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Thread: Top Ten Fighters Who Died In The Ring

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    Top Ten Fighters Who Died In The Ring

    By Paul Magno, Yahoo!
    There's no sport more brutal or unforgiving than professional boxing. With approximately two thousand deaths directly attributed to in-ring battle since the adopting of the Marquis of Queensberry rules, boxing has established itself as the most dangerous sport in the world.

    Here's a list of the 10 most recognizable fighters who literally gave the sport their all. Forgive any omissions and, please, feel free to honor other fallen heroes in the comment section of this article:

    Benny "Kid" Paret (35-12-3, 10 KOs) (1937-1962)


    Former world welterweight champ, Paret, lost his life in the third installment of his brutal trilogy with Emile Griffith at Madison Square Garden. Paret's TKO 12 loss resulted in the Cuban star falling into a coma and dying 10 days later without ever regaining consciousness.

    Davey Moore (59-7-1, 30 KOs) (1933-1963)

    The former featherweight champ died from injuries sustained in a bout with "Sugar" Ramos in 1963 when his neck and brain stem suffered damage, hitting the bottom rope during a knockdown. The incident inspired the Bob Dylan song, "Who Killed Davey Moore?"

    Johnny Owen (25-2-1, 11 KOs) (1956-1980)

    Welshman Owen died after being knocked out by Lupe Pintor in a bid for Pintor's WBC bantamweight title. Owen would slip into a coma and eventually die from a respiratory infection related to his life support apparatus.

    Deuk-Koo Kim (17-2-1, 8 KOs) (1959-1982)

    South Korea's Kim lost his life after being stopped in the 14th round of a brutal war with Ray "Boom Boom" Mancini as he challenged for Mancini's WBA lightweight title. The nationally-televised death inspired the move to reduce the number of rounds in championship fights from 15 to 12.

    Leavander Johnson (34-5-2, 26 KOs) (1969-2005)

    Former lightweight champ, Johnson, would collapse in his dressing room following his TKO 11 loss to Jesus Chavez on HBO. He was placed into a medically-induced coma, but passed away five days later.

    Jimmy Doyle (43-7-3, 14 KOs) (1924-1947)

    Doyle lost his life in an attempt to take the world welterweight title from defending champ, "Sugar" Ray Robinson. A year prior to the TKO 8 loss to Robinson, Doyle had suffered head injuries against Artie Levine that were considered, "career threatening."

    Yo-Sam Choi (32-5, 19 KOs) (1972-2008)

    South Korea's Choi, a former world jr. flyweight champ who moved up to capture the WBO Inter-Continental flyweight title, died from injuries sustained in his successful title defense over Heri Amol. After the bout, Choi collapsed in the ring and was rushed to the hospital, never to regain consciousness. He was removed from life support eight days later.

    Jimmy Garcia (35-5, 25 KOs) (1971-1995)

    Two-time world title challenger, Garcia lost his life against defending super featherweight champion, Gabriel Ruelas, on the Oscar De la Hoya-Rafael Ruelas pay-per-view undercard. Garcia would collapse in his corner at the end of the 10th round and pass away from a brain injury 13 days later.

    Pedro Alcazar (25-1-1, 14 KOs) (1975-2002)

    Alcazar, a single parent of two, would collapse and pass away in his Las Vegas Hotel room 36 hours after his TKO 6 loss to Fernando Montiel in a failed bid to defend his WBO super flyweight title.

    Willie Classen (16-7-2, 9 KOs) (1950-1979)

    Former New York Golden Gloves winner, Classen, lost his life from a brain injury after a 10-round KO loss to top middleweight contender, Wilford Scypion at the Felt Forum in NY.

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    Re: Top Ten Fighters Who Died In The Ring

    Former bantamweight champ Tony Marino killed in 1st bout after losing title.
    Top heavyweight contender Ernie Schaaf died in 13th round of bout with Primo Carnera.
    Lightweight contender Sonny Boy West, first fatality seen on network TV after being KO'd by Percy Bassett in 1950.
    Highly regarded heavyweight prospect Frankie Campbell died from bout with Max Baer.

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    Re: Top Ten Fighters Who Died In The Ring

    I wrote this a couple of years ago for Dan Cuoco's, Internationl Boxing Research Org a couple of years ago & realised this thread would be an appropriate setting for this piece aboutmy friend, former featherweight champion, Davey Moore.



    My Memories of Davey Moore
    By Stephen Gordon/AKA GorDoom

    Where to begin? I’ve been avoiding writing about this for decades as it is such a painful memory…. My dear friend & the Dicta….er, Director of IBRO, Dan Cuoco, & I share a real passion for certain 50’s & 60’s fighters.

    Chief among them has always been Eder Jofre & Davey Moore. Dan informed me that he was writing a piece on Davey & wanted me to augment it & talk to his family to get certain facts straight.

    Dan provided me with contact info & after 47 years I finally spoke to Geraldine, Davey’s wife. She is a remarkable woman. She has a very positive & upbeat outlook on life. As Dan mentioned, she has absolutely no bitterness toward, boxing, Sugar Ramos or Willie Ketchum.

    She is the matriarch of a rather large extended family & appears to joyfully revel in being a grandmother. She is also at 73 mentally as sharp as a tack.

    My main reason for talking to her other than to touch base was to find out if Ketchum ever gave her Davey’s purse from the Ramos fight. He had also made statements about how Davey was well off with quite a bit of property & a $300.00 a month annuity.

    Well none of this turns out to be true. There was no annuity or parcels of real estate. He did own a house but that was it.

    I asked her about Davey’s purse & she said it had been so long it was hard to remember. She does remember that she only got a few thousand from Ketchum.

    She said he took a 50% cut & deducted expenses which is really wrong as promoters pay those expenses which include travel, lodging, meals & training facilities. But then, Ketchum’s rep was never exactly stellar ….

    I asked her how she survived as a single mother in the 60’s because it must have been very difficult. She said both Davey’s side of the family & her’s stepped up to the plate & gave her & the kids a lot of emotional & financial support.

    Another benefactor was the Governor of Ohio, who was a big fan of Davey’s. He felt something should be done to help the family & offered her a job in the Governor’s office that she worked from 1963 to 1996 when she retired.

    She is doing fine as she has a good pension from the state after all her years of service. I intend to keep in touch with her from now on.

    Which brings me to my memories of Davey Moore:

    My father was a professional heavyweight boxer under Willie Ketchum’s management before he was forced to retire due to the advent of World War II.

    Davey Moore was in Mexico City in May 1958 to fight Roberto Garcia at the Plaza De Toros Bull Ring. Willie Ketchum called my father, who was then working for the U.S. government and based in Mexico City, and he invited us to come to visit him and Davey at their hotel.

    The next day Davey, Willie Ketchum and Davey’s trainer Teddy Bentham came to our house for dinner. Davey loved to play checkers and he and I played checkers for hours over the ensuing couple of weeks.

    I found him to be a very quiet, humble, serious & sensitive guy. He was very religious and someone who obviously loved his family. He constantly talked about his wife and kids and how much he missed them when he was on the road.

    The day of the fight it started to rain and the fight was postponed and pushed back a day. Davey, Willie, Teddy, my mother, father & I left the Plaza De Toros after the weigh-in and as we walked into the parking lot it was storming & a substantial crowd of enraged fight fans saw Davey and charged us all the while yelling & screaming at Davey as if he was responsible for the postponement!

    One of them suddenly jumped in front of my father with a knife in his hand and my father knocked him to the ground hard with a chopping right causing the crowd to immediately part like the Red Sea & we were able to navigate to our vehicle.

    The incident really upset Davey. He said as he was crying, ”Why do they hate me so much, what have I done to them.” He had never experienced anything like that before. After Davey calmed down, he eventually got pissed at how we were treated and vowed to take it out on Garcia when he got him in the ring.

    The fight took place the next day, and we sat in the front row. Davey dominated the fight from start to finish and dropped Garcia a couple of times. As the fight neared its end, a group of loud intoxicated Mexican fight fans located in the higher seats started wrapping up Sunday newspapers, dousing them with tequila, then lighting them on fire & throwing dozens of them down to the front of the crowd. It turned into a wild scene and got downright scary. Once the decision was announced in Davey’s favor they actually threw a few snakes into the ring!

    I asked Geraldine if Davey had mention the surreal scene & she said oh yes, he had told her in detail what happened & how crazy it was.

    After Davey was announced the winner by unanimous decision the crowd REALLY went nuts. We ended up having to be escorted to the dressing room under heavy police guard.

    I ended up translating for Davey to the horde of reporters covering the fight. A picture of Davey & 8 year old me was taken during the interview & appeared on the front sports page of the Mexico City newspapers the next day.

    The next time I saw Davey was when he stopped Gil Cadilli in San Jose, CA, a month before his fight with Sugar Ramos. At that time my father was retired from the government and we were living in San Francisco.

    After the fight my father and I met with Davey and Willie in Davey’s dressing room and Willie invited us to Davey’s next fight with Sugar Ramos.

    For the Moore-Ramos fight we had front row seats and I remember the atmosphere in Dodger stadium was electric. Davey was winning the early rounds and then Ramos started coming on. In the tenth round Ramos dropped Davey and his head hit the turnbuckle and ring post. He somehow made it to his feet and was able to make it to the end of the round. The fight was stopped between rounds.

    Davey did an interview with Don Dunphy in the ring before walking back to his dressing room. I was standing against the wall in the corner of the dressing room with my dad while Davey was talking to reporters. I heard him say that he had an off-night and that he was looking forward to a rematch and regaining the title. Then all of a sudden he started holding his head and said: “Oh man, it hurts so bad” & then he collapsed.

    Davey was a hero of mine and it really shook me up. I was only 12 years old & It’s still a very painful memory that remains with me to this day. Ever since then, whenever I watch a fight in which a fighter is knocked out and doesn’t get up immediately, or is taking a lot of punishment, I think of poor Davey Moore and question my love for the sport.

    Writing this for the IBRO Journal has actually been cathartic for me. I realize now I spent the last 47 years trying to avoid this deep scar of a memory. Of course it was unavoidable & I have to thank Dan Cuoco for writing the article & forcing me to confront & deal with the memories.

    Like I said it was cathartic. I feel like a massive dark cloud has finally been lifted from my psyche.

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    Re: Top Ten Fighters Who Died In The Ring

    This list, strikes me as macabre......are they running out of shit to write about in Boxing,

    WKS

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    Re: Top Ten Fighters Who Died In The Ring

    First of all, I'll take issue with Magno's posit that "boxing has established itself as the most dangerous sport in the world". If one includes all levels of the various contact sports, worldwide, I would bet my bottom dollar that football outpaces boxing in mortality rates, historically.

    I also would agree that the article's title is borderline offensive: "Top Ten Fighters Who Died In the Ring"? What was the criteria used to come up with such a ham-handed header? And how can one take Magno seriously when he leaves the likes of Sam Baroudi, Georgie Flores and Beethaeven Scottland off of his morbid list?

    Baroudi's deeply affected Ezz Charles' psyche and ring style forever. Flores' death was a scandalous affair, with the NY commission, the IBC and the sport itself being tried in both a civil court and the court of public opinion. Bee Scottland's death was easily-preventable and pointed out the piss-poor judgment of referee Mercante, Jr. and the ill-prepared medical response to his Scottland's needs when he was knocked out by George Khalid Jones on board the U.S.S. Intrepid.

    Magno's article--as it did with this very response--will inevitably provoke debate, but one has to wonder as to why he or his web editor didn't put a little more thought into how the choices were made, or for providing a more apropos title for the piece.

    I don't know if this has been posted previously, but for those interested in a more scholarly take on the subject, here's a link:

    http://ejmas.com/jcs/jcsart_svinth_b_0700.htm

    Regards,
    Kyoodle

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    Re: Top Ten Fighters Who Died In The Ring

    Quote Originally Posted by Wladimir Klitschko Sucks View Post
    This list, strikes me as macabre......are they running out of shit to write about in Boxing,

    WKS
    I agree, WKS.

    I hope no one seeks to view, or collects, "death fights".

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    Re: Top Ten Fighters Who Died In The Ring

    I've also heard that more people die from skiing. (Watch out for that tree!)

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    Re: Top Ten Fighters Who Died In The Ring

    More kids die playing high school football in the USA than boxers do EVERY years. That is a statistical fact.

    GorDoom

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    Re: Top Ten Fighters Who Died In The Ring

    Can't forget Luther McCarty either. Pretty good record up until his death.

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    Re: Top Ten Fighters Who Died In The Ring

    Little can be compared to the three ring deaths that wiped out most of one man's stable of fighters.....Frank Churchill allegedly died a broken man in 1934 after his three Filipino Stalwarts, Dencio Cabanella (1921) Pancho Villa (1925) and Clever Sencio(1926) all perished following ring combat.

    And though boxing may be dangerous, the only sport that has a specific rule against "Brutality" is still water polo. Case closed.

    hap

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    Re: Top Ten Fighters Who Died In The Ring

    not really well known world wide at the time of his death but francisco "kiko" bejines was a pretty good draw in L.A. at the time of his fatal bantamweight title fight with alberto davila.

    greg

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    Re: Top Ten Fighters Who Died In The Ring

    How deeply caan a ring death affect a popular venue?/

    After Frankie Campbell's death on August 25, 1930, all of the boxing shows in the S.F. bay area were cancelled. The death was the second one in a week there.

    The show at Hollywood Legion Stadium four days later still went on but every bout was stopped prematurely by overly cautious referees so that the entire program lasted lesss than an hour and that included a 15-minute break to repair faulty lighting in the stadium. Five bouts and all lasting less than five rounds. Paul Pirrone and Pete Meyers we in the main event that night.

    hap navarro

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    Re: Top Ten Fighters Who Died In The Ring

    Historically, serious injuries or deaths have caused the police and legislators (and even sanctioning bodies and the press) to come down hard on boxing, even though they did not and do not do the same with other sports. This sport has been a big target with a bullseye on it from the beginning. Hence, it definitely does not help the sport to publicize injuries. Folks get killed and paralyzed in football twice as much as boxing, and yet boxers get crapped on by the press and politicians. I have several quotes from old-time fighters calling attention to this fact. Make no mistake about it, the knee-jerk anti-boxing reaction is built into the psyche of society and there is a long history of it. Boxing fans and writers must always be cognizant of that.

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    Re: Top Ten Fighters Who Died In The Ring

    Boxing Safety and the Irrational Attacks on Boxing
    by Adam Pollack

    In 1894, then world heavyweight champion James J. Corbett compared boxing with football.

    The college men play football for glory, and it looks to me as though the highest aim of some of the players is to maim an opponent. The spectacle of one fellow on the ground with half a dozen others jumping on his neck may be a pleasant one to some folks. I want none of it in mine.

    When it comes to brutality there is nothing that I know of…which compares with football… Look over the record for this year alone and see the number of young men who have been permanently injured by being jumped on or kicked. Yet men and women who would hold up their hands in horror at the sight of a boxing glove pay fabulous prices to watch these brutal exhibitions and shout themselves hoarse before they get through.

    Boxing where professionals are concerned in it, is frowned upon by a majority of the people who patronize football games…. If I had sons, and they were in doubt as to whether they should become football players or professional boxers, I should advise them to take to the roped arena.

    World middleweight champion and future world heavyweight champion Bob Fitzsimmons noted the irony that boxing was illegal in many states, but football was popular in Ivy League schools.

    Talk about brutality. I went down to see the Princeton game, and every man in the lot was trying to kill somebody. It’s very funny, too, how those fellows will go into a game with the chances that they’ll come out crippled, and fight each other like bulls. And the minute you put a glove on a man and ask him to stand up and fight, he says: ‘Oh, no!’ The Princeton boys wanted to show me a few tackles and bucks, but I said: ‘Not any for me. That game’s a little too rough.’

    Fitzsimmons responded to the outcries when there is a death in boxing: “These fatalities coming close together and along with the talk of the big fight for the championship has made those who would bring the whole world to their way of thinking by force cry out. The result is always extreme measures. They will not be lasting.”

    A Nevada newspaper in 1897 said that a bill legalizing boxing in that state will “not have as demoralizing an effect on the public as a game of football.”

    On January 29, 1897, Governor Reinhold Sadler signed the bill legalizing boxing in Nevada. It required payment of $1,000 for a license, for doctors to examine the contestants before the fight, no liquor could be sold at the fight, and no bouts were to take place on Sunday. Thus began Nevada’s great and long association with the sport of boxing.

    Shortly after the governor signed the bill into law, one writer said in support,

    Squarely-conducted boxing exhibitions are not so brutal as footballing, which requires nothing but mule strength and capacity to endure kicks and the roughest kind of usage. It is the most brutalizing of all sports and should be tabooed. In comparison bare knuckle fighting is innocent pastime.

    Another said,

    Nothing is more exciting than to see two men equally matched in a spirited boxing contest, the art of self-defense is a noble one and should be encouraged at all times. People go mad over football and criticize boxing as brutal, but it is safe to say if they saw the latter their views would be changed.

    What was so wrong with boxing? After all, football was gaining increased popularity, and was very big in major colleges. In 1900, world heavyweight champion James J. Jeffries saw a football game. He commented,

    I never looked at so much lively slugging and roughing in all the years I’ve been in the fighting business. … If I had to take my choice between having a man punch me as hard as he could or run ten yards and jump on me with his shoulder against my stomach I think I’d take the punch. … But I don’t kick about it as lots of these football supporters kick against fighting.

    Jeff said that boxing was not one-half as rough as football.

    I notice that under these football rules they give a knocked-out man three minutes to recover and get into the game. Do you know what that means? It means that he has a chance to get hurt eighteen times as much at football as he has at fighting. Under Queensberry rules a man who can’t go on fighting within ten seconds after he is knocked down is out of the game. That’s a merciful rule. But at football they give a fellow three minutes and he can come back and get knocked out half a dozen times in a game. … Next time the good people make a roar about prize-fighting I’ll know what is their idea of a pleasant, easy, safe sport.

    In 1900, when New York legislators sought to repeal the law legalizing boxing, there was some debate. Upset that his fellow legislators were looking to do away with boxing, Assemblyman Tim Sullivan “handed back a hot one to the anti-boxing element” by introducing a measure intended to put an end to football. “From an array of statistics he is prepared to show that football is more brutal than boxing and is responsible for more casualties in the way of deaths, broken limbs and other injuries.” He was essentially calling attention to the legislators’ hypocrisy in supporting football but attacking boxing. Nevertheless, the government banned boxing while continuing the legality of football.

    The ironic inconsistency of the legal treatment between football and boxing was noted by the National Police Gazette as well:

    Although football is encouraged and upheld by the best classes of American society, and all attempts to even modify the rules have proven futile, it has been four times as fatal as boxing, a sport generally reprobated by the hysterical enthusiasts of the gridiron. In ten years forty-seven men have met death in all parts of the world as the result of engaging in boxing contests. That is less than an average of five per year. On the basis of fourteen men killed in football in America alone in one season, a very modest estimate, by the way, the total in ten years would be 140, as against forty-seven in boxing. That is conclusive evidence of the relative roughness as to the two branches of sport. There never has been so much boxing as in the past ten years…. There may be, as the football enthusiasts assert, deliberate intention to injure in the game of boxing, but the fatalities in football are four times as great. If football is a gentle game, injuries being entirely due to accident, it is the most unfortunate sport on the face of the globe.

    In the early 1900s, despite the fact that boxing was either illegal or being highly limited and regulated in most of the country, football was flourishing. Boxing enthusiasts could not understand the inconsistent treatment accorded the two sports. “Every sporting writer in the country has had his say about the injustice of the authorities in discriminating against boxing in favor of football, which is conceded to be more dangerous to life and limb and responsible for more injuries and fatalities than any other game in the category of sport.” The National Police Gazette said that the many fatalities and injuries resulting from football demonstrate that prize fighting, by comparison, is mere child’s play.

    In 1904 in Detroit, after Noah Brusso brutally knocked out Ben O’Grady, which required O’Grady’s hospitalization for several days, initially, Mayor William Maybury stoutly defended boxing.

    I think it is a very small matter for people to raise any very great objection to these friendly contests, when they will flock by the thousands to the football field, where surgeons and ambulances are in attendance, and where the players are dragged from the field with broken limbs and oftentimes injuries which prove fatal.

    Exacerbating the current of anti-boxing sentiment, on February 2 in Detroit, black world lightweight champion Joe Gans stopped Mike Ward in the 10th round. Apparently the police had told referee Tim Hurst to stop the bout, but he waited another ten to fifteen seconds before doing so.

    On February 3, 1904, Detroit Mayor Maybury did a total about-face and put a temporary halt to all boxing in the city.

    The number of boxing shows given in saloons has been steadily increasing, and, because of the youth of many contestants, has been regarded as a source of danger. This, with the O’Grady affair, Tim Hurst’s work in the tenth round on Tuesday night, and one or two other circumstances, caused the mayor to call a halt for the present.

    The police commissioner was ordered to suspend all boxing permits. The mayor said, “When the police say ‘Stop’ the referee should do it like that… I realize that it is a very popular sport, and that many of our best people enjoy it. But these affairs must be conducted right.” It was believed to be a temporary ban, and that boxing would be allowed to resume under proper restrictions.

    In 1905, former heavyweight champion John L. Sullivan said, “Boxing ain’t one half as bad nor as brutal as football…. There are a lot of milk and water guys who don’t know a thing about boxing, but who are knocking the game all the time.”

    These arguments still hold true today. Despite the fact that football statistically has more injuries and deaths for every participant, we have colleges and television wholeheartedly promoting it, while at the same time shunning boxing. For whatever reason, this illogical, irrational discrimination has continued to this day.

    Irrational historical bias, not logic, is behind the attacks on boxing and other combat sports. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, United States Department of Labor, only 6.4% of the deaths in athletic occupations from 1992 – 2002 were from combat sports. That means 93.6% of all deaths in athletic occupations were from sports other than boxing, kickboxing, wrestling, mixed martial arts, etc.

    We see auto racing televised all the time, and no one in the media calls for it to be abolished or shunned. Yet it accounts for 37.4% of the deaths. Swimming, diving, and boating accounted for 23.3% of the fatalities. Why isn’t anyone attacking swimming as a dangerous sport? Jockeys and rodeo folks – those that work with animals – accounted for 16% of all deaths. Compare these to 6.4% from boxing.

    Boxing even has a relatively low rate of death per 100,000 participants, at only 1.5 (one source says it’s actually only .7 for amateur boxing). Deaths are rare. According to USA Boxing, 1.5 out of every 100,000 fighters is killed in the ring, ranking the sport eighth on the death rate list, safer than sports as horse racing (128 per 100,000), sky diving (123), mountaineering (51) and college football (3), amongst others.
    College football has double the rate of deaths per 100,000 participants (3.0 vs. 1.5). That means you are twice as likely to die on the football field as in the ring. However, by comparison, about 128 jockeys will die per 100,000 participants, blowing boxing and football away in terms of risk. Consider that the next time you watch a horse race, or criticize combat sports. A jockey is 85 times more likely to die. Try checking out the injury and death statistics for women’s cheerleading sometime. According to HBO’s Real Sports, it is currently the most dangerous sport in America for women.

    Between January 1979 and December 2002 (23 years), only 13 U.S. male amateur boxers died (one source says it was only 8). That means it takes two years for one person to die (1.13 deaths every 2 years). From 1993 to 2005, we had one death in sanctioned women’s amateur boxing. That’s 1 death per 12 years or .166 deaths every 2 years.

    Now compare boxing with “regular” jobs. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, United States Department of Labor, in 2004, there were 5,703 fatal work injuries, or 4.1 deaths per 100,000 workers (up .1 from 2003 and 2002). As you can see, boxing has a lower death rate per 100,000 workers (1.5) than the national average for all jobs (4.1). That means you are 2.7 times more likely to die on a job other than boxing. Even airline pilots and flight engineers had a much higher incidence of death (92.4 per 100,000). 25 construction workers and 39 farm laborers die per 100,000. You are 16 and 26 times more likely to die in those respective professions than in the ring. Should we bar folks from earning a living in these professions?

    So why is boxing, which only accounted for 6.4% of total deaths in sport alone, always the first to get attacked? Certainly, logic has nothing to do with it.


    See
    Fatal Occupational Injuries to Athletes, 1992 – 2002, by Stephen M. Pegula, Bureau of Labor Statistics;
    http://www.bls.gov/opub/cwc/sh20040719ar01p1.htm

    Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries Summary, 2004
    http://www.bls.gov/news.release/cfoi.nr0.htm

    Death Under the Spotlight: The Manual Velazquez Boxing Fatality Collection, by Joseph R. Svinth, Journal of Combative Sport, Feb 2004
    http://ejmas.com/jcs/jcsart_svinth_a_0700.htm

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    Re: Top Ten Fighters Who Died In The Ring

    Quote Originally Posted by apollack View Post
    Historically, serious injuries or deaths have caused the police and legislators (and even sanctioning bodies and the press) to come down hard on boxing, even though they did not and do not do the same with other sports. This sport has been a big target with a bullseye on it from the beginning. Hence, it definitely does not help the sport to publicize injuries. Folks get killed and paralyzed in football twice as much as boxing, and yet boxers get crapped on by the press and politicians. I have several quotes from old-time fighters calling attention to this fact. Make no mistake about it, the knee-jerk anti-boxing reaction is built into the psyche of society and there is a long history of it. Boxing fans and writers must always be cognizant of that.
    this is the reason davey moore has of yet has not been inducted into the hall of fame IMO. people don't want to have to deal with it.

    like hap was saying about venues ...... the folks at dodger stadium dropped boxing like the plague after ramos-moore.

    something that legislators have to realize is that for many young men fighting is in their nature. were boxing banned it would be akin to alcohol prohibition. these young men would fight anyway in unsanctioned outlaw bouts where the dangers would be multiplied.

    the difference in the dangers of football or auto racing as opposed to boxing is that boxing is more obvious in its purpose which leads lawmakers to focus on it when something lousy happens. to outlaw it would really be a mistake.

    greg
    Last edited by gregbeyer; 04-12-2011 at 04:21 PM.

  16. #16
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    Re: Top Ten Fighters Who Died In The Ring

    It's funny how the pendulum swings back and forth on Ketchum and his actions after the tragedy. I just got done reading an article on Moore's death in a vintage Boxing & Wrestling Illustrated, and the photos showed a distraught Ketchum who (to paraphrase) "...never left the hospital or Moore's bedside".

    I still say the most-chilling thing about the Ramos-Moore tragedy was a) the sight of that jolting hit the back of his head/neck takes when Davey hits that bottom rope, and b) his in-ring interview in which no one has a clue as to what will shortly transpire. One almost wants to stop him from leaving the ring and going back to the dressing room where he lapsed into the fatal coma.

    Anyway, his non-induction into the BHOF is, at this point, scandalous.

    Regards,
    Kyoodle

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    Re: Top Ten Fighters Who Died In The Ring

    Quote Originally Posted by Kyoodle View Post

    Anyway, his non-induction into the BHOF is, at this point, scandalous.

    Regards,
    Kyoodle
    Personally, I no longer see the relevance of the IBHOF when the names of Sven Ottke, Naseem Hamed, Sammy Serrano, etc. are on the ballot to the exclusion of Davey Moore, Tony DeMarco, Gus Lesnevich and other worthy but forgotten fighters. It's seems obvious that the IBHOF goes out of it's way to ensure that the ballots include a lot of living people with greater emphasis on fighters from post 1985 to present.

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    Re: Top Ten Fighters Who Died In The Ring

    Dan: I couldn't agree with you more. I can recall the hue and cry when they indicted....I mean, inducted, Don King. Since then the very questionable decisions they've made have caused that one to pale in comparison. I've personally lobbied no less than a dozen voters to try and get Jeff Smith in there, but now I couldn't care any less.

    If and when the Boxing Hall of Champions is opened in Las Vegas by Steve Lott and his group, perhaps a lot of these injustices will be remediated.

    Regards,
    Kyoodle

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    Re: Top Ten Fighters Who Died In The Ring

    andy bowen

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