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Thread: Hatton Speaks: Why He Turned Down A Mayweather Fight Twice

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    Hatton Speaks: Why He Turned Down A Mayweather Fight Twice

    Hatton Speaks: Asked why he turned down a Mayweather Fight Twice this year from Dog House Boxing


    Ricky Hatton
    In an International Press conference held yesterday, Ricky Hatton was told that Bruce Trampler of Top Rank, Mayweather’s now former promoter had said that Ricky turned down a fight with Mayweather at least twice this year and that he would not be facing him this year. Hatton was asked if this was correct?

    Here is what Ricky Hatton had to say on the subject:

    RICKY HATTON: Well, me personally it wasn’t done but I mean I can’t be speaking for their – you know for my team or – to be honest this year it would be stupid to admit with a fight with Mayweather because I have so many problems with – problems outside the ring where my father promoted (INAUDIBLE) obviously we were sitting trying to do a deal with HBO.

    I was in negotiations with that when my current promoter and he’s my new promoter, you know, from Artie Pelullo, Robert Waterman and Dennis Hobson. He was who had the court case with Souleymane M’Baye was claiming (INAUDIBLE) fight. There were so many things going on and it’s been difficult to – you know to basically get on with the fighting so to speak, you know, with the negotiations.

    But I think the sensible thing is, you know, I’ve – I don’t think that when I come straight out of England and fight in the first time in America and fight Floyd Mayweather, you know. To be perfectly honest with you I think that would be a stupid thing to do.

    I mean for instance Floyd Mayweather, you know, said on many occasions a few years back he would come to Manchester and he would fight me in front of me own crowd and he would knock me out and do all this crap what he’s been saying and now he’s all of a sudden decided – seems a bit cautious (INAUDIBLE) and don’t – during – over the last 12 months he didn’t want to come to Manchester.

    So, you know, if I was going to be (INAUDIBLE), you know, maybe he don’t want to fight me. He said he was going to come to Manchester now he’s changed his mind. So I’m not inviting Floyd. Floyd’s not inviting me. You know and I had a lot going on in the last 12 months but me and Floyd will get it together. So I’ll fight everybody once but I think – you know I have not fight in the United States for a number of years now so I think it’s important that I’ve done my deal now with my new promoters and we’re with HBO and we know what direction we’re going.

    Hopefully the court case with my (INAUDIBLE) promoter with (INAUDIBLE) – will get squashed and the case with Souleymane M’Baye and then you know we can start looking about positive things like a fight with Mayweather but it’s a been a difficult 12 months for me and ...

    I mean I’m not saying that, you know, my feet have turned down a fight with Mayweather it may be that (INAUDIBLE) answer for them but there been a little bit confusion, you know, over lately what me team would be. You know, I’ve just only just recently signed with HBO and Dennis Hobson and Robert Waterman of Fight Academy and Art Pelullo of banner Promotions and it’s nice to know what direction you’re going in.

    I think you need to know what direction you’re going in before you can make a decision like on a fight with Mayweather.

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    Re: Hatton Speaks: Why He Turned Down A Mayweather Fight Twice

    Sounds like another pampered foreigner who thinks the American star should go to his backyard to fight. No matter. Floyd will beat him down when they do fight. Too fast and too good.

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    Re: Hatton Speaks: Why He Turned Down A Mayweather Fight Twice

    But there are good economic reasons for Floyd to go, too. He is guaranteed to draw huge in Manchester. In the US, FLoyd couldn't draw flies if he covered himself in maple syrup.

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    Re: Hatton Speaks: Why He Turned Down A Mayweather Fight Twice

    Associate editor, Todd Hodgson once said to me, "Floyd Mayweather couldn't sell out the cafeteria at his Grand Rapids highschool". I thought it was pretty funny & in the past that was definitely true.

    But the PPV #'s that Floyd has garnered in his fights with Gatti & Zab tell a different story. Floyd can make plenty of $$$ here in the States. Why should he put himself at risk - not just from Hatton but the crowd itself?

    Once again, pro boxing is NOT about glory or legacy. If they happen, great. But that's just a by product. A managers job is to get the most reward with the least amount of risk for his fighter.

    Period.

    All the legacy, what's right, what's wrong is just fan bullshit. Pro boxing is a business. A down & dirty business & what it's about is making money & minimizing the risks.

    GorDoom

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    Gordoom

    It is a business. And as long as a Fighter does not care about legacy or fan/historical perception and perspective, then I agree he should go and do what is right by his wallet.

    But fighters all too often do want the accolades and the legacy, then they need to go out and secure it by taking on the chellenges that will ge them this.

    Boxing is a sport for the fans. Fans drive the live and pay per view gates. And fans want their champs to face the best out there. Other sports ARE different, but each year the cream rises to the top and the best teams face each other for the right to be called champion.

    Imagine if Team sports were like boxing and the champ wasn't crowned every year and instead once a Superbowl title was won, the Pitsburgh Steelers only opted to play against the Houston Texans.

    Professional Team sports is a business too. But it does work out where the best does have to face the best or at least the team who my have knocked off the best.

    Sitting on a title and ONLY playing out the risk/reward everytime out is not healthy for the sport.

    Am I saying that is ALL Mayweather has ever done? No. Earlier in his championship career he DID take risks. He has not done so IMO for a while now. ANd while that may indeed be smart managing, it does dillute a champion's value. And if the public does not see value in the championship, they will in turn keep away.

    Are we there yet? No. But if you devalue your reign, over the long run, you ultimately are devaluing your asking price of those who pay to see you. or more to the point: Those who may very well stay away.

    Legacy translates into dollars.

    Sugar Ray Leonard was going to make a lot of money without taking on the challenges he did. He made MORE money by taking on those challenges.

    Does Mayweather HAVE the opp out there for him that SRL had in the 80's? No. But there are more attractive matchups for him to take that would translate in to more money and as a side affect of that, builds value to his legacy.

    I'm not a fan of Oscar De La Hoya, but like SRL, he could make lots of money taking on Pat CHapentier 3 times a year. But if that ALL he ever faced, eventually that cash cow gets milked dry. He knew that he had to start facing the Whitakers and Quartey's and Trinidads and Mosley's to A- make even MORE money. And B- to keep that fan insterest in him as a Championship level fighter who took on the bigger names.

    Mayweather may think he doesn't need this. But I think unless he intends to walk away tomorrow, he will find out that he absolutely needs to fight the big names with the big rewards and with it, the big money.

    Just my opinion, I could be wrong.

    Hawk

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    Re: Hatton Speaks: Why He Turned Down A Mayweather Fight Twice

    He can fight Hatton here. If they did it in Fenway in Boston they would sell it out. If they did it at Yankee or Shea Stadiums with the Irish population of New York they may not sell out but they would draw 30-40 thousand if promoted correctly. If they did it in Vegas they would sell it out.

    How about both Hatton & Calzaghe coming over HERE to prove their bonafides. Boxing may be on the downswing in America but the United States is STILL the capital of boxing & the proving ground for any foreign fighter.

    & let's face it, Hatton does not have a resume close to Floyd's. Beating Tszyu after an almost 3 year layoff & multiple training injuries not to mention Kostya's age & Hatton's home field advantage ...

    Yes it was a big victory for the Brit but it wasn't the challenge people make it out to be. Tszyu had torn his right Achilles tendon & could no longer throw the right with the power he used to.

    Does anybody really believe that Hatton would have walked through all those right hands if Kostya was 100%? If you do I'll sell you a bridge in Brooklyn.

    Don't get me wrong, I really relish watching Hatton fight. he's exciting as hell but he IS limited & cut prone. Fans tend to go overboard after every win. Let's see Hatton face some stiff competition before we annoint him, "great".

    Hatton is a rough & tumble fighter with a lot of guts but I truly wonder if people would be so hyped up on him if he wasn't white.

    & before anybody calls me a racist, I'm white but not blind to how skin color makes a huge difference in fan perception. If you don't believe me, ask Gerry Cooney or Boom Boom Mancini, two very limited but gutsy fighters that made millions because of their skin color.

    GorDoom

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    Re: Hatton Speaks: Why He Turned Down A Mayweather Fight Twice

    Quote Originally Posted by GorDoom
    Associate editor, Todd Hodgson once said to me, "Floyd Mayweather couldn't sell out the cafeteria at his Grand Rapids highschool". I thought it was pretty funny & in the past that was definitely true.

    But the PPV #'s that Floyd has garnered in his fights with Gatti & Zab tell a different story. Floyd can make plenty of $$$ here in the States. Why should he put himself at risk - not just from Hatton but the crowd itself?

    Once again, pro boxing is NOT about glory or legacy. If they happen, great. But that's just a by product. A managers job is to get the most reward with the least amount of risk for his fighter.

    Period.

    All the legacy, what's right, what's wrong is just fan bullshit. Pro boxing is a business. A down & dirty business & what it's about is making money & minimizing the risks.

    GorDoom
    So true, Gor I agree with you that Pro Boxing is a business and every thing you said is right on the money.

    Frank B.

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    Re: Gordoom

    Hawk,

    Well said. I agree with just about everything you said and you're right: The athlete can't have it both ways.

    Deepak

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    Re: Hatton Speaks: Why He Turned Down A Mayweather Fight Twice

    Deepak:

    Since when? Ever heard of Roy "No Stones" Jones? He certainly had it both ways. Besides Floyd ALREADY has faced much stiffer comp than Ricky. Besides a depleted Tszyu, other than Euro-trash, who has he beaten?

    GorDoom

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    Re: Hatton Speaks: Why He Turned Down A Mayweather Fight Twice

    Quote Originally Posted by GorDoom
    Deepak:

    Since when? Ever heard of Roy "No Stones" Jones? He certainly had it both ways. Besides Floyd ALREADY has faced much stiffer comp than Ricky. Besides a depleted Tszyu, other than Euro-trash, who has he beaten?

    GorDoom
    Gordoom,
    There were many fans (myself included) that did not give Roy Jones credit for fighting all the worthless mandatories that HBO funded. So no I did not support Roy for doing that and then talking about respect from the fans for being unstoppable, blah, blah, blah. As far as agreeing with Hawk's post, this is the post I agreed with:
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------
    It is a business. And as long as a Fighter does not care about legacy or fan/historical perception and perspective, then I agree he should go and do what is right by his wallet.

    But fighters all too often do want the accolades and the legacy, then they need to go out and secure it by taking on the chellenges that will ge them this.

    Boxing is a sport for the fans. Fans drive the live and pay per view gates. And fans want their champs to face the best out there. Other sports ARE different, but each year the cream rises to the top and the best teams face each other for the right to be called champion.

    Imagine if Team sports were like boxing and the champ wasn't crowned every year and instead once a Superbowl title was won, the Pitsburgh Steelers only opted to play against the Houston Texans.

    Professional Team sports is a business too. But it does work out where the best does have to face the best or at least the team who my have knocked off the best.

    Sitting on a title and ONLY playing out the risk/reward everytime out is not healthy for the sport.

    Am I saying that is ALL Mayweather has ever done? No. Earlier in his championship career he DID take risks. He has not done so IMO for a while now. ANd while that may indeed be smart managing, it does dillute a champion's value. And if the public does not see value in the championship, they will in turn keep away.

    Are we there yet? No. But if you devalue your reign, over the long run, you ultimately are devaluing your asking price of those who pay to see you. or more to the point: Those who may very well stay away.

    Legacy translates into dollars.

    Sugar Ray Leonard was going to make a lot of money without taking on the challenges he did. He made MORE money by taking on those challenges.

    Does Mayweather HAVE the opp out there for him that SRL had in the 80's? No. But there are more attractive matchups for him to take that would translate in to more money and as a side affect of that, builds value to his legacy.

    I'm not a fan of Oscar De La Hoya, but like SRL, he could make lots of money taking on Pat CHapentier 3 times a year. But if that ALL he ever faced, eventually that cash cow gets milked dry. He knew that he had to start facing the Whitakers and Quartey's and Trinidads and Mosley's to A- make even MORE money. And B- to keep that fan insterest in him as a Championship level fighter who took on the bigger names.

    Mayweather may think he doesn't need this. But I think unless he intends to walk away tomorrow, he will find out that he absolutely needs to fight the big names with the big rewards and with it, the big money.

    Just my opinion, I could be wrong.

    Hawk
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------
    This post was about a general principle of fighting the best and making even bigger money than by fighting less talented fighters and milking the cash cow. I didn't make any comment about Hatton or Mayweather and who they have or haven't fought. Maybe my response was vague or you misunderstood it.

    Deepak

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    Re: Hatton Speaks: Why He Turned Down A Mayweather Fight Twice

    There are many variables that go into making big fights...In mayweathers case we are all way to impatient. He is 29 years old with several big fights under his belt, and we all clamor for him to fight a big fight everytime he gets into the ring, in fact we discredit exactly what he had done recently because he has not fought certain people who have not proven themselves or are not marketable yet.

    Since when is Gotti, and Judah pushovers for people in their weight class naturally much less a fighter that moves up. Yes if Mayweather goes these next two years and doesnt fight some of these big names then we have a major issue with him, but again name another fighter by the age of 29 that has won 4 different titles, beaten the quality of fighters he has. Not even Ray Leonard by the age of 29 accomplished this. Duran at 29 had not accomplished this. Chavez fought bumz, but he did fight some good fighters too and a lot of good fighters but not the great great fighters, nor did he ever beat a top tier fighter. You have to go back, way back for a fighter to accomplish what mayweather is possibly going to accomplish, by dominating 4 weight classes.

    Finally, we talked about mayweather,,from this article it appears that it is not all mayweathers fault that they have not fought. hat said, do you have any idea how much $ he would sacrifice if he did not leave his schedule open for DLH, or even if he fought Hatton now versus weighting for Hatton to gain some marketability here in the states.

    Give mayweather 2 years then lets form an valid opinion.

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    Re: Hatton Speaks: Why He Turned Down A Mayweather Fight Twice

    Tszyu was so inactive, old, and injury-prone that he blasted out Sharmba Mitchell five months prior to Hatton. Tszyu never got injured leading up to or during the Hatton fight. I think two people on this board picked Hatton to beat Tszyu, and virtually no one in the American media (other than Manny Steward and crold) picked Hatton.

    Crack on Hatton's wrestling and bending of the rules all you want. I agree that the rules were bent for him and it would've been a different story in the U.S. or Australia. But to cite all this age, injury, and inactivity stuff now that the fight's over -- if that stuff was so glaringly obvious, why didn't anyone mention it BEFORE the fight?

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    Re: Hatton Speaks: Why He Turned Down A Mayweather Fight Twice

    I did. More than once. In fact I remember writing that if Hatton beats a shop worn Tszyu all of a sudden everybody was going to jump on the Hatton bandwagon & anoint him, great & THE next big thing.

    I believe I called it.

    & the same thing has just happened with Calzaghe's win over Lacy. & the same thing happened with Michael Grant, Tua & now Lil' Klit. Fighters have one good/decent victory & suddenly to the fans they are the ONE.

    Usually these sudden hero's have very quick & steep falls in the public's esteem. Suddenly after they crash & burn, it's "Well he wasn't all that anyway ..."

    Over zealous fans who don't know squa-doosh are all too common ...

    & Todd, if you remember, we talked about Hatton & Tszyu more than once before the fight.

    GorDoom

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    Re: Hatton Speaks: Why He Turned Down A Mayweather Fight Twice

    I predict a great match and a KT mid round KO. Hatton will have his moments though.

    I'm really pulling for Hatton but I agree with Tszyu by mid-rounds KO. I think Hatton gets hurt early.

    I say Kostya before 8.

    The only upset in this fight will be the expression on all the faces when Tsyzu beats Hatton in 5 rounds by TKO.

    I like Tszyu by k.o,late in the fight , Hatton is to e.z.to hit an he get hurt

    I've got a pretty good idea who is gonna win tommorrow night-Hint: it ain't Ricky.

    Tszyu. Tszyu in about 9.

    Just a few comments that were made before the Hatton v Tszyu fight by cyberzone members. Bit different now aint it Gentlemen. Some of you change more then the weather does here in UK. The truth is Tszyu might have beaten most any other fighter you could have put in the ring with him that night. He just ran into a scrapper who was just a little to much for the ageing champion to cope with. Makes me wonder if Hatton had been a USA fighter and had some the same job on Tszyu if people would have still be coming out with the same lame excuses for the loss.

    As for that article, Ricky in fact speaks pretty good English and nothing like the way it comes across in that article. No one is pretending that Hatton is the new Roberto Duran but at least give the guy the credit he is due for his effort and his win in spite of most peoples predications.

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    Re: Hatton Speaks: Why He Turned Down A Mayweather Fight Twice

    Quote Originally Posted by wpink
    Since when is Gotti, and Judah pushovers for people in their weight class naturally much less a fighter that moves up. .
    Gatti started off as a featherweight. He won his first minor belt at superfeather. Many thought Gatti would never win a title after his fights with Oscar and Ward because of the damage he took.

    In short, you're way off the mark about Gatti. He's no pushover, true, but the way his face swells up dooms him against a sharpshooter like Mayweather, so stylistically, he was a pushover which is why he was a lopsided underdog.

  16. #16
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    Re: Hatton Speaks: Why He Turned Down A Mayweather Fight Twice

    Quote Originally Posted by wildhawke11
    [[I predict a great match and a KT mid round KO. Hatton will have his moments though. ]]
    .
    I believe that was my quote. Well, I was half right, it was a great match, but turned out to be a late round KO for Hatton who had more than a few moments. Yeah, it appears the low blow turned it around, but it was also a payback lowblow, tit for tat.

    I'm unclear if Hatton or Warren refused the KT rematch or if KT really said he was retiring. The record is fuzzy because of the shady nature of deal making and public announcements.

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    Re: Hatton Speaks: Why He Turned Down A Mayweather Fight Twice

    Gor I'm in shock by your post describing this as a business...for years you sliced Roy Jones balls off because he displayed the exact same behaior about selecting major and not major fights. Despite dominating James Toney and beating Hopkins, moving up three weight classes and winning titles in all those divisions he was ripped for who he did not fight. Here you show completely different logic with Floyd, which I happen to agree with. What's up ?

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    Re: Hatton Speaks: Why He Turned Down A Mayweather Fight Twice

    Quote Originally Posted by GorDoom
    In fact I remember writing that if Hatton beats a shop worn Tszyu all of a sudden everybody was going to jump on the Hatton bandwagon & anoint him, great & THE next big thing.
    Not everyone is doing that. I'm not. I'd still favor Mayweather over Hatton, but I think it'd be a good fight. I understand being annoyed at people who are bandwagon jumpers, but that doesn't justify a backlash that's just as much of a stretch. There's a middle ground.

    There's also a middle ground with the "This is a business" attitude. Do people watch boxing to admire a fighter's business acumen? I want to see the sport's elite in competitive fights. Mayweather should do everything possible to make the most amount of money for the least amount of effort, but that doesn't mean I have to support it. Would there be cries of "This is a business" if Floyd lined up five more Brusseles-type guys with his $3.5 million HBO guarantee? (Speaking of "coddled"...) What if he lines up a rematch with Gatti, should Gatti beat Baldomir? Hey, it'd be great business! Who cares about seeing Floyd in a fight he might lose, as long as he's making lots of money?

    And Gor, don't forget, you helped dissuade me from going to Manchester to see Hatton-Tszyu live, because of the inevitable wipeout it'd be and the English-hooligan riot that would ensue...

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    Re: Hatton Speaks: Why He Turned Down A Mayweather Fight Twice

    Remember when Ricky Hatton would win his fights some time back like two years ago after winning against nobody saying he wanted a fight with Floyd Mayweather. How about all the fighters that he fought from the US going to fight him in Manchester why wasn't it stuiped for them back than. He has his ways of putting things but he has been pampered all the way so far. He knows after Floyd saw the Tszyu fight he has know intentions in fighting Hatton in Manchester and it is the smart move by Mayweather. He saw how bias the Ref was in that fight Hatton hitting behind the head with no warnings useing elbows apart from the low blows that weren't called low blows except one at the very end of the fight. I can't wait to see him fight a good inside fighter like Margarito or a good straight boxer that wont stand there with him and just boxes him. Also a good outside fighter that wont get on the ropes but for the second it takes him to get out at the sametime popping Hatton. He has met nobody like that yet! And as I mentioned before he has a W/T belt and I give him props for that but he hasn't showed me hes a champion just yet.

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    Re: Hatton Speaks: Why He Turned Down A Mayweather Fight Twice

    Quote Originally Posted by GorDoom
    Deepak:

    Since when? Ever heard of Roy "No Stones" Jones? He certainly had it both ways. Besides Floyd ALREADY has faced much stiffer comp than Ricky. Besides a depleted Tszyu, other than Euro-trash, who has he beaten?

    GorDoom
    Good god.

    I've been saying this for months and getting blasted by a few various members everytime I say it. Maybe I'm not the only one blind to what Hatton has really done in his boxing career, which is simply nothing.. Except proven how great of a fighter he is in Europe.

    Gor, right on the money. From your assesment of boxing, to your view on Hatton.

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    Re: Hatton Speaks: Why He Turned Down A Mayweather Fight Twice

    Thank you very much, Kurant. Apparently you & Mr. B are the only ones that seem to get my logic. I've been involved in boxing for 49 years as a boxer, cornerman & writer.

    I realise it's just my opinion but after 49 years I'd like to think it's an educated opinion. Star struck fans just don't seem to "get" the reality of boxing. & just because you've read some Ring magazine's, Trolled the boxing internet sites & read everything you can doesn't in ANY way make you a boxing expert.

    As Teddy Atlas used to say about my friend, Max Kellerman, "There's book learning (re: boxing) & then there's hands on experience". Max learned the book alright, he is very knowledgeable about the history of the sport but really doesn't understand what happens between the ropes or the back room viciousness of cutting a deal to make a fight.

    GorDoom

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    Re: Hatton Speaks: Why He Turned Down A Mayweather Fight Twice

    Gordoom - With all due respect - I don't think you need to be 49 years into the sport to see that the way that the entire business side of the sport is corrupted.

    I agree with the Hatton comment - I mean, even the commentary that night was so one eyed even an English Cyclops woulda said "Aw c'mon!" - Tsszyu dropped Hatton with a shot to the belly on the upper belt line and that was ruled low, Tszyu cops the most brutal left hook to the balls since Ken Buchanan and all of a sudden he's the greatest Enlgish fighter of all time?

    I give Ricky his due, as KT did on the night in a display of class you don't often see in boxing. However, I would like to think the jury is out on Hatton til he's had a few tests outside the UK...

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    Re: Hatton Speaks: Why He Turned Down A Mayweather Fight Twice

    Rocky Marciano and a few more i could name fought rough tough and did not exactly stick to the rules but that was ok, or at least part of the game. Hatton does pretty much the same and gets the big stick for it. Why dont people judge fighters both by the same yardstick when it comes to playing by the rules. Oh of course i forgot Marciano fought for the good old USA. Hatton is of course from UK where we have i suppose a lot more EURO TRASH.

    As for people who have not been pro fighters or in some ways connected to the fight game perhaps not understanding things in quite the same way as those who have been. I understand of course the line of thinking. But on the other hand. Is it really necessary to have home grown your own vegetables and reared your own beef to really tell the difference between a great meal and a bad one.

    Of course if there are any former fighters or people still connected with the fight game on here and with all of that experience and knowledge to fall back on when it comes to picking the winners in any future fights would any like to throw a few sure bets my way it would be well appreciated.

    I will tell you something guys when they first started showing a program called fight of the week from the USA here on our TV. I in fact in the end used to turn the sound down because the so called experts connected to the fight game were talking the biggest load of shit i have ever heard in my life. At best it was if they were talking to a class of ten year olds. I in fact have often told people on other boards when watching and judging a close fight a good tip is to turn the sound off. Because according to some so called experts commentating on the fights you would think there was only one guy in the ring at times.

    Might be interesting to run a competition on here between guys who have been connected to the fight game in one way or another and the other team of course consisting of guys who have not, in regard to picking the winners of any future fights. Of course it would be a landslide victory for the experts dont you think. Just remember an old saying. The worst tipster in a horse race is in fact often the jockey.
    Last edited by wildhawke11; 05-08-2006 at 12:43 AM.

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    Re: Hatton Speaks: Why He Turned Down A Mayweather Fight Twice

    good reply danny, stick up for your boys.

    me. i am so bad at picking winners that finaly getting one right last nite in DLH- mayorga has had me on air all day.

    i also found that article unintelligable. from what i got out of it it is an unfair knock on ricky hatton who is one of the most exciting guys in the sport. i liked the way hatton went after KT. if KT had gone back from injuries or whatever he was still the man that ricky had to get by and i appreciated the rough and tumble way he did it.

    there was a time in the states that eroupean fighters were critcised for their stand up approach to the sport and usually considered beatable here in the states. that has changed a great deal as evidenced by joe calzaghe and ricky hatton.

    you keep punching amigo.
    greg

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    Re: Hatton Speaks: Why He Turned Down A Mayweather Fight Twice

    I agree with Wildhawke as well. The boxing experts rarely ever pick the upsets, which is why they are upsets. Yes, they have more insight to the game in many ways, but they seem to be no more accurate than your educated fan.
    I feel that many people are now downplaying the signifigance of Hattons victory over Tszu. Tszu looked awesom destroying Mitchell and while I agree that this was not the KT of old, he was still a great fighter and a difficult fight for anyone. Ricky also impressed with his next win of an akward Muassa who took everything Cotto had to offer.
    Hatton seems to have good footwork and can close the distance verry well. He brings good power and great strength which will give anyone at his weight tons of trouble.
    As for the article, I also found it vague and difficult to understand. It seemed that Ricky was simply going through promotional problems at the time. It seems that many members on this board are polarised between Mayweather turning down fights and Hatton turning down fights. Many are convinced that you have to fight in the US to prove yourself when in fact, it is the countries outside the US that are providing us with the best fighters.
    Hatton still has a lot to prove but he has proved more at the 140 lbe weght thn Floyd has

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    How Things Just Got Tricky For Ricky ...

    Keep Your Hats On: How Things Just Got Tricky For Ricky
    By Ted Bodenrader from Max Boxing

    On a rainy May night, just a few blocks from a historic ocean harbor, six-thousand fight fans gathered to indulge in their very own Boston Tee Party.

    A hot British import named Ricky Hatton sailed into town, ready to tee off on whatever whipping boy was so purposefully put in front of him.

    Although Hatton had tussled three times on U.S. soil early in his remarkable 40-0 stretch, the Briton’s smackdown with New York’s Luis Collazo was the one being billed as his official American debut – his initiation into boxing superstardom, so to speak - and Hatton was determined to make it a smashing one.

    But was America ready to embrace this tasty commodity? Or like the British tea of over two centuries ago, would he be dumped straight back into the Atlantic?

    A few minutes shy of midnight on May 13, we weren’t quite sure of the answer ourselves, as the buildup to Hatton’s American debut gave way to a sea of questions and doubts.

    His face smothered in welts, his left eye encased in purple, Hatton was not quite the picture of intimidation that his promoter Art Pelullo was banking on when he settled in at the TD Banknorth Garden press conference to discuss the 12 troubling rounds that had just preceded him.

    The beating, courtesy of the deceptively tough Collazo, came as much of a surprise to many ringsiders as the unanimous decision verdict that would soon follow it, as Hatton slipped out of town like a slippery bandit into the night.

    Yet, not even the negative post-fight buzz could derail the feisty Hatton train, which is now rolling along at a spectacular 41-0 clip. Neither could the thrilling 12th round spectacle that saw Collazo pounding unmercifully away on the wobbly Hatton, who appeared all but out on his feet.

    When announcer Michael Buffer belted out the good news (judges Don O’Neill, 115-112, Paul Driscoll, 115-112, and Leo Gerstel, 114-113, all for Hatton), there was but one thing louder than the uproar of the three-thousand Brits on hand.

    It was the collective sign from Pelullo, Team Hatton, and the HBO brass, knowing that their long-term blueprints would remain, at least for now, comfortably in tact.

    As for Hatton, the unrelenting machine who drilled Kostya Tszyu into retirement last summer, the same one who capped many 2005 Fighter of the Year honors, he was suddenly replaced by a figure of glitches and flaws.

    “I think Ricky Hatton was exposed tonight as a very mechanical, one-dimensional brawler,” said ESPN host Brian Kenny, who was in agreement with this scribe’s 114-112 scorecard in favor of Collazo. “This is a guy we were looking at as the next great superstar and as you saw, he was almost knocked out in the final round. Think about that. That’s not what they wanted.”

    “No, I don’t think this was the kind of showing they were hoping for,” agree ESPN blow-by-blow man, Joe Tessitore. “I think they were coming over here to make a statement, to show a dominant figure in the welterweight division, and that’s not what happened at all.”

    Instead, Hatton-Collazo was eerily reminiscent of the last time a hot English slugger was being unloaded onto the American public with his eyes on a hefty seven-figure prize.

    In 1997, HBO network was ready to unveil Prince Nassem Hamed as the future fireplug of boxing, pitting him in New York against an aging Kevin Kelley in what seemed to be the ideal coming-out bash. Instead, Hamed tasted the canvas twice in a wild see-saw affair before finally putting Kelley away in a scintillating fifth. Although the flamboyant featherweight marked his American debut with an unforgettable victory, the real ‘V’ that night stood for something far different - vulnerability.

    In Boston, Hatton’s collision with Collazo began with the same sort of ‘bang’, as a stiff left to the chops dropped the New Yorker on his seat just ten seconds into the fight.

    However, 45 minutes later, the affair ended with Hatton stumbling about the ring like a drunken sailor, Collazo winging a furious attempt to put him away.

    In between was thirty minutes of grave astonishment, as Collazo, surviving the first-round scare, found himself a nifty groove, frustrating the head-first Hatton with his shifty, southpaw swagger.

    Not only was the Boston brawl Hatton’s first on HBO’s mega-scope, it also marked his debut in the 147-pound division, where his deafening power and sturdy legs were not enough to steamroll the bigger, craftier Collazo the way they did Tszyu and Carlos Maussa last year.

    “He was stronger than I ever thought he’d be,” admitted Hatton. “I noticed a big difference tonight. I still feel that I am a (natural) junior welterweight who moved up to welterweight to take this fight. He was hitting me with much harder punches than I’m used to.”

    While Hatton dug home enough of trademark power hooks to woo his frantic faithful, Collazo combated the smaller Brit with crisp right jabs followed up by darting straight lefts.

    As the effects began to take form around Hatton’s puffy eyes, gradually impairing his vision, one thing became blatantly clear to those taking in such a startling display.

    While Hatton was being primped for a juicy showdown with Floyd Mayweather, Jr., the “Hitman” had best erase the pound-for-pound elitist from his hit list – at least for now.

    “Hatton better stay the hell away from Mayweather for a while,” said popular Boston trainer/manager Norman “Stoney” Stone. “I’m not taking anything away from Collazo because the kid can fight and I thought he won this one by a few rounds. But if they put Hatton in with Mayweather, they’ll be carrying him out of there.”

    “They would be foolish to go after Mayweather at this point,” agreed Kenny. “That looked like it was going to be the next great matchup, but I think tonight did a lot of damage to the prospect of that fight happening. Everybody could see that Hatton is not ready for a guy like Floyd. If they took that fight now, they’d be throwing him straight to the wolves.”

    Yet, Hatton is the one that boxing die-hards had grown accustomed to in the predator’s role. With a hard-nosed, fast-forward approach, Hatton had become the sport’s ultimate pressure fighter, blowing through hardened vets like Ray Oliveira and Ben Tackie with legs that don’t sit and hands that don’t quit. Handlers assumed that same approach would spell success in this HBO showcase, even against the likes of a scrappy 5-foot-9 welterweight like Collazo.

    “And it sure went their way for the first ten seconds,” cracked Tessitore, referring to Hatton’s left-handed swipe that accounted for the fight’s only knockdown. “After that, it was obvious that he is not going to be so dominant at 147 pounds. He can’t expect to blow through these full-fletched welterweights like he did those smaller guys. He’s just not a natural welterweight.”

    Tessitore’s sentiment became increasingly clear, particular during the critical championship rounds, as the drama mounted among the 6,280 on hand. With the fight apparently up for grabs, never was the air of invincibility more absent than when Collazo caught Hatton with a hard left hand on the chin – and followed up with a downpour harder than even the one outside.

    With his senses lost somewhere in the upper deck, Hatton somehow survived the nasty onslaught and even managed to fire back, enchanting the crowd with a riveting fistic finale.

    But as was the case with Hamed (against Kelley), the performance left an entire sport to question whether this British hype machine was more fantasy than fact.

    Hence, the man England once revered as Superman in red mitts is now bearing a bright ‘V’ across his chest – and it stands for ‘vulnerability’.

    However, only in boxing can such an image improve one’s stature as a fan favorite (just ask Arturo Gatti), and Hatton may have become a more attractive counterpart for the some of the game’s marquee customers.

    “Although his performance left a lot to be desired, Ricky Hatton fans still have a lot to be happy about,” added Kenny. “I liked Ricky Hatton before this fight and I still like him now. He’s a great action fighter who doesn’t let up for a second.”

    “He won a lot of fans in that twelfth round when he refused to go down,” said Tessitore. “He showed a tremendous amount of heart and desire just to stay on his feet. It was really something.”

    But while Hatton failed to punctuate on his baptism into boxing’s best, the rising action star remains unclear on just where his next adventure will take him.

    “I’m going to stay in the division that gives me the best fights,” said Hatton, who admitted he was hurt by Collazo several times throughout the fight. “Whether that’s at 140 pounds or 147 pounds, I don’t know yet. I will fight anybody out there, and I approve of a rematch with Luis.”

    “If he is a man of his word, then I would love to go through with a rematch with him,” said Collazo. “But I advise him to go back down to 140 pounds. I believe if he gives me a rematch, I will knock him out.”

    With Mayweather strictly ruling the welterweight waters, the universal expectations seem to be that very thing. Many expect Hatton to wisely return to the very 140-pound division he once menaced.

    No longer had Hatton fled the ring that many insiders spoke of future fisticuffs with Arturo Gatti, of whom Hatton reminded us during his life-or-death struggle with Collazo in the final round.

    Others pointed to HBO favorite Miguel Cotto, a two-fisted entertainer in his own right, as well as rival Paul Malignaggi, who watched Collazo reign hard leather on Hatton’s skull from the front row.

    “He should come down and fight those guys because he can’t compete with those welterweights,” said Stone. “Hatton is a guy who depends on his strength and he’s not going to able to push those guys around. He needs to go back down to 140 pounds. He’s got better fights down there anyways.”

    Meantime, Hatton’s arrival in the United States was received in a concert-like uproar, but his impact was hardly reminiscent of the Beatles.

    While struggles like the one with Collazo establish him as a bona fide thrill machine, we’re not yet sure if we’re looking at anything special with this 27-year-old import.

    “I think Ricky Hatton is a very exciting, very fun guy to watch,” says Kenny. “Despite what we saw tonight, he still has a lot of star qualities and I think he can make some serious noise in this sport. But as one of the very top-level guys in boxing, I just don’t think he’s there quite yet.”

    While Hatton’s coming-out party was hardly a five-star success, he still proved himself as the life of a recent Boston Tee Party, regardless of whether he was teeing off on his nemesis - or was the one being teed off on.

    “You don’t have to worry about what you’re going to get with Ricky Hatton,” says Tessitore. “I’m sure a lot of people felt he lost the fight tonight, but in a way, it doesn’t matter. You always know he’s going to come with everything he’s got, and he’s not going to stop throwing punches until the final bell intervenes.”

    And in boxing, that kind of fighter seems to be everyone’s cup of tea.

    (Ted Bodenrader is a Boston-based boxing scribe who can be seen regularly on CN8’s “Sports Pulse” as the network’s “Boxing Insider.”

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