting the Champ" (a good title) is the tale of a reporter's fall from grace—not unlike the Billy Ray's "Shattered Glass," a far superior film, about the New Republic pathological liar journalist Stephen Glass (well played by Hayden Christensen).

    Hartnett plays Denver sports reporter Erik, an over-achiever careerists (he produces more contents than his colleagues), itching for a brighter future in his newspaper's magazine section; he's lured with an offer from a producer (Teri Hatcher) with a major TV network. As you know from numerous films, eagerly ambitious pros pay a price for their immoral and amoral drives.

    Soon Erik's editor Metz (a solid Alan Alda) complains that Erik's writing is sloppy, listless, even mechanical. Careless with researching his subjects, Erik shows both ignorance and superficiality when it comes to basic facts.

    This is evident in his first encounter with Champ (Jackson), who claims he is the noted contender Bob Satterfield. Erik has never heard of Satterfield, and doesn't even bother to check the validity of the man's story. Clearly Erik is not very bright—-any person who meets someone like Champ would have rushed to his computer and google his name. Instead, Erik is so happy to have found a good story that he becomes more blasé and even disrespectful.

    Aged by makeup and wearing a gray wig, Jackson plays another version of a homeless, drunk, crazy man that he did in Kasi Lemmons' sophomore jinx, "Caveman's Valentine." Satterfield is also a victim, someone the local boys beat up just for fun. But he still is sober enough to know a good listener and sucker when he meets one like Erik. There are also benefits to be had for his cooperation; Erik hands him out generously food and money.

    Like in his previous films, Lurie can't locate the locus of his drama is, so in the film's second half of the film, story switches to Erik, who is far less interesting and more predictable character than the Champ, not to speak of the inexpressive turn given by Hartnett, who simply cannot carry a movie on his broad and attractive shoulders.

    Too bad that Lurie is not content to keep his tale within the confines of the newsroom, for there is much more drama there, particularly when the Champ's story takes on an unexpected life of its own—-not unlike other Hollywood features, say Capra's "Meet John Doe," or more recently "Absence of Malice." (In his immorality, stupidity, and carelessness, Harnett's Erik reminded me of the same "qualities" that Sally Field had as a journo in the above Sydney Pollack's 1981 picture).

    Unfortunately, we get to know too much bout Erik's domestic life, his estranged wife Joyce (Kathryn Morris), and his relationship with his son Teddy (TV's Dakota Goyo in his feature debut). Turns out Erik is not only a lousy professional, he's also a lousy dad. He feeds Teddy with fabricated stories about celebrities; no wonder the boy is disappointed and disrespectful.

    The yarn's redemption element is so formulaic and predictable that you wished the ending were more ambiguous or open-ended. But understandably, having made three commercial flops in a row, and a TV series that didn't last long, Lurie knows all too well the market value of a sentimental, upbeat denouement.

  8. #68
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    Re: Bob Satterfield

    Another review.

    August 23, 2007 - Inspired by a Los Angeles Times Magazine article by J.R. Moehringer -- and the fallout from it -- the Rod Lurie-directed drama Resurrecting the Champ is as much about fathers, sons and journalistic ethics as it is about boxing.

    When small-time Denver Times sports reporter Erik Kernan (Josh Hartnett) meets a homeless man known as "The Champ" (Samuel L. Jackson), he realizes he may have finally found the story that will launch him into the big time and win him the respect of his peers. "The Champ" says he's actually "Battling Bob Satterfield," a boxer who was thought to have died years before.

    Satterfield was a highly regarded pugilist in his day, but now Erik finds him living in a cardboard box in an alley. Erik believes he's scooped the story of a lifetime, one that will finally get him out of the shadow of his late sports broadcaster father (who also abandoned him as a child). Going behind his editor's (Alan Alda) back, Erik finds overnight success when a major magazine makes it their cover story.

    Landing a second job as a TV personality on Showtime (where his boss is played by Teri Hatcher), Erik is enjoying his newfound respect -- especially the look in the eyes of his adoring son Teddy (Dakota Goyo), to whom he's told more than a few tall tales (such as being buddies with John Elway). He's also still pining for his wife and co-worker Joyce (Kathryn Morris), from whom he is separated.

    Unfortunately, serious doubts are soon raised about the veracity of Erik's story and the true identity of "The Champ" -- revelations which threaten Erik's professional success and cause both men to come to terms with themselves.





    As important as the bond between Erik and "Champ" is, the heart of this film is the relationship between Erik and his son. It is through resolving his own father issues that Erik is finally able to do right by the subject of his story. Likewise, "Champ" has his own painful past that he needs to confront if he's to ever get his life together.

    As "The Champ," Jackson may look like he's in the sequel to The Caveman's Valentine, but he offers his most nuanced and heartfelt performance in years. It's such a treat to see him play a subtle and vulnerable character after years of portraying bellicose bad guys and hard-ass authority figures. He could very well land an Oscar nom for this.

    Hartnett is also solid as Erik, managing to make his character sympathetic even at his most deceitful. His flaws stem not from ambition or greed, but rather weakness and desperation to be a better dad and writer. In a different film, the scenes between Erik and his son Teddy could have proven too saccharine to bear, but the performances (and Lurie's direction) are wisely restrained.

    Because it focuses on characters and relationships rather than merely the more sensational aspects of the story, Resurrecting the Champ delivers a knock-out.

  9. #69
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    Re: Bob Satterfield

    Saw the movie the other day and thought it was a pretty good tale.
    After reading the earlier part of this thread as it pertains to the film, I have some questions. The twist that reveals Champ is not Satterfield revolves around a clip identified by a former trainer. He tells Erik that he is looking at the wrong fighter ... the OTHER guy is Satterfield and the one he has been speaking to, and who Satterfield is fighting in the clip, is "Tommy Kincaide."
    + First, there is no one listed in Boxrec by that name and I never heard of any such fighter. I've read a lot about Marciano and the 1940s-50s heavies.
    + Second, if we assume it's Tommy Harrison being portrayed, he never fought Satterfield. So, that scene is either fictitious or it's not Harrison. The fighter referred to as Kincaide (Champ) may be an amalgam of several guys ...?
    Thoughts?

  10. #70
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    Re: Bob Satterfield

    He has always been one of my favorite fighters who I have studied intensely.

    It is always amazing to me how boxing produces so many men who lurk in the ranks, that can stand up to someone like Bob, when getting hit cleanly on the jaw by him would be the end for most.

    His up and down career was just a war zone. His great power and come and get you philosophy was costly and exciting to watch.

    Archie Moore knocked him down 4 times in stopping Bob, Sam Baroudi who Ezzard Charles killed in the ring, knocked Bob down 7 times yet Bob at 176 lbs took out substitute Cleveland Williams 201lbs in brutal fashion.

    Bob lost to Harold Johnson but also beat him. Satterfield's fight with powerhouse Tommy Gomez was also brutal with Gomez suffering a broken rib in the first round and finally being unable to continue. Bob beat Nino Valdez but lost to guys like Bob Foxworth by one round KO and he lost to Albert Johnson.

    Losing to Moore, Maxim, Johnson, Charles and Holman Williams is no disgrace, nor to Jake Lamotta at 167lbs. I saw his fights against Charles, Johnson, Henry,Baker, Layne and he was something, swinging for the seats at all times with a devastating left hook and overhand rights.

    I always tell my boxing classes about him.

    Ron

  11. #71
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    Re: Bob Satterfield

    >>>He has always been one of my favorite fighters who I have studied intensely.<<<

    I agree!!! I wish that espn would open up it's vast library of fights so we could see what there is of Satterfield. He certainly electrified Chicago for several years and had he not been as chinny as he was, Satterfield very well may have been a champion.

    Based on his excitment, does anyone think that Satterfield should be in the HOF?

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