Home News Current Champs WAIL! Encyclopedia
The Cyber Boxing Zone Message Board
+ Reply to Thread
Page 4 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast
Results 91 to 120 of 161

Thread: Pac vs. Mosley

  1. #91
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    347
    vCash
    500

    Re: Mosley Pac - May 7th

    Quote Originally Posted by Wladimir Klitschko Sucks
    i don't understand the moaning about this fight, everyone is calling for Paq to fight JMM but i didn't here anyone here call for Shane vs. JMM -does anyone thing JMM would beat Shane? Shane is a MExican Assasin just like Paq so it makes sense that these two see who the REal Mexican Assassin,

    WKS
    Shane vs. JMM would have the same outcome as Shane vs. Paq. I've always been a fan of Shane, and just don't wish him to hang on, and take unnecessary punishment that would be detrimental to his health.

  2. #92
    Banned
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    I'm the one in the middle.
    Posts
    9,487
    vCash
    500

    Everyone

    who is calling for Manny JMM, is calling for it to be at 140.

    147, Manny has a clear advantage.

    Same way Floyd did.

    At 140, I still take Manny and decisively so.

    But it is a far more competitive matchup than if it takes place at 147.

    Manny can make 140. Doesn't HAVE to. Isn't OBLIGATED to.

    But he can.

    Hawk

  3. #93
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    2,503
    vCash
    500

    Re: Mosley Pac - May 7th

    well hawk you certainly can and do have a right to voice your dissatisfaction with team pac ..... mosely wants it however and will probably fade into history once its over.

    this is like the should holmes have fought ali question everybody had a different opinion there too ..... but after 4 pages of posts on this one ..... got it !

    greg

  4. #94
    Banned
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    I'm the one in the middle.
    Posts
    9,487
    vCash
    500

    We're Cool Greg

    Hey, had there been a CBZ back in 1980, I am sure we could have debated the merits of Holmes Ali as well!

    Only thing different about that was Ali was STILL considered THE Heavyweight Champ at the time and while coming out of retirement, was coming off of a win in which he won the Heavyweight title for the 3rd time.

    Holmes to his credit, did NOT want Ali, but pretty much HAD to take that fight.

    THere was indeed clamour for it to happen.

    THere is NONE for Manny Mosley though.

    Hawk

  5. #95
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    900
    vCash
    500

    Re: Mosley Pac - May 7th

    There is a clamour of one on here,

    more of a squeek as clamours go though.....

  6. #96
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    2,503
    vCash
    500

    Re: Mosley Pac - May 7th

    Quote Originally Posted by TDKO
    There is a clamour of one on here,

    more of a squeek as clamours go though.....
    what does that mean? explain further.

    greg

  7. #97
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    900
    vCash
    500

    Re: Mosley Pac - May 7th

    Just being facetious Greg,

    with the poster on here

    who seemingly condones this fight and feels Shane will "Knock Pac the F*ck out"

    That's all....

  8. #98
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    348
    vCash
    500

    Re: Mosley Pac - May 7th

    Shane Mosely is a totally shot, washed up derelict of a fighter. A shell of his former self. He has no shot against almost anybody. Anyone who buys this fight really has nothing better to do.

    It's an insult to any real boxing fan's intelligence that not only are they selling it as a PPV but are calling it a world championship?

    In what universe is today's v.too many versions of Shane, a legit contender?

    EMF

  9. #99
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    1,033
    vCash
    500

    Re: Mosley Pac - May 7th

    How come this thread is in the archived section?

  10. #100
    MANAGING EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    In an undisclosed bunker deep in the weird, wild, woods of the Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    11,450
    vCash
    500

    Pac vs. Mosley

    Pac-Mosely - Much Ado over Nothing…but Money: the State of Big Fights in America
    By Alec Kohut/Max Boxing

    Get ready, sports fans; the hype machine is all warmed up and this week we will all be treated to endless commercials, infomercials, and fight replays to convince us of the monumental importance of Saturday’s big event between Manny Pacquiao and Shane Mosley.

    I won’t provide a preview of next Saturday’s big event between Pacquiao and Mosley, filled with all the cute quotes coming from trainers Freddie Roach and Naazim Richardson and I definitely won’t attempt to examine the scenarios in which Mosley can shock the world with an upset.

    What I will do, however, is remind us all of what has changed since the first announcement months ago that boxing’s brightest and most charismatic star would face the aging and once-great Mosley.



    Nothing. Absolutely nothing. In fact, this whole week will feature much ado over nothing.

    Mosley is still just 2-2-1 in the past four years and coming off two dreadful performances in 2010. Pacquiao is still younger, with faster feet and faster hands. Nothing’s changed.

    What have all the upsets over the past two months changed in regard to Mosley’s chances in Saturday’s fight? Nothing.

    What can Shane Mosley do to change the fact he turns 40 later this year? Nothing.

    The fight looks just as bad now as it did when it was announced, despite the fanfare and insane notion that this fight is somehow a step to bringing boxing to network television.

    However, I, like so many fight fans, will hold my nose at this steaming pile of nothing and fork out $55 in the hope that the undercard bouts carry the day, and at 1 AM Sunday, we won’t feel cheated because our date deceived us with online photos of a younger, skinnier person from ten years past.

    That’s exactly what we’ll get this week, photos and highlights of a younger and better Shane Mosley. We won’t see rounds 3-12 against Floyd Mayweather and we won’t be shown the 12 ugly, boring rounds with Sergio Mora. We’ll see the pretty, new-and-improved, “in the best shape of my life” Shane Mosley.

    But all the talk of a great training camp and how their styles make for a great fight and the slick “Fight Camp 360” infomercials will mean nothing when the bell rings at the MGM Grand next Saturday. The reporters desperately trying explain why this is a good fight, sounding as pathetic as university presidents do when justifying the BCS, will make just as significant an impact.

    The fight is what it is, a tune-up or stay-busy fight to make some money while not risking a potential huge payday against Floyd Mayweather. While there’s nothing wrong or new about tune-up or stay-busy fights, over the past two decades, we have seen a dramatic change in how these fights are made, marketed, and sold. We’ve reached the point that it’s a big deal for the sport’s biggest names to just merely fight, regardless of the quality of opposition. Today, just appearing on the stage is enough.

    But that doesn’t mean the opponent is irrelevant? No. Opponents now are chosen solely on financial considerations. Now we all know that money has always been the driving force when making fights. Pay-per-view and closed circuit fights have been around since Sugar Ray Robinson/Randy Turpin II but in previous decades, the correlation between a great fight and a big-money fight was much closer.

    This brings us to Mosley, who remains one of the few fighters left with any name recognition with the average American sports fan. For the past two decades, boxing has so successfully turned its back on the average American sports fan, there are now just a handful of boxers left that the casual sports fan has even heard of. Mosley earned this fight by merely hanging around longer than other fighters of renown.

    Perhaps the major turning point was when the horrendous Mike Tyson-Peter McNeely sideshow sold 1.5 million PPV buys and promoters realized that it safer and more profitable to create stars rather than great fights. If there was a big-money fight that never even had the patina of a possibility of a good fight, that was it.

    Now what remains are two geese that can lay golden eggs; one is 34, has been inactive for a year and is facing legal issues. The other is 32 and has made it fairly clear that his number of remaining fights can be counted on one hand.

    How far has the gap between big-money fights and great fights become? The next potential big-money PPV fight being discussed is Mayweather vs. Paul Spadafora. No, that is not a joke. As my friend and colleague Steve Kim would say. “Mike Tyson, Oscar De La Hoya and Ray Leonard ain’t walking through that door.”

    I will not make the ridiculous claim that boxing is dead in America or even close but nor it is even close to being a mainstream sport any longer. If you need proof of this, try to talk to an average sports fan about boxing; beyond Mayweather and Pacquiao, see how far that conversation goes.

    Things will change and most likely change soon; no longer does the boxing fan need to decide between paying $50 and not seeing a fight. Technology has brought us “streaming” of fights and that technology will only get better and easier for people to access. The boxing establishment will have to adjust to it, just as the music industry was forced to.

    When all is said is said and done, it will most likely be technology and Moore’s law that ironically brings our wonderful sport back to its traditional roots and back to the regular American sports fan. To this observer, it can’t happen soon enough.

  11. #101
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    1,783
    vCash
    500

    Re: Pac-Mosely - Much Ado over Nothing…but Money: the State of Big Fights in America

    Shane doesnt deserve this fight based on anything Ive seen lately. Id like to see manny with vic ortiz.

  12. #102
    MANAGING EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    In an undisclosed bunker deep in the weird, wild, woods of the Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    11,450
    vCash
    500

    CompuBox Pre-Fight Analysis: Pacquiao vs. Mosley

    CompuBox Pre-Fight Analysis: Pacquiao vs. Mosley
    By CompuBox

    Two years ago Manny Pacquiao vs. Shane Mosley was the next best thing to Pacquiao-Mayweather. Now, in the eyes of most experts at least, it's a glorified mismatch pitting the pound-for-pound king against a 39-year-old who hasn't won in more than two years. Pacquiao is nearly a 7-1 favorite.

    But in a year filled with upsets -- Rubio over Lemieux Ishida over Kirkland being just the most recent -- the "experts" have been caught flat-footed time and again. Will history repeat itself during Saturday's megamatch? Their respective CompuBox histories offer these clues:

    A Matter of Styles?: Some blame Mosley's erosion on age, both in terms of chronology and ring wear While being 39 is not ideal for a world-class fighter, part of Mosley's slide must be attributed to Sergio Mora's herky-jerky style and Floyd Mayweather's technical brilliance. "The Latin Snake" and "Money" have made careers out of making others look bad and Mosley was just another victim.

    Despite the draw verdict, Mosley was statistically superior. He out-landed Mora 161-93 overall, 37-27 in jabs and -- most importantly -- 124-66 in power shots. He landed 31 percent (overall) and 37.5 percent (power) while holding the lanky Mora to just 18.3 percent and 23.1 percent respectively. That speaks well of Mosley's reflexes, for he was defensively sharp against a quick-handed opponent. As for the judging, many rounds were tough to score due to both men fighting in spurts.

    The Mayweather loss was an artistic and numerical blowout. Although their outputs were similar (477-452 Mayweather), "Money" was brutally efficient as he landed 43.6 percent overall to Mosley's 20.4; 40.5 percent of his jabs to Mosley's 16.3 and 46.1 percent of his power shots to Mosley's 27.2. The raw connect totals were just as ugly as Mayweather led 208-92 (overall), 85-46 (jabs) and 123-46 (power).

    Meanwhile, Mosley prospered against aggressors. Against Antonio Margarito, Ricardo Mayorga and Fernando Vargas (twice) Mosley averaged 16.5 connects per round to his foes' 10.7 and led 34.8 percent to 22.2 (overall), 22.0 to 15.2 (jabs) and 47.1 to 25.1 (power). That's far better than the deficits of 26.0-30.6 (overall), 17.5-25.9 (jabs) and 34.0-34.2 (power) he suffered against Mayweather and Mora.

    Therefore, it will be better for Pacquiao to mix plenty of skills and movement with his natural aggression, for Mayweather and Mora's tricks limited Mosley to 40.6 punches per round. Against the aggressors Mosley threw 47.4, still under the welterweight average of 58.2.

    Pacquiao's Finishing Kick: Since rising to welterweight -- and beyond -- Pacquiao's fights have followed a pattern: Competitive starts followed by phenomenally lengthy bursts that break bodies and wills.

    The first three rounds against Cotto were suspenseful but from round four onward Pacquiao meted out a frightful beating. In those rounds Pacquiao landed 43.2 percent overall (248 of 574) to Cotto's 29.2 percent (116 of 397), including 47.7 percent of his power shots (205 of 430) to Cotto's 29.9 percent (58 of 194). The discouraging effect of Pacquiao's attack was graphically demonstrated by this stat: From round five onward, Cotto never managed to reach double-digits in power connects while Pacquiao averaged 22.8.

    Against Clottey, the raw damage was limited due to the Ghanaian's shell defense but the results were no less lopsided. Over the final five Pacquiao averaged 110.8 punches per round -- nearly double the welterweight average -- while the bedazzled Clottey threw just 34.8. That allowed Pacquiao to amass gaps of 124-44 in overall connects and 120-40 in landed power shots.

    The most gruesome battering took place against Margarito, perhaps because "The Tijuana Tornado" continued to defiantly fire back. In rounds four through 12, Pacquiao unloaded 94.4 punches per round to Margarito's 69.5 and built leads of 404-174 (total connects) and 350-111 (power connects). The 10th and 11th were grotesque as Pacquiao went 64 of 116 (overall) and 55 of 101 (power) to Margarito's 13 of 64 and 9 of 57. Pacquiao showed mercy by slowing to a mere 34 of 79 overall (43 percent) and 27 of 51 in power shots (53 percent) in the 12th while Margarito struggled to 10 of 58 (17 percent) and 3 of 11 (38 percent).

    To give himself the best chance Mosley must slow Pacquiao's attack, which averaged 85.6 punches per round and a 47 percent power connect rate since rising to welterweight. If he doesn't, it will be a long, painful night.

    Prediction: Mosley will be competitive early, but Pacquiao's speed will be too much for this version of "Sugar Shane." Pacquiao will pull away to a lopsided unanimous decision.

  13. #103
    MANAGING EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    In an undisclosed bunker deep in the weird, wild, woods of the Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    11,450
    vCash
    500

    Re: CompuBox Pre-Fight Analysis: Pacquiao vs. Mosley


  14. #104
    MANAGING EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    In an undisclosed bunker deep in the weird, wild, woods of the Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    11,450
    vCash
    500

    Re: CompuBox Pre-Fight Analysis: Pacquiao vs. Mosley

    WEIGHING IN: TRAINERS BREAK DOWN PACQUIAO-MOSLEY
    by Michael Rosenthal/The Ring

    Three notable trainers pick the winner of the big fight (or fights) of the weekend in this RingTV.com feature. This week: Abel Sanchez, Rudy Hernandez and Joe Goossen break down the Manny Pacquiao-Shane Mosley fight on Saturday at the MGM Grand in Las Vegas.



    ABEL SANCHEZ

    “I think it’s going to be difficult for Shane. His best chance, for me, is in the first four rounds. After that, Manny will cruise, just box him, actually hit him at will, I think. I think this fight is too late for Shane. Unfortunately father time takes its toll on everybody. I’m not going by past performances. I just think it’s getting to the point now where he doesn’t pull the trigger like he used to. Manny is, I would say, toward the end of his prime. I think he’ll start to decline in two, three years but now he’s still in his prime. From what I hear, camp is going well. He won’t have problems with weight. So he’ll be strong. He throws a lot of punches and it’s difficult to get away from that. Why is Shane’s best chance early? Because that’s when Manny is cold. Once he gets on a roll, once he gets his combinations going, his timing down, his distance right, once he figures Shane out, that’ll be it.

    "Manny is a smart fighter; he’ll figure out what to do. And I don’t think Shane is that big of a puncher. He throws sharp, quick combinations but not big, big punches. He needs eight, nine punches to land before he has you down or hurt. He has a chance. If he gets the opportunity, if Manny gives him the opportunity, anything can happen. Manny would have to stand still like Margarito, though. And I don’t think he’ll do that. I think Shane’s only chance is if Manny falls asleep, if he loses focus. That doesn’t seem likely. I think it’ll be a four- or five-point edge for Manny. I don’t think Shane will embarrass himself like Margarito (did against Pacquiao). I don’t think Manny will stop him. Shane is too smart of a fighter. I don’t think he’ll expose himself enough to get knocked out. I think the volume of punches will take a toll, though."

    Prediction: Pacquiao by decision



    RUDY HERNANDEZ

    "A couple of years ago, before Shane fought (Antonio) Margarito, I think Shane probably would’ve been at his most-dangerous for Manny Pacquiao. A couple of years have gone by, though. Shane is no longer the fighter he used to be. His reflexes have slowed down a little bit. That’s a killer for him. It’s customary for Manny Pacquaio to be moving in and out, side to side … that footwork is what is going to determine the outcome of the fight. I just see him being too quick for Shane to handle now. When he fought Floyd (Mayweather Jr.), it was like he was a second too slow. That just comes with age. It’s not something you can work on. Yeah, he’s a hell of an athlete. This is a whole different ballgame, though. I think the fight is going to be one sided. I don’t know if he can stop him. Mosley has the heart of a lion and he’s far from being a quitter. He’ll be there for the whole fight. He’ll just be hoping that he lands a lucky punch and is able to drop him. I just don’t see that happening. I don’t think it’s a close fight. Like I said, a few years ago, it might’ve been a different story. Time waits for no one, though. It happens to all the greats at one time or another."

    Prediction: Pacquiao by decision



    JOE GOOSSEN

    "To bet against Pacquiao would be the worst idea in the world if you look at the general consensus out there. Pacquiao is anywhere from a 6-1 to a 9-1 favorite. To me, the question isn’t who’s going to win; it’s more how well can Mosley do? Is there a chance he can upset Pacquiao? Mosley is the type of guy who is always in great shape. He has a young mind in his approach to the sport. He’s pushing 40 but has a youthful vibe about him. That can fall apart at any moment when you’re his age, when you’re in there with a guy as confusing as Pacquiao can be. I think there are a lot of intangibles. If Mosley is spirited, if he has a youthful bounce, he can make it very interesting, very competitive. Pacquiao throws punches from the southpaw position, rapid fire, the punches keep coming and they come quickly and very hard. To deal with that, you have to have head movement.

    "Shane can move his head well, which will give him a chance to nullify some of the rapid-fire combinations. And he’s good at knocking punches down. Again, though, how fast is he going to be? Because Pacquiao is very quick. He might be slowing down a hair but he’s still on top of his game. I agree that Pacquiao should be favored but I think the spread (6-1 to 9-1) is a little off. I believe it’ll be much more competitive than the experts are expecting. I’m not disagreeing with the opinion of the experts if a certain scenario plays out. Again, if Shane’s legs have a bounce to them, if he’s able to step forward and backward quickly, if he has good head movement, he’s in the fight all the way. If he’s flatfooted, following Pacquiao trying to catch him and not being able to put on hard pressure, it could be a long night for him."

    Prediction: No formal prediction

  15. #105
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    773
    vCash
    500

    Re: CompuBox Pre-Fight Analysis: Pacquiao vs. Mosley

    Quote Originally Posted by GorDoom View Post
    Where can we place a bet with these gentlemen?

    Seriously, Mosley wins maybe 2 rounds, one even. Good chance he kisses canvas for a short count. Pacquiao UD12.

  16. #106
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Louisville,ky
    Posts
    1,556
    vCash
    500

    Re: CompuBox Pre-Fight Analysis: Pacquiao vs. Mosley

    I think Mosley is going to do a lot better than people think.

  17. #107
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    1,034
    vCash
    500

    Re: CompuBox Pre-Fight Analysis: Pacquiao vs. Mosley

    I think the irony here is that while some people may have heavily favoured Pac in his last few fights and also favour Pac in his upcoming fight with Mosley, those same people still don't exactly appreciate what Pac brings to the table in order for him to win these fights.

    Of course it's hard to argue against results and by this stage most people are choosing not to. Pac has simply got the job done. However, the early rd complexion and obstacles contained in some of Pac's fights is being lost.

    Let's remember, only some two and half years back, v DLH, it was Manny who was apparently on the wrong end of mis-match. Then there was the rolling of Hatton, Cotto, Clottey and Margarito. Now, just two and half years later, Manny's being called out for taking it too "soft" fighting Mosely.

    This guy (Pac) trains and fights at 150%. His preparation, focus, discipline and heart are off the charts. He has already hit peak, no question and he can only deterioriate from this point.

    If you factor all the attributes that Pac hones and brings into near perfect alignment, these fights are never "easy" even if Pac ultimately wins by a wide margin. Pac can never take it "easy" otherwise it would be he, the perennially smaller man, who would get eaten up. Quite literally, Pac's best defense his frenetic offense.

    Can we reasonably expect Pacquiao to continue performing at the level he has upheld in the past few years? Really, in performance, he has left little to be desired, imo.

    Now Manny can be drawn into engaging IF tagged and hurt. This occurred in just his last fight v Margarito. Seriously, if Mosely had momentarily wounded Pac and forced Manny to fight off the ropes (as was the case v Margarito) this version of Shane still may have the potential to take far better advantage than Margarito did.

    If this most important thing about this fight is for Manny to do better than Floyd did v Shane, then Pacquiao may be drawn into a performance that isn't necessarily in his best interests.

    With the odds so heavily in favour of Pac and many citing this fight as a mis-match, perhaps the only way Pac can really impress in relative terms is by stopping/knocking out Mosely.

    Knowing this, Pac and his team may've strategised themselves for the express pursuit of such a result - perhaps that very strategy may provide Mosley with greater window of chance than most have afforded him.

    In my mind, Mosley's power and counter punching ability has to be well respected for at least the first quarter of the fight though Shane's flush, early rd tagging of PBF might've told us just as much about PBF's deteriorations as did about whatever else Mosely has left. I would think that Pac's best strategy would be to accent himself to the body before truly unleashing to the head - however, I have detected Pac's reaching to the body as leaving himself somewhat open to potential counters from above and beneath.

    I think there is merit to a perhaps a more competitive style mish mash in this fight than we saw in PBF v Mosley. I expect there to be an early round "hump" over which Pac will have to amp up his activity and intensity in order to take this fight by the scruff of the neck and see the fight out in resounding fashion.

  18. #108
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    2,295
    vCash
    500

    Re: Pac-Mosely - Much Ado over Nothing…but Money: the State of Big Fights in America

    Names make money, regardless of current boxing ability. Mosley is an old 39. He no longer has the zip, speed, and punch volume that he once had. Every great fighter has one good fight left in them, but I think Mosley already had that fight two years ago against Margarito. He looked pathetic against Mayweather, and old against Mora. He can no longer pull the trigger often enough to beat a young hungry passionate fighter like Pacquaio. The difference in speed and volume, as well as zip and footwork is going to make Mosley look even older. Margarito was a slow plod forward guy. Pacquiao is fast, with combos, and with footwork, guard, and head movement. When you have to say that Mosley has a puncher's chance, what you are saying is that sure he can win if he lands one big bomb, but other than that he should get his ass handed to him. Should be a one-sided beatdown. Even in the hype shows Mosley showed me just how old he is. He is a shell. Even his speech seems slowed. Why would everyone get excited about this fight when Shane showed nothing but one punch in 12 rounds against Floyd, and looked past-it against Mora, a guy without Pac's speed, power, and volume? This fight again shows the power of the press, media, and promoters to hype anything to the exclusion of reality. Of course it is boxing and anything can happen, but I just don't see why I should pay $55 for the alleged P4P to fight a guy who is 39 years old, who is 0-1-1 in his last two bouts over the past year.

  19. #109
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    385
    vCash
    500

    Re: Pac-Mosely - Much Ado over Nothing…but Money: the State of Big Fights in America

    No matter who wins, I'll bet Shane surprises a lot of people tonight.

  20. #110
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    773
    vCash
    500

    Re: CompuBox Pre-Fight Analysis: Pacquiao vs. Mosley

    "I think there is merit to a perhaps a more competitive style mish mash in this fight than we saw in PBF v Mosley. I expect there to be an early round "hump" over which Pac will have to amp up his activity and intensity in order to take this fight by the scruff of the neck and see the fight out in resounding fashion."

    Spot on, PD99. There's no reason for Pacquiao to rush in for an early stoppage. After 5 Mosley could have a few lower tempo rounds in his column but the fight will have begun to shift. Against Mayweather Shane was even after 2.

  21. #111
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    773
    vCash
    500

    Re: Pac-Mosely - Much Ado over Nothing…but Money: the State of Big Fights in America

    For those thinking of drinking the Kool-Aid (like me), there is a better than expected undercard.

    By Marty Mulcahey


    I am surprised at the unexpectedly positive buzz surrounding tonight’s Manny Pacquiao-Shane Mosley pay-per-view. The momentum for it has slowly built to a crescendo, which should produce a considerable amount of last-minute impulse purchases, although many potential buyers will be put off by the $65 cost (for high-definition) as I was when I pre-ordered the event. Considering this is not a marquee bout, no matter the hyperbole, I was taken aback by the price. All credit to Top Rank, Showtime’s “Fight Camp 360” series and CBS; the trio has managed to create doubt about the outcome and manufactured an “event” out of something boxing fans viewed with ambivalence when it was first announced.

    At the MGM Grand, Las Vegas, NV
    (PPV) Manny Pacquiao (52-3-2) vs. Shane Mosley (46-6-1)
    (The Ring magazine #1 pound-for-pound/welterweight vs. #3 welterweight)
    (WBO welterweight belt)
    (PPV) Wilfredo Vazquez Jr. (20-0-1) vs. Jorge Arce (56-6-2)
    (The Ring magazine #9 junior featherweight vs. unranked)
    (WBO junior featherweight belt)
    (PPV) Kelly Pavlik (36-2) vs. Alfonso Lopez (21-0)
    (PPV) Mike Alvarado (29-0) vs. Ray Narh (25-1)

    Ray Narh - 32-year-old Ghanaian has made noise regionally, first in Ghana and then headlining Pittsburgh cards, impressing audiences with silky-smooth boxing moves. Narh last fought on ESPN2, two months ago, dominating a shot Freddie Norwood over ten rounds. A member of Ghana’s 2000 Olympic team, Narh lost in the second round to future pro champion Andriy Kotelnik. Grew up in a boxing environment and achieved national fame as the first Ghanaian boxer to win a gold medal at the Commonwealth Games since Azumah Nelson 20 years earlier. As a pro, Narh was fast-tracked because of amateur successes; his fourth bout was scheduled for 12 rounds, which he won in ten. Seven of his first nine fights were in Ghana; the other two took place in England, after which Narh moved and only fought in America. Narh is now an American citizen but remains proud of his heritage and is involved in Ghanaian charities as part of his religious convictions. In the ring, Narh bedevils foes with picture book boxing, his form and balance always correct and rarely showing a flaw in motion. Has very good speed and a solid jab (though the velocity has waned with age) that pave the way for precise punches. Reminds me of Paul Spadafora, as both stay in the pocket to give them the option to lead or counterpunch. When too confident, Narh gets right hand-happy, sometimes leading with it and falling inward behind the punch. Narh was on ESPN back in 2006, scoring his most impressive victory, outfoxing Steve Quinonez and often landing a sly uppercut. A short time later, sat out two years to let his contract run out in a promotional squabble. Has lost one fight, on short notice in his 11th pro bout, when Narh was caught cold and annihilated in one round by one-time prospect Almazbek “Kid Diamond” Raiymkulov. Narh’s defense is solid, with both hands held high and backed by side-to-side movement of the head behind the gloves. Maintains good distance and will throw a hard jab as a stopping defensive punch instead of retreating. Enters on a hot streak, 12 kayos in 15 wins, and full of confidence. However, Narh has delusions of grandeur that would make Charlie Sheen blush. “If I ever had a chance to fight [Manny] Pacquiao, I would stop him. I’m telling you; I know how to beat him. I’m ready to showcase myself.”



    Mike Alvarado - Coloradoan is one of the few legitimate prospects to come out of the Midwest in recent years, registering a 72% kayo ratio and stopping 11 of his last 13 opponents. Despite that statistic, Alvarado is a boxer first, using superior balance and infighting techniques he complements with skills learned competing in national high school wrestling tournaments. Started boxing at age 20 and fashioned a 36-5 amateur record, splitting two fights with Andre Dirrell, but never won a major national competition. Despite the initial impression I had of Alvarado, he falls outside the category of boxer who does everything well without excelling in a particular area. He is an excellent stalker, closing distances and filling space with a punch or his forward momentum. Looked great dismantling former champion Cesar Bazan in 2008, displaying a formidable jab before dropping Bazan with a right hook. Alvarado’s kayo of Emmanuel Clottey was worthy of “Knockout of the Year” consideration (Clottey dropped as if falling through a trapdoor) and he puts in solid bodywork to set up attrition stoppages, if the brilliant one does not arrive. Alvarado has slowly won me over, as I did not see him as world-class or even a top ten boxer at first. Perhaps because his hand speed and power are not in an elite class and he generally scores tactical stoppages instead of highlight reel hooks. Held his own in sparring sessions against a smaller Yuriorkis Gamboa, so his timing, if not speed, is excellent. Alvarado is a Fernando Vargas-type, making up for a lack of physical skills with intelligent movement and accuracy. Can hurt opponents with either hand and does not show stamina problems, going ten rounds with relative ease. Alvarado had a bicep injury last year, which hampered him and limited Alvarado to two bouts in all of 2010. Leaves no room for excuses, telling reporter Bill Green, “I trained for six full weeks. My health is 100%. The timing is perfect. I’m mentally and physically prepared.” By all accounts, Alvarado has turned his personal life around, which caused him to miss out on high-profile bouts and serve a six-month prison sentence. Will get a title push this year and would already have had the biggest test of his career if he were not injured (an elbow injury that is said to be 100% healed) in preparations for a Paul Malignaggi fight. At age 30, with seven years of pro work behind him, the stage is set for Alvarado to rise or fall.

    Verdict - A good match-up of divergent styles, where a credible case can be made for either man winning. This is why I am picking the man with more intangibles and that is the younger and harder hitting Alvarado. In a close fight, a knockdown can be the difference and I think Alvarado will score a late knockdown to seal a close victory. Narh has the feet to evade Alvarado early but the physicality of Alvarado builds up and slows Narh down to where Alvarado can take advantage after the fifth round. Alvarado said he wants to work body early and establish his superior physical strength. I take him at his word and if this were a ten-rounder, I might lean toward Narh. Alvarado sweeps the last six rounds, on aggression and forward momentum, to win by three points.

    Alfonso Lopez - The least recognizable boxer on this card but the quietly confident Texan is an all-around athlete with a tricky style. Lopez counts two Texas Golden Gloves and a runner-up medal at the US Nationals among his amateur achievements and did that in less than 40 amateur bouts. Did not start boxing until age 20, winning the Houston Golden Gloves after only three amateur bouts. As a pro, Lopez sports an undefeated record with the self-assurance it brings and won five of his last seven bouts by knockout. Boasts an impressive 76% kayo percentage but relies on an accumulation of punches to stop foes. Lopez is a well-rounded athlete, graduating from and playing linebacker at Sam Houston State, and his style is predicated on that nimbleness. It looks like Lopez tries to emulate Sergio Martinez, utilizing quick spurts and sharp angles to land punches. At six-feet tall with a 75-inch reach, Lopez is a good physical specimen. This is a 168-pound bout but Lopez is a natural light heavyweight who only fought at super middle three times. The Texan almost always throws in two and three-punch combinations, moving well behind his punches to set up the next blow. A negative is that Lopez throws combinations while standing too erect and his hands are at chest level. Does keep his chin down and Lopez has good feet and balance allowing him to throw a good punch while backing up. Looks as comfortable on the outside as inside but all the footage I viewed was against inferior competition that allowed Lopez to shine. Lopez can be a slow starter but in his last fight, he showed grit overcoming an injured right hand. Spars against the likes of former title challenger Chris Henry, prospect Marcus Johnson and upset specialist Bryan Vera. In 2009, Lopez upped his level of competition significantly but has still not defeated anyone of top 25 quality. This fight represents the shot at the big time Lopez has clamored for but is it too big a leap in competition?

    Kelly Pavlik -Former champion enters this fight on the heels of the biggest battle of his life, sober and free of alcohol since November of last year. Pavlik’s emerging reputation as the next great middleweight was ruined when he was outpointed by the last great middleweight in Bernard Hopkins. Before that loss, Pavlik built himself up the hard way, twice besting Jermain Taylor and eliminating a solid lineup of prospects and contenders, en route to a title shot. Pavlik’s most recent bloody loss, a gutsy setback to Sergio Martinez, is forgivable, given Martinez’s rise to pound-for-pound elite. At 6’2½ ”, he remains a tall super-middleweight but I would not characterize Pavlik as big since he lacks bulk and his legs are skinnier than most kitchen tables. The 29-year-old is a product build on the basics learned in the amateurs, where Pavlik had an 89-9 record, winning three national competitions between 1998 and 1999. Uses a long and lean frame to jab and pick holes in opponents with precise punches before moving in to finish off confused foes with powerful hooks and straight right hands. Is a smarter fighter than given credit for, especially in the wake of the Hopkins loss. Pavlik takes his time to break down the opposition, getting a feel for the tendencies and range needed to score, while continuing to lead instead of countering. Is not a bad counterpuncher either, doing well against speedier Taylor and Martinez, but his footwork is more suited to coming at an opponent. Does need some forward momentum to get the most out of his lean frame. Looked frustrated and lethargic against Bernard Hopkins but his performance was overly maligned against Martinez where he battled a bad cut as well. Pavlik has been hurt in a couple fights but always from punches he did not see and seems to have an otherwise sound chin. Sometimes carries his hands too high on defense, leaving room for shots under the elbow and blocking his sight of looping blows. If allowed to maintain space, Pavlik dictates and overwhelms opponents. Has offensive mindset of a finisher and when one of his punches breaks through, Pavlik rushes to finish. This fight will tell us whether the high-profile losses were because of the talented opposition or if Pavlik is rapidly fading.

    Verdict - This is a tougher fight than many think, even though Lopez is not as good as his 21-0 record indicates. Lopez has a bit of Sergio Martinez about him, throwing a lot of punches from sharp angles, but without the menace or swiftness. The problem is that Lopez is skipping a level of progression, going up against the world-class experience of Pavlik without having faced a more flawed or aged former champion first. Pavlik will use his length and experience to time and catch Lopez after a couple rounds and force Lopez to slow down by using a halting jab. Pavlik’s stiff right hand will stop Lopez’s forward momentum and I am not sure he can fight going backwards. I can even see a well-timed knockdown for Pavlik and a quick follow-up to stop an opponent who has never faced such problems. Much of this depends on Pavlik’s frame of mind. This is why if there is an upset to be had on this card, this is the fight to play.

    Jorge Arce - One of my favorite fighters of the past decade, Arce brings an enthusiasm and joy to the game that cannot be faked. One of the few boxers I first witnessed in a loss, via kayo to Michael Carbajal back in 1999, whom I was so impressed and attracted to that I made a note to myself not to miss his next fight. As tough and gritty a fighter as you want to witness, his passionate offensive style has made Arce a fan favorite on both sides of the border. With age, the little Mexican is becoming more reliant on one punch as he realizes his speed and work rate are declining. Now, Arce uses guile to pick spots in a round to impress the judges. Received a lot of punishment in bouts against Vic Darchinyan and Simphiwe Nongqayi but seemingly found new life beating Angky Angkota, Martin Castillo, and Lorenzo Parra last year. Were setbacks to Darchinyan and Cristian Mijares a case of losing to great fighters or has Arce has lost his edge and a step at age 31? Remember, Arce turned pro at age 16 (after a 37-3 amateur career) and has been in many tough fights. To his credit, Arce looked in great shape physically against Parra and claims to be fitter not having to make the bantamweight limit. A 67% kayo ratio is for real; stoppages have come against good opposition and are built upon a foundation of quality body work and constant pressure. Remains an offensive force with every punch still available to him, only Arce’s speed has slipped a notch. Still capable of throwing combinations in spurts but seems to be lucidly keeping reserves of stamina. Arce averages three to four fights a year; he fought five months ago and logged 357 quality rounds. A consistent pressure fighter, aside from the recent loss to hot-and-cold Nongqayi, Arce has not been defeated in a fight he was favored to win. Is only an inch taller than Vazquez and has gradually gotten used to fighting naturally larger men. To win, Arce must use his ring intellect to set traps against a still inexperienced champion.

    Wilfredo Vazquez Jr. - Enters this fight off a career-best win over experienced battler Ivan Hernandez, which elevated Vazquez’s image and marketability considerably in Puerto Rico. Now, the son of borderline Hall-of-Famer Wilfredo Vazquez is using that momentum for a fight which could entice Showtime and HBO to feature him regularly, especially given his bloodline, and the compelling nature of why he chose to box. The 26-year-old did not start boxing until age 21 and is remarkably composed in the ring considering he never had an amateur bout. Obviously a quick study, he’s stopped 17 of 20 victims in a five-year career. Appeared a lot on Telemundo fight cards, displaying considerable hand speed and a puncher/boxer attitude under his father’s invaluable guidance. “WV2” (a catchy and unique acronym) is an attraction as well, drawing sellout crowds in southern Florida with his fast fists and charisma. Despite having just over 100 rounds of pro experience, has a good feel for the ring, not smothering punches or throwing combinations for the sake of throwing a punch. Goes to the body well and tried out different styles on lesser boxers. Vazquez moves from slugger to counterpuncher as he sees fit, or according to an opponent’s skills, but not as fluently in the course of a fight. May lack muscle-memory reflexes but his eyes and quick reaction time have served Vazquez well on defense. I’ve seen him hurt twice but Vazquez displayed mental maturity staring down veteran Adolfo Landeros after getting rocked. Has good stamina and late power, stopping hard-hitting Mexican Victor Martinez, smooth-boxing Zsolt Bedak, and veteran Ivan Martinez late. Also stopped three-time title challenger Genaro Garcia, jabbing and countering his way to an easy stoppage victory in the seventh round. There again, Vazquez worked the body for a greater cause and showed good finishing instincts. Leading up to this fight, has played the “lack of respect” card to the media and opponent. In fairness to Vazquez, and looking at my previous writings on Vazquez Jr., he might be right. Perhaps, the press has been quick to lump him in the “only there because of his father’s name” category. This fight, against a well-respected fighter with world championship credentials, will go a long way in evaluating this generation of Vazquez.

    Verdict - Watching tapes of Vazquez Jr. again, he is a more lissome and instinctual than I gave him credit for. Arce is an experienced former champ but has been made to look better than he is by avoiding fast opposition. The little Mexican has the muscle memory to hang with Vazquez Jr. but slowing reflexes will not allow Arce to hurt Vazquez or escape his combinations. Vazquez Jr. will use his faster feet and hands, finding success as a counterpuncher using superior footwork to follow Arce out of exchanges. Those long punches will snap back the head of Arce, giving Vazquez Jr. a comfortable lead going into the final third of the fight. A desperate and bloody Arce will rally but looping punches in the championship rounds allow “WV2” to tag Arce with a short left hooks. A two-punch combination puts Arce down in the tenth round and a merciful referee waves it off without a count with Arce on all fours.

  22. #112
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    385
    vCash
    500

    Re: CompuBox Pre-Fight Analysis: Pacquiao vs. Mosley

    No way Pac stops Mosley. Not happening. I expect Pac to get rocked a time or two in there.

    And you also won't see Pac doing his usual 90 punches a round because Shane knows how to hold on to stop the momentum. Ask Margarito.

    I'll tell you one thing: Shane looked better at the weigh-in yesterday than he did for the Mayweather fight. People are so quick to forget the horrible circumstances Shane faced going into that one.

  23. #113
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    York, Pa.
    Posts
    33
    vCash
    500

    Re: Pac-Mosely - Much Ado over Nothing…but Money: the State of Big Fights in America

    If anyone is interested they're showing the undercard of this fight for free. I guess its the fights not even shown on the PPV channel.
    It's on Showtime; one of their affiliates

  24. #114
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    1,356
    vCash
    500

    Re: CompuBox Pre-Fight Analysis: Pacquiao vs. Mosley

    The Ledgers

    Manny Pacquiao 

    Age:
    32

    Current Titles: WBO Welterweight, 2009-Present, 1 Defense
    Previous Titles: Lineal/WBC World Flyweight 1998-99, 1 Defense; IBF Jr. Featherweight 2001-03, 4 Defenses; Lineal/Ring World Featherweight 2003-05, 2 Defenses; Lineal/Ring/WBC World Jr. Lightweight 2008; WBC Lightweight 2008-09; Lineal/Ring World Jr. Welterweight 2009-10; WBC Jr. Middleweight 2010
    Height: 5’6 ½

    Weight: 145 lbs.
    Average Weight – Last Five Fights: 142.85 lbs.

    Hails from: General Santos City, Cotabato del Sur, Philippines

    Record: 52-3-2, 38 KO
    BoxingScene Rank: #1 at Welterweight

    Record in Major Title Fights: 14-1-2, 11 KO, 1 KOBY (including Lineal title Fights)
    Current/Former World Champions/Titlists Defeated: 13 (Chatchai Sasakul, Lehlo Ledwaba, Jorge Eliecer Julio, Marco Antonio Barrera, Erik Morales, Oscar Larios, Juan Manuel Marquez, David Diaz, Oscar De La Hoya, Ricky Hatton, Miguel Cotto, Joshua Clottey, Antonio Margarito)

    Current/Former World Champions/Titlists Faced in Defeat or Draw: 4 (Medgoen Singsurat, Agapito Sanchez, Juan Manuel Marquez, Erik Morales)

    Vs.

    Shane Mosley
    Age:
    39
    Title: None
    Previous Titles: IBF Lightweight 1997-99, 8 Defenses; Lineal World/WBC Welterweight 2000-02, 3 Defenses; Lineal World/Ring/WBC/WBA Jr. Middleweight 2003-04, 0 Defenses; WBA Welterweight 2009-10
    Height: 5’9
    Weight: 147 lbs.
    Average Weight – Last Five Fights: 149.55 lbs.
    Hails from: Pomona, California
    Record: 46-6-1, 39 KO
    BoxingScene Rank: #3 at Welterweight
    Record in Title Fights: 15-6, 12 KO
    Current/Former World Champions/Titlists Defeated/No Contested: 9 (Phillip Holiday, John John Molina, Jesse James Leija, Oscar De La Hoya, Raul Marquez (NC), Fernando Vargas, Luis Collazo, Ricardo Mayorga, Antonio Margarito)
    Current/Former World Champions/Titlists Faced in Defeat or Draw: 5 (Vernon Forrest, Winky Wright, Miguel Cotto, Floyd Mayweather, Sergio Mor

  25. #115
    MANAGING EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    In an undisclosed bunker deep in the weird, wild, woods of the Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    11,450
    vCash
    500

    Pac-Mosley

    Early Results from Las Vegas
    By Francisco Salazar and Andreas Hale at ringside/Fight News

    Former amateur star Jose Benavidez, Jr. stopped game James Hope in the fifth round of a scheduled six round bout. Hope (6-8-1, 4 KO’s) was able to get a few punches in, but it was all Benavidez (11-0, 10 KO’s) the rest of the way as he landed vicious combinations. In the fifth, Benavidez pinned Hope in a corner, landing hard punches until referee Vic Drakulich stepped in and stopped the bout at 1:43.
    Canadian super lightweight Pier Oliver Cote stopped Aris Ambriz in the fourth round of a scheduled eight round bout. Cote (16-0, 11 KO’s) hurt Ambriz in the second and dropped him in the third with a left-right combination. In the fourth, Cote landed two hard right hands to the head of Ambriz (15-2-1, 8 KO’s), prompting referee Tony Weeks to stop the fight at 46 seconds.
    Lightweight Karl Dargan won a six round unanimous decision over Randy Arrellin. Dargan (9-0, 4 KOs) outworked the shorter Arrellin (8-5, 4 KOs), who pressed the fight during a majority of the fight. All three judges scored the bout for Dargan with scores of 59-55, 59-55, and 60-54.
    May 7th, 2011

  26. #116
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    1,034
    vCash
    500

    Re: CompuBox Pre-Fight Analysis: Pacquiao vs. Mosley

    I love the weigh in ritual and the analysis that follows.

    In appearance, Shane looks terrific in absolute terms, not just for a guy nearing 39 yo.

    However, to be honest, I see little difference in Shane's appearance from the Mayweather fight - he simply looks just as fit and ready to go but we know he gassed shortly after his brief success in tagging PBF so appearances aren't everything - particularly for a boxer who, while getting up in years, maintains a physique that well belies his age. At the end of the day, you just can't fool Father Time.

    As to Pac, pundits on other sites have suggested that Pac looks a little soft and not quite as cut as he was for Margarito. Imo, they're looking too hard. Pac looks every bit as defined as he was for Margarito. It's amazing how much Pacquiao splits himself up for this, that and the other engagement or pursuit and while not it's not ideal to multi-task himself in such fashion, I do think Manny is very good at compartmentalising his utmost focus and dedication to his many and varied pursuits.

    I'm really beginning to feel that Team Pac will be looking for a result that much more impressive than the one PBF achieved. Since PBF pitched a near shut out, we're talking a KO/Stoppage result and again, that's why this fight may be that much more competitive and perilous for Pac than was first thought.

    Then again...Team Mosley have uniformly suggested that they won't have to "look" for Pac, rather, Manny will bring the fight to Shane AS IF the tempo of the fight or at least early rd action will be determined by Pac, albeit predictable and well prepared for. What if Team Mosley is in fact creating a false sense of control for Manny and is in fact looking to meet Pac more than half way, fully knowing that Shane really only has a window of say 4 rds at best to offload his best stuff - perhaps an only rd blitzkrieg is in mind.

    So many angles and perspectives. We will soon find out.

  27. #117
    MANAGING EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    In an undisclosed bunker deep in the weird, wild, woods of the Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    11,450
    vCash
    500

    Re: Early Results from Las Vegas/Pac - Moseley + Holyfield/Nielson

    Alvarado wins

    By Andreas Hale and Francisco Salazar at ringside
    Featured undercard bouts at the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas:
    In an important junior welterweight clash unbeaten Mike Alvarado (30-0, 22 KOs) won by TKO when WBC #6 Sugar Ray Narh (25-2, 21 KOs) surprisingly quit on his stool after three fierce rounds. Alvarado wins the vacant WBC Continental Americas belt.
    May 7th, 2011

  28. #118
    MANAGING EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    In an undisclosed bunker deep in the weird, wild, woods of the Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    11,450
    vCash
    500

    Re: Early Results from Las Vegas/Pac - Moseley + Holyfield/Nielson

    Off TV Results from Las Vegas

    By Andreas Hale and Francisco Salazar at ringside
    Former flyweight world title holder Rodel Mayol won a 10 round majority decision over Javier Gallo. Mayol (28-5-2, 21 KO’s) would beat Gallo (17-4-1, 9 KO’s) to the punch early in the fight, but Gallo countered effectively in the later rounds. One judge scored the fight 95-95, while the other two judges scored the bout 98-92 in favor of Mayol.
    —–
    Former amateur star Jose Benavidez, Jr. stopped game James Hope in the fifth round of a scheduled six round bout. Hope (6-8-1, 4 KO’s) was able to get a few punches in, but it was all Benavidez (11-0, 10 KO’s) the rest of the way as he landed vicious combinations. In the fifth, Benavidez pinned Hope in a corner, landing hard punches until referee Vic Drakulich stepped in and stopped the bout at 1:43.
    —–
    Canadian super lightweight Pier Oliver Cote stopped Aris Ambriz in the fourth round of a scheduled eight round bout. Cote (16-0, 11 KO’s) hurt Ambriz in the second and dropped him in the third with a left-right combination. In the fourth, Cote landed two hard right hands to the head of Ambriz (15-2-1, 8 KO’s), prompting referee Tony Weeks to stop the fight at 46 seconds.
    —–
    Lightweight Karl Dargan won a six round unanimous decision over Randy Arrellin. Dargan (9-0, 4 KOs) outworked the shorter Arrellin (8-5, 4 KOs), who pressed the fight during a majority of the fight. All three judges scored the bout for Dargan with scores of 59-55, 59-55, and 60-54.
    May 7th, 2011

  29. #119
    MANAGING EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    In an undisclosed bunker deep in the weird, wild, woods of the Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    11,450
    vCash
    500

    Re: Early Results from Las Vegas/Pac - Moseley + Holyfield/Nielson

    Pavlik, Alvarado win
    By Andreas Hale and Francisco Salazar at ringside

    Featured undercard bouts at the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas:

    Former middleweight champion Kelly Pavlik (37-2, 32 KOs) won a ten round majority decision over previously unbeaten Alfonso Lopez (21-1, 16 KOs). Pavlik, now the WBC #1 super middleweight, needed a few rounds to get the rust off, but came on to win 98-92, 99-91, 95-95.
    —–
    In an important junior welterweight clash unbeaten Mike Alvarado (30-0, 22 KOs) won by TKO when WBC #6 Sugar Ray Narh (25-2, 21 KOs) surprisingly quit on his stool after three fierce rounds. Alvarado wins the vacant WBC Continental Americas belt.

  30. #120
    MANAGING EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    In an undisclosed bunker deep in the weird, wild, woods of the Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    11,450
    vCash
    500

    Re: Early Results from Las Vegas/Pac - Moseley + Holyfield/Nielson

    Kelly Pavlik decisions Alfonso Lopez
    By Dan Rafael
    ESPN.com

    LAS VEGAS -- Sporting plenty of new tattoo ink, and armed with his newfound sobriety, former middleweight champion Kelly Pavlik returned to the ring for the first time in 13 months and won a majority decision over Alfonso Lopez on Saturday night at the MGM Grand Garden Arena.

    The bout was one of the featured contests on the Manny Pacquiao-Shane Mosley undercard, a high-profile spot for Pavlik to make his return.

    Although the 29-year-old Pavlik looked quite rusty, that was to be expected. The Youngstown, Ohio, man was fighting for the first time since losing the middleweight title to Sergio Martinez by bloody decision in April 2010. Pavlik's problem with alcohol became worse after that and, after a family intervention, he went to alcohol rehabilitation. He spent two months there -- his second stint -- before coming out in January with an apparent commitment to sobriety and his career.

    Two judges scored the bout 99-91 while the third judge had it 95-95.

    "The ring rust sure showed, but I know I won the fight," Pavlik said. "I don't know what happened with that one scorecard [from Adalaide Byrd]. I felt I did pretty good. The ring rust showed." Said trainer Jack Loew: "There were two wins tonight. The first win was Kelly walking up the steps and getting in the ring. The second win was winning the fight."

    Pacquiao vs. Mosley
    For more on the May 7 fight, check our topics page.

    Pavlik plans to campaign in the 168-pound super middleweight division now and this fight was at 170 pounds. There was not a lot of clean punching as Pavlik and Lopez spent long stretches grappling on the inside.

    Pavlik, however, did land some solid right hands, including a bone-crunching one in the sixth round that seemed to hurt Lopez, 28, of Cut and Shoot, Texas, who was facing his first name opponent.

    Pavlik (37-2, 32 KOs), who says he has not had a drink since Nov. 1 or Nov. 2, did pick up some steam in the final round, hurting Lopez (21-1, 16 KOs) with another right hand and rattling him with several other shots. The crowd was getting excited for a knockout, but Lopez was able to survive the final 30 seconds, despite being in trouble.

    "I started feeling his power in the later rounds, but I think I deserved the draw," Lopez said. "I think I connected with a lot more shots than he did."

    So with his comeback out of the way, Pavlik will look for a bigger fight. Top Rank promoter Bob Arum has designs on an eventual fight between Pavlik and popular Montreal-based super middleweight titlist Lucian Bute.

    Bute's promoter, Jean Bedard of InterBox, had a fighter on the undercard and has a developing relationship with Top Rank and said that was a possible fight for Bute in the fall, should Bute win a July 9 fight that is in the works.

    [+] Enlarge
    Chris Farina/Top Rank
    Flyweight Rodel Mayol, right, of the Philippines, won a spirited majority decision against Mexico's Javier Gallo.
    •In the first bout of the pay-per-view telecast, Denver junior welterweight Mike Alvarado (30-0, 22 KOs) dominated Ray Narh (25-2, 21 KOs) of Ghana through three rounds, but had not done significant damage. However, Narh quit on his stool after the third round.

    Narh said he thought he ate something bad on Friday, when he was vomiting and had diarrhea. Alvarado, 30, had landed some strong jabs and right hands and Narh said he did not have the strength to go continue fighting.

    Narh, 32, had not lost since a first-round knockout in the same MGM Grand ring against Almazbek Raiymkulov in 2004.

    •Flyweight Rodel Mayol (28-5-2, 21 KOs), 29, of the Philippines, won a spirited majority decision against Mexico's Javier Gallo (17-4-1, 9 KOs) in his second bout since losing his junior flyweight title.

    Mayol and Gallo engaged throughout a fight, although Mayol seemed to get the better of the action. He won 98-92 on two scorecards while the third judge had it 95-95.

    Mayol won a 108-pound title in 2009 by stopping Edgar Sosa in the second round and then fought to a draw in his first title defense against Omar Nino before losing to Nino in an immediate rematch last June.

    [+] Enlarge
    Chris Farina/Top Rank
    Jose Benavidez, right, won by TKO over James Hope.
    •Phoenix junior welterweight Jose Benavidez (10-0, 9 KOs), who is just 18 but also one of Top Rank's most heralded prospects, hammered James Hope (6-8-1, 4 KOs) throughout the fight until referee Vic Drakulich intervened after Hope had absorbed too much punishment at 1 minute, 43 seconds of the fifth round of their scheduled six-rounder. Benavidez did a lot of damage working Hope to the body.

    •Junior welterweight prospect Pier Oliver Cote (16-0, 11 KOs), 26, of Canada looked outstanding in a dominant fourth-round knockout of Aris Ambriz (15-2-1, 8 KOs). Cote, with a flashy style and fast hands, took it Ambriz, of Azusa, Calif., throughout the fight. Cote dropped him to the seat of his pants in the second round and stopped him at 46 seconds of the fourth round when referee Tony Weeks stepped in after an accumulation of punches.

    •Lightweight Karl Dargan (9-0, 4 KOs) took a lopsided unanimous decision against Randy Arrellin (8-5, 4 KOs) of Albuquerque, N.M., in the first fight of the night. Dargan, 25, of Philadelphia, was a standout amateur and is trained by Naazim Richardson, his cousin, who is also Mosley's trainer.

    Dan Rafael is the boxing writer for ESPN.com. Follow him on Twitter @danrafaelespn.

+ Reply to Thread
Page 4 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
News Current Champs WAIL! Encyclopedia Links Home