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Thread: SUDDENLY ONE SUMMER: THE RUSH OF GREATNESS THAT WAS ROBERTO DURAN by MIKE CASEY

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    SUDDENLY ONE SUMMER: THE RUSH OF GREATNESS THAT WAS ROBERTO DURAN by MIKE CASEY

    Suddenly One Summer: The Rush Of Greatness That Was Roberto Duran

    By Mike Casey


    When El Cholo first came to visit us in earnest, it was with a glorious rush of youth and fire that burned the blood and made the spine tingle. Given his charisma and volcanic presence, it seems hard to believe now that Roberto Duran had slipped in under the radar when he climbed through the ropes to challenge Ken Buchanan for the lightweight championship on the night of June 26 1972. Most of us knew that Duran was a wild kid from Panama with a big right hand punch who had been knocking a lot of guys out in the first round. Trouble was, we hadnít heard of most of the guys.

    They were calling Duran Rocky in those days, not El Cholo or Manos de Piedra. The nickname, like the fighter, was still in transition as the formula for greatness bubbled and gelled tantalisingly into the final product.
    Only as his greatness matured and the years rolled by with gathering momentum and gathering moss would the stories about Duran multiply and grow to near mythical proportions. In the beginning, we had very little background flesh to hang on the bones of the lean young killerís body. But oh, did he look like a fighter! Lean and sinewy, all springs and coils, powerful and sleek, Duran was the nearest human equivalent I have seen to a predatory animal. The lionís mane of jet-black hair was perfectly apt, but it was the almost satanic twinkle in the eye that set Roberto apart from the rest. Such a look can never be cultivated or faked. A man either has it or he doesnít. It represents the chilling invitation to come into his domain and try and beat him at the ultimate game of life and death.

    We would learn, not greatly to our surprise, that little in Duranís life was regimented or even basically structured. Small wonder that the Internal Revenue Service eventually homed in on his finances, since one could never quite imagine Roberto poring over his balance sheets and keeping tabs on his spending. He spent money when he was a rich man because he never had it when he was a poor boy. He fought his fights, held celebratory parties on the beach with his family and friends and spoke his mind to anyone who asked him his opinion.

    An airline pilot discovered the prickly side of Duranís nature when he asked him how he thought he would fare against Sugar Ray Leonard. ďIíll kill Leonard,Ē Duran replied, ďand if you donít stop bugging me, Iíll kill you.Ē
    After battering Ray Lampkin in a lightweight title defence and sending him to hospital, Duran allegedly barked, ďNext time Iíll put him in the morgue.Ē The social graces were never among Robertoís greatest attributes.
    Only in later life did the fiery Panamanian mellow and show his softer side. He wept as he embraced former opponent Esteban DeJesus in a prison hospital, when AIDS was sucking Estebanís life away from him. Duran also became more open and encouraging to a new generation of young fighters who regarded him as their idol, while he and Ken Buchanan recently reunited after more than thirty years to bury the bad feelings that had lingered after their epic fight at the Garden.

    Perhaps Duran, as a gnarled and retired old warrior, has finally come to terms with the more mundane and less challenging aspects of life. For years, life without boxing and its unique excitement was an impossible pill for him to swallow. When he was still slugging away in his late thirties, losing more fights than he should have done, he famously said, ďI was born to fight. I do not know what else to do.Ē

    Greatest

    In my lifetime, I have never seen a greater pound-for-pound fighter than Roberto Duran. He possessed the talent, the skill, the versatility and the arrogance that the greatest trainers can never instil into manufactured fighters. He was indeed a wild one, but the wildness came with the cunning and inherent discipline of a chess master. Few fighters have those instincts built into them.

    Such was Duranís ferocity in his glorious prime that many observers were blind to his more subtle skills, such as his ability to slip and block punches and counter with unerring accuracy. His punching power in his peak years as a lightweight was tremendous.

    As a youth, he survived the often ferocious streets of his native Panama, where deaths from teenage knife fights were common. As a young man, he served his professional apprenticeship in the cauldrons of suffocating little fight arenas throughout Panama and Mexico. In taking the lightweight championship from Ken Buchanan at Madison Square Garden, Duran beat a master boxer out of sight. In winning the welterweight title from Sugar Ray Leonard eight years later, he outfought and out-thought a master strategist in producing his greatest performance.

    As he moved into the sunset of his magnificent career, the slower but wiser Duran still managed to win versions of the junior middleweight and middleweight titles in fights he was expected to lose against tough young guns in Davey Moore and Iran Barkley.

    Challenging the great Marvin Hagler proved a step too far in 1983, but it was noticeably Hagler who looked the more intimidated as he cautiously punched out a unanimous points victory.

    What added to Duranís charisma was his fiery temperament and inner demons, which he didnít always manage to keep in check. In his second fight with Leonard, he suddenly stopped dead in the eighth round and walked away uttering his now famous cry of "No mas" (No more).

    Duran was accused of quitting, which he surely did, but not for some of the fanciful reasons offered at the time. He had come to fight while Leonard had come to play mind games. Taunting Duran and winding up punches in theatrical style, Leonard got into the mind of the machismo warrior and completely tore it apart. It was too much for such an intensely proud man to bear, and Duranís most likely thought as he waved himself out of action was a simple, ĎThe hell with this, Iím going homeí.

    That was eight years after Roberto had ripped the lightweight championship from Ken Buchanan and cleaned out the division with twelve defences over six electrifying years. For Buchanan, the coming of Duran was a rude and violent awakening. The brilliantly skilful, gritty Scot had endeared himself to American fans with his ringcraft and his ability to tough it out in the trenches. Ken had already encountered one great Panamanian and seen him off twice. In the blazing heat of day in San Juan, Buchanan had taken the title from Ismael Laguna in a gruelling fifteen rounder. The decision was split, but Ken confirmed his superiority in the return match at Madison Square Garden, where he rallied down the stretch superbly to capture a unanimous verdict.

    Buchanan was hailed by none other than Ring editor Nat Fleischer as a boxing wizard of the old school, and it seemed that Ken would reign over the lightweights for a good few years. Then he met Duran: a wild child, an underdog, just a big banger with a string of knockouts over lower grade competition. How good could the kid be? Over the course of thirteen brutal rounds, Buchanan would learn that Roberto Duran was the best of his generation, one of those greats who come along to raise the bar and damn the very good.

    Knockdown!

    It is near impossible to read a fighterís mind and ascertain when the seeds of doubt are first planted on those nights when it all goes wrong. For Buchanan, it went wrong shortly after the opening bell. One incident, not shattering in its immediate impact but certainly destructive in its long term significance, threw the champion and everyone else into disarray. Referee Johnny LoBianco called a knockdown as Duran clipped Buchanan and sent him half down with a grazing left to the head.

    Even Don Dunphy, that most excellent of commentators, was caught out. Measured and sensible in just about everything he ever said, Don wasnít given to loud outbursts or unnecessary melodrama. But as Buchanan scrambled up, Dunphy cried, ďThat is not scored a knockdown Ė yes it is! Johnny scores it as a knockdown!Ē

    Duranís early success was not an aberration. Buchanan knew at once that he was sharing the ring with a man on fire, a very special talent. In the hurly burly of those opening seconds, Ken fired back and knocked Roberto off balance with a solid left hook, but quickly discovered that his tormentor was not one to be deterred.

    Duran was unleashing punches with both hands and showing terrific hand speed. His well publicised right, in particular, was lightning fast and effective in its delivery. Don Dunphy had already recognised the scale of Buchananís task: ďHeís in there with no cream puff. Duranís just dynamite with his right hand.Ē

    Legendary trainer Ray Arcel had come out of retirement to coach Duran and was obviously pleased with the start made by his hungry young lion. The Garden was buzzing and a cacophony of noise as the bagpipes of Buchananís supporters competed with a Panamanian band.

    Ken began the second round like a man determined to restore order. He was the champion and a big favourite. Maybe this fiery kid before him would have his moment in the sun and quickly blow out. Ken got his jab working but simply couldnít find a way to avoid Robertoís punches. Not only were they fast, they were fired off with constant variety and came raining in from all angles. Everything about Duran moved and jiggled and bounced, yet in perfect harmony. His head movement was superb, as was his timing and balance. He judged distance beautifully, never lunging or looking awkward. ďWin or lose this one, I have a feeling Duran will be back,Ē Don Dunphy prophetically announced.

    Roberto offered Ken no rest inside, banging to the ribs and pounding short punches to the stomach. Buchanan tried to discourage his challenger with one or two effective uppercuts and certainly seemed to be finding his rhythm in a calmer fourth round, but the championís few successes were being swamped by the greater volume of return fire.
    In the fifth round, Buchanan ran into a firestorm. A left and two smashing rights to the chin drove him to the ropes and his mouthpiece came out as Duran swarmed over him. Even though he was still raw, the young Panamanian ace was already showing the instinct of the greats. Nothing he did seemed robotic or consciously planned. His movement was fast and fluid, his punches flowed naturally.

    The fight was charging along, fast and bumpy like a train going over the points, as Duran the engine driver sucked up Buchanan and the crowd in his slipstream and raced for the terminus. In the sixth round, commentator Dunphy compared the pace of the bout to that of the Beau Jack-Bob Montgomery thriller of years gone by. Somewhere within the general maelstrom, Buchanan found a rail to cling to as he re-discovered his boxing skills and began to more effectively evade Duranís sweeping rushes. It was a better round for Ken, but that was his problem. His moments of joy were too short-lived and were inevitably wiped out by another torrent.

    However, the expected backlash from Roberto didnít follow in the seventh. He unveiled a jolting jab from long range and continued to ruffle Buchanan with vicious, chopping shots to the jaw in close, but it was Ken who won the plaudits of the crowd as he began to jab brilliantly and tagged the challenger with a hurtful right to the body.

    Duran appeared irritated with himself at having failed to make further progress and flew from his corner at the beginning of the eighth. A swelling was coming up above Kenís left eye and he began to trade with Roberto in an attempt to slow the runaway train. Don Dunphy proved a wise old sage again in the ninth as he commented, ďBuchananís looking a little better, but every time I say that he runs into one.Ē

    Boy oh boy, did Ken run into one. He was nailed by a cracking right to the chin in his corner, but showed tremendous heart and fighting spirit as he took the play away from Duran with a beautifully timed countering left hook. Following up with an array of jabs and hooks, Buchanan incredibly turned the tide to post his best round of the fight.

    Heartened by his success, the champion increased the power of his punches in the tenth round, winging solid left and right hooks to Robertoís body. Both men teed off with good shots to the chin, but the difference between them was now graphically clear. Buchanan looked like a man who was in the fight of his life, who had to dig and scrap and claw for every small piece of turf he gained. Duran looked the same as he had done from the outset, an implacable and relentless animal of a man who could not seem to be significantly hurt or deflected from his purpose.

    Tide

    Buchanan was charting his way through the choppy waters with further success in the eleventh round when the storm began to rage again. Some of Kenís skilfully placed punches were almost too fast to be seen in real time and he was now blocking many of Duranís body shots. Then came the sudden rush of power and fury that would break the hearts of so many men in the years to follow, as Roberto erupted. He found the boxing masterís chin with a vicious salvo, bulling him halfway through the ropes in the big surge that followed.

    Buchanan was now looking noticeably tired. He had played his best cards and found nothing with which to extinguish the raging inferno. Duran sensed his time was coming. He was still full of life and full of fire, revelling gloriously in the one arena of life that he completely loved and understood. Out fast for the twelfth, he caught Buchanan with a big left-right combination and punished the champion with head-jerking uppercuts up close. Ken just couldnít get out of the way of the flying leather and teetered closer to the cliff edge when he was hammered by a tremendous right to the chin. Incredibly, the blow did not even stagger Buchanan, whose heart and ability to take a punch was exemplary.

    But the champion was now spiralling ever downwards. He needed the respite that natural ring killers never allow, and he needed a lot more points to save his crown. The last crucial rounds were slipping from his grasp and Duran just kept punching, switching his blows from the head to the body.

    As the thirteenth round opened, each fighterís agenda was perfectly simple. Duran wanted the knockout. Buchanan needed it. Right away, the omens were not good for Ken. He grimaced in pain as Roberto went low with a right, a portent of things to come. Buchanan broke free of his tireless pursuer and bounced up and down as he tried vainly to shake fresh life into his arms and legs Duran was hunting him down all the time, but Ken was firing back defiantly when the two fighters moved to the ropes at the sound of the bell. But that wasnít the end of the action.

    Bang! A sweeping right from Duran caught Buchanan below the belt and sent him tumbling to the canvas, writhing in pain. Uproar and confusion followed as Kenís handlers helped him back to his corner. The champion was still in apparent distress when the warning whistle sounded for the fourteenth, as trainer Gil Clancy and father Tommy Buchanan made their protests.

    The complaints cut no ice with referee Johnny LoBianco, who ruled the blow irrelevant since it came after the bell. The fight was stopped and Duran was declared the new champion. For years afterwards, well over two decades in fact, Buchanan would feel bitter about the circumstances of Duranís coronation and never miss a chance to remind his old foe of that burning, violent night in New York.

    Was the punch low? Very definitely. Could Buchanan have won the fight if he had continued? Not in the opinion of this writer. The circumstances were unfortunate for all concerned, but Roberto Duran was a force apart, a man of destiny who was always going to tear down the barricades of the church and claim the crown.
    It happened suddenly that summer. It would have happened anyway.

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    Re: SUDDENLY ONE SUMMER: THE RUSH OF GREATNESS THAT WAS ROBERTO DURAN by MIKE CASEY

    ROBERTO DURAN'S CAREER RECORD

    Cyber Boxing Champion
    Roberto Duran
    "Manos de Piedras"

    Born: June 16, 1951, Guarare, Panama

    Pro Record: 104-15 (69 kayos)



    PREPARADA POR: ROGELIO PEREZ D.


    No. FECHA LUGAR CONTRARIO ASALTOS RUTA


    1968
    1 FEB 23 COLON CARLOS MENDOZA 4 GDU
    2 ABR 04 COLON MANUEL JIMENEZ 4 GKO1
    3 MAY 14 COLON JUAN GONDOLA 4 GKO1
    4 JUN 30 COLON EDUARDO MORALES 4 GKO1
    5 AGO 10 COLON ENRIQUE JACOBO 6 GKO1
    6 AGO 25 PANAMA LEROY CARGILL 6 GKO1
    7 SEP 22 PANAMA ULISES DE LEON 6 GKO1
    8 NOV 16 COLON CARLOS HOWARD 6 GDECU
    9 DIC 07 PANAMA CARLOS HOWARD 6 GKO1

    1969
    10 ENE 19 PANAMA ALBERTO BRAND 6 GKOT4
    11 FEB 01 PANAMA EDUARDO FRUTOS 6 GDU
    12 MAY 18 PANAMA JACINTO GARCIA 8 GKOT4
    13 JUN 22 PANAMA ADOLFO OSSES 10 GKOT7
    14 SEP 21 PANAMA SERAFIN GARCIA 10 GKOT5
    15 NOV 23 PANAMA LUIS PATI—O 10 GKOT8

    1970
    16 MAR 28 MEXICO FELIPE TORRES (MEX) 10 GDU
    17 MAY 16 PANAMA ERNESTO MARCEL 10 GKOT10
    18 JUL 18 COLON CLEMENTE MUCI—O (MEX) 10 GKO6
    19 SEP 05 CHIRIQUI MARVIN CASTA—EDAS (CR) 10 GKO1
    20 OCT 18 PANAMA NACHO CASTA—EDAS (MEX) 10 GKO2

    1971
    21 ENE 10 MEXICO JOSE A. HERRERA (MEX) 10 GKO6
    22 MAR 21 PANAMA JOSE ACOSTA (COL) 10 GKO1
    23 MAY 29 PANAMA LLOYD MARSHALL (USA) 10 GKOT6
    24 JUL 18 MEXICO FERMIN SOTO (MEX) 10 GKOT3
    25 SEP 13 USA BENNY HUERTAS (PR) 10 GKO1
    26 OCT 16 PANAMA Hiroshi Kobayashi (JAP) 10 GKO7

    1972
    27 ENE 15 PANAMA ANGEL R. GARCIA (CUB) 10 GDU
    28 MAR 10 PANAMA FRANCISCO MU—OZ (MEX) 10 GKO1
    29 JUN 26 USA KEN BUCHANNAN (IRL) 15 GKOT13
    PELEA POR EL TITULO MUNDIAL LIGERO AMB
    30 SEP 02 PANAMA GREG POTTER (USA) 10 GKO1
    31 OCT 28 PANAMA LUPE RAMIREZ (MEX) 10 GKO1
    32 NOV 17 USA ESTEBAN DE JESUS (PR) 10 PDU

    1973
    33 ENE 20 PANAMA JIMMY ROBERTSON (USA) 15 GKO5
    PELEA POR EL TITULO MUNDIAL LIGERO AMB
    34 FEB 22 USA JUAN MEDINA (MEX) 10 GKO7
    35 MAR 17 USA JAVIER AYALA (MEX) 10 GDU
    36 ABR 14 PANAMA GERARDO FERRAT (MEX) 10 GKO2
    37 JUN 02 PANAMA HECTOR THOMPSON (AUS) 15 GKO8
    PELEA POR EL TITULO MUNDIAL LIGERO AMB
    38 AGO 04 P. RICO DON MCCLENDON (USA) 10 GDU
    39 SEP 08 PANAMA ITSHIMATZU SUZUKI (JAP) 15 GKO10
    PELEA POR EL TITULO MUNDIAL LIGERO AMB
    40 DIC 01 VERAGUAS TONNY GARCIA (PR) 10 GKO4

    1974
    41 ENE 21 FRANCIA LEONARD TAVARES (FRA) 10 GKOT4
    42 FEB 16 PANAMA ARMANDO MENDOZA (COL) 10 GKO3
    43 MAR 16 PANAMA ESTEBAN DE JESUS (PR) 15 GKO11
    PELEA POR EL TITULO MUNDIAL LIGERO AMB
    44 JUL 06 PANAMA FLASH GALLEGO (FIL) 10 GKOT5
    45 SEP 01 P. RICO HECTOR MATA (PR) 10 GDU
    46 OCT 31 C. RICA JOSE VASQUEZ (CR) 10 GKO2
    47 NOV 16 PANAMA ADALBERTO VANEGAS (COL) 10 GKO1
    48 DIC 21 C. RICA MASATAKA TAKAYAMA (JAP) 15 GKOT1
    PELEA POR EL TITULO MUNDIAL LIGERO AMB

    1975
    49 FEB 15 PANAMA ANDRES SALGADO (COL) 10 GKO1
    50 MAR 02 PANAMA REY LAMPKIN (USA) 15 GKO14
    PELEA POR EL TITULO MUNDIAL LIGERO AMB
    51 JUN 03 USA JOSE PETTERSON (USA) 10 GKO1
    52 AGO 02 NICARAGUA PEDRO MENDOZA (NIC) 10 GKO1
    53 SEP 13 HERRERA ALIRIO ACU•A (VEN) 10 GKO3
    54 SEP 30 USA EDWIN VIRUET (PR) 10 GDU
    55 DIC 20 P. RICO LEONCIO ORTIZ (MEX) 15 GKO15
    PELEA POR EL TITULO MUNDIAL LIGERO AMB

    1976
    56 MAY 04 USA SAUL MAMBY (PR) 10 GDU
    57 MAY 23 USA LOU BIZARRO (USA) 15 GKO14
    PELEA POR EL TITULO MUNDIAL LIGERO AMB
    58 JUL 31 PANAMA EMILIANO VILLA (COL) 10 GKOT7
    59 OCT 15 USA ALVARO ROJAS (CR) 15 GKO1
    PELEA POR EL TITULO MUNDIAL LIGERO AMB

    1977
    60 ENE 29 USA VILOMAR FERNANDEZ (PR) 15 GKO13
    PELEA POR EL TITULO MUNDIAL LIGERO AMB
    61 MAY 16 USA JAVIER MU•IZ (MEX) 10 GDU
    62 AGO 06 PANAMA BERNARDO DIAZ (COL) 10 GKO1
    63 SEP 17 USA EDWIN VIRUET (PR) 15 GDU
    PELEA POR EL TITULO MUNDIAL LIGERO AMB

    1978
    64 ENE 21 USA ESTEBAN DE JESUS (PR) 15 GKO12
    PELEA POR EL TITULO MUNDIAL LIGERO AMB
    PELEA POR EL TITULO MUNDIAL LIGERO CMB
    FEB 21 PANAMA RENUNCIA AL TITULO LIGERO AMB.
    65 ABR 27 USA ADOLFO VIRUET (PR) 10 GDU
    66 SEP 01 PANAMA EZEQUIEL OBANDO (CR) 10 GKO2
    67 DIC 08 USA MONROE BROOKS (USA) 10 GKO8
    1979
    68 ABR 08 USA JIMMY HEAIR (USA) 10 GDU
    69 JUN 02 USA CARLOS PALOMINO (MEX) 10 GDU
    70 SEP 28 USA CEFERINO GONZALEZ (FIL) 10 GDU

    1980
    71 ENE 13 USA JOSEPH NSUBUGA (AFR) 10 GKO4
    72 FEB 24 USA WELLINGTON WHEATLEY (USA) 10 GKO6
    73 JUN 20 CANADA SUGAR R. LEONARD (USA) 15 GDU
    PELEA POR EL TITULO MUNDIAL WELTER CMB
    74 NOV 25 USA SUGAR R. LEONARD (USA) 15 PKO8
    PELEA POR EL TITULO MUNDIAL SUPER WELTER CMB

    1981
    JUN 10 USA SIMON SMITH (PAN) EXHIBICION
    75 AGO 09 USA MIKE GONZALEZ (PR) 10 GDU
    76 SEP 26 USA LUIGI MINCHILLO (ITA) 10 GDU
    1982
    77 ENE 20 USA WILFREDO BENITEZ (PR) 15 PDU
    PELEA POR EL TITULO MUNDIAL WELTER CMB
    78 SEP 04 USA KIRKLAND LAING (USA) 10 PDU
    79 NOV 12 USA JIMMY BATTEN (USA) 10 GDU
    1983
    80 ENE 29 USA J. PIPINO CUEVAS (MEX) 10 GKO4
    81 JUN 16 USA DAVEY MOORE (USA) 15 GKO8
    PELEA POR EL TITULO MUNDIAL JR. MEDIANO AMB
    82 NOV 16 USA MARVIN HAGLER (USA) 15 PDU
    PELEA POR EL TITULO MUNDIAL MEDIANO AMB

    1984
    83 JUN 15 USA THOMAS HEARNS (USA) 15 PKOT2
    PELEA POR EL TITULO MUNDIAL SUPER WELTER CMB
    ES DESCONOCIDO POR EL TITULO JR. MEDIANO AMB

    1985
    INACTIVO

    1986
    84 ENE 31 PANAMA MANUEL ZAMBRANO (COL) 10 GKO2
    85 ABR 18 PANAMA JORGE SUERO (RP) 10 GKO2
    86 JUN 23 USA ROBBIE SIMS (USA) 10 PDU

    1987
    87 MAY 16 USA VICTOR CLAUDIO (USA) 10 GDU
    88 SEP 12 USA JUAN C. GIMENEZ (PAR) 10 GDU
    1988
    89 FEB 05 USA RICKY STACKHOUSE (USA) 10 GDU
    90 ABR 14 USA PAUL THORNE (USA) 10 GKOT6
    91 OCT 01 USA JEFF LANAS (USA) 10 GDU
    1989
    92 FEB 24 USA IRAN BARKLEY (USA) 12 GDU
    PELEA POR EL TITULO MUNDIAL MEDIANO CMB
    93 DIC 07 USA SUGAR R. LEONARD (USA) 12 PDU
    PELEA POR EL TITULO MUNDIAL SUPER MEDIANO CMB
    ENE 10 MEXICO EL CMB DESCONOCE EL TITULO MEDIANO CMB

    1990
    INACTIVO

    1991
    94 MAR 18 USA PAT LAWLOR (USA) 10 PKOT6

    1992
    95 SEP 30 USA TONY BIGLEN (USA) 10 GDU
    96 DIC 17 USA KEN HULSEY (USA) 10 GKO2

    1993
    97 JUN 29 USA JACQUES LEBLANC (IRL) 10 GDU
    98 AGO 19 USA SEAN FITZGERALD (USA) 10 GKO6
    99 DIC 14 USA TONY MENEFEE (USA) 10 GKO8

    1994
    100 22-Feb FRANCIA CARLOS MONTERO (FRA) 10 GDECU
    101 29-Mar USA TERRY THOMAS (USA) 10 GKOT4
    102 25-Jun USA VINNIE PAZIENZA (USA) 12 PDECU
    103 10-Oct USA HEAT TODD (USA) 10 GKOT6

    1995
    104 14-Jan USA VINNIE PAZIENZA (USA) 12 PDECU
    105 10-Jun USA RONNIE MARTINEZ (USA) 10 GKOT7
    106 21-Dec USA WILBUR BURST (USA) 10 GKOT4

    1996
    107 20-Feb USA RAY DOMENEGE (USA) 10 GKOT6
    108 22-Jun USA HECTOR CAMACHO (USA) 12 PDECUReport
    109 31-Aug PMA ARIEL CRUZ (MEX) 10 GKO1
    110 27-Sep USA MIKE CULVERT (USA) 10 GKOT6

    1997
    111 15-Feb ARG JORGE CASTRO (ARG) 10 PDECU
    112 14-Jun PAN JORGE CASTRO (ARG) 10 GDECU
    113 15-Nov SURAFRICA DAVE RATTFORD (IR) 8 GDECU

    1998
    114 31-Jan PMA FELIX HERNANDEZ (COL) 10 GDECU
    115 28-Aug USA WILLIAM JOPPY 12 PKOT3 Report
    29 Aug announces retirement

    1999
    116 6-Mar ARG OMAR GONZALEZ (ARG) 10 PDECU
    2000
    117 16-Jun PMA PAT PAWLOR (USA) 12 GDECU
    118 12-Aug USA PATRICK J. GOOSSEN 10 GDECU Report



    PR PG PGKO PGDEC PP PPERDKO EMP
    119 103 70 33 15 4 0




    16 Oct Panama City, Panama KO7

    1972
    15 Jan Angel "Robinson" Garcia Panama City, Panama W10
    10 Mar Francisco Munoz Panama City, Panama KO1
    26 Jun Ken Buchanan New York KO13
    (Won World Lightweight Title)
    2 Sep Greg Potter Panama City, Panama KO1
    29 Oct Lupe Ramirez Panama City, Panama KO1
    17 Nov Esteban De Jesus New York L10

    1973
    20 Jan Jimmy Robertson Panama City, Panama KO5
    (Retained World & WBA Lightweight Title)
    23 Feb Juan Medina California KO7
    17 Mar Javier Ayala California W10
    14 Apr Gerardo Ferrat Panama City, Panama KO2
    2 Jun Hector Thompson Panama City, Panama KO8
    (Retained World & WBA Lightweight Title)
    4 Aug Doc McClendon Puerto Rico W10
    8 Sep Ishimatsu Suzuki Panama City, Panama KO10
    (Retained World & WBA Lightweight Title)
    1 Dec Tony Garcia Santiago, Puerto Rico KO2

    1974
    21 Jan Leonardo Alvarez France KO4
    16 Feb Armando Mendoza Panama City, Panama KO3
    16 Mar Esteban De Jesus Panama City, Panama KO11
    (Retained World Lightweight Title)
    6 Jul Flash Gallego Panama City, Panama KO5
    2 Sep Hector Matta Puerto Rico W10
    31 Oct Jose Vasquez Costa Rica KO2
    16 Nov Adalberto Vanegas Panama City, Panama KO1
    21 Dec Masataka Takayama Costa Rica KO1
    (Retained World Lightweight Title)

    1975
    15 Feb Andres Salgado Panama City, Panama KO1
    2 Mar Ray Lampkin Panama City, Panama KO14
    (Retained World Lightweight Title)

    3 Jun Jose Peterson Florida KO1
    2 Aug Pedro Mendoza Nicaragua KO1
    13 Sep Alirio Acuna Panama KO3
    30 Sep Edwin Viruet New York W10
    14 Dec Leoncio Ortiz Puerto Rico KO15
    (Retained World Lightweight Title)

    1976
    4 May Saoul Mamby Florida W10
    22 May Lou Bizzarro Pennsylvania KO14
    (Retained World Lightweight Title)
    31 Jul Emiliano Villa Panama City, Panama KO7
    15 Oct Alvaro Rojas Florida KO1
    (Retained World Lightweight Title)

    1977
    29 Jan Vilomar Fernandez Florida KO13
    (Retained World Lightweight Title)
    16 May Javier Muniz Maryland W10
    6 Aug Bernardo Diaz Panama City, Panama KO1
    17 Sep Edwin Viruet Pennsylvania W15
    (Retained World Lightweight Title)

    1978
    21 Jan Esteban De Jesus Las Vegas, NV KO12
    (Retained World Lightweight Title)
    27 Apr Adolfo Viruet New York W10
    1 Sep Ezequiel Obando Panama City, Panama KO2
    8 Dec Monroe Brooks New York KO8

    1979
    1 Feb Duran gives up World Lightweight Title
    8 Apr Jimmy Heair Las Vegas, NV W10
    22 Jun Carlos Palomino New York, NY W10
    28 Sep Zeferino Gonzalez Las Vegas, NV W10

    1980
    13 Jan Josef Nsubuga Las Vegas, NV KO4
    24 Feb Wellington Wheatley Las Vegas, NV KO6
    20 Jun Ray Leonard Montreal, Canada W15
    (Won World & WBC Welterweight Title)
    25 Nov Ray Leonard Louisiana LT 8
    (Lost World & WBC Welterweight Title)

    1981
    10 Jun Simon Smith New York, NY Exh 3
    9 Aug Nino Gonzalez Ohio W10
    26 Sep Luigi Minchillo Las Vegas, NV W10

    1982
    30 Jan Wilfredo Benitez Las Vegas, NV L15
    (For WBC Junior Middleweight Title)
    4 Sep Kirkland Laing Michigan L10
    12 Nov James Batten Florida W10

    1983
    29 Jan Jose "Pipino" Cuevas California KO4
    16 Jun Davey Moore New York, NY KO8
    (Won WBA Junior Middleweight Title)
    10 Nov Marvelous Marvin Hagler Las Vegas, NV L15
    (For World Middleweight Title)

    1984
    15 Jun Thomas "Hitman" Hearns Las Vegas, NV LK 2
    (For WBC Junior Middleweight Title)

    1986
    31 Jan Manuel Zambrano Panama KO2
    18 Apr Jorge Suero Panama KO2
    23 Jun Robbie Sims Nevada L10

    1987
    16 May Victor Claudio Florida W10
    12 Sep Juan Carlos Jimenez Florida W10

    1988
    5 Feb Ricky Stackhouse New Jersey W10
    14 Apr Paul Thorne New Jersey KO6
    1 Oct Jeff Lanas Illinois W10

    1989
    24 Feb Iran Barkley New Jersey W12
    (Won WBC Middleweight Title)
    7 Dec Ray Leonard Nevada L12
    (For WBC Super Middleweight Title)

    1991
    18 Mar Pat Lawlor Nevada LT 6

    1992
    -- Apr Masakatsu Funaki Tokyo Exh L 3
    (Above was boxer-wrestler exhibition)
    30 Sep Tony Biglen New York W10
    17 Dec Ken Hulsey Ohio KO1

    1993
    29 Jun Jacques LeBlanc Mississippi W10
    17 Aug Sean Fitzgerald Mississippi KO6
    14 Dec Tony Menefee Mississippi KO8

    1994
    22 Feb Carlso Montero France W10
    29 Mar Terry Thomas Mississippi KO4
    25 Jun Vinny Pazienza Nevada L12
    18 Oct Heath Todd Mississippi KO6

    1995
    14 Jan Vinny Pazienza New Jersey L12
    (For IBC Middleweight Title)
    10 Jun Ron Martinez Missouri KO7
    21 Dec Wilbur Garst Florida KO4

    1996
    20 Feb Ray Domenge Miami, FL W10
    22 Jun Hector Camacho New Jersey L12 Report
    (For IBC Middleweight title)

  3. #3
    mike
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    Re: SUDDENLY ONE SUMMER: THE RUSH OF GREATNESS THAT WAS ROBERTO DURAN by MIKE CASEY

    boy do i ever wish i had the films of that fight.excellant article as usual.

  4. #4
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    Re: SUDDENLY ONE SUMMER: THE RUSH OF GREATNESS THAT WAS ROBERTO DURAN by MIKE CASEY

    Mike it's on Classic Sports about ten times a year...

  5. #5
    mike
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    Re: SUDDENLY ONE SUMMER: THE RUSH OF GREATNESS THAT WAS ROBERTO DURAN by MIKE CASEY

    thank you,he grant, for the information.much appreciated.

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    Re: SUDDENLY ONE SUMMER: THE RUSH OF GREATNESS THAT WAS ROBERTO DURAN by MIKE CASEY

    Good article... I rate Duran the best I've seen pound for pound during my lifetime... his lightweight career alone puts him amongst the alltimers. Then to do what he did in the higher weights, despite the controversies and often hot-and-cold performances of his 80s career... that takes him even higher in the pound for pound ranks. For me his greatest achievment was winning the middleweight title against Barkley at 37... amazing performance....

  7. #7
    mike
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    Re: SUDDENLY ONE SUMMER: THE RUSH OF GREATNESS THAT WAS ROBERTO DURAN by MIKE CASEY

    above- good post.

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    Re: SUDDENLY ONE SUMMER: THE RUSH OF GREATNESS THAT WAS ROBERTO DURAN by MIKE CASEY

    My favourite early Duran fight is the one against Hector Thompson.

    That was a tough stylistic matchup for the young Roberto and he adapted very well, fighting off the back foot for much of the fight and using lateral movement and quick in-and-out attacks to solve the puzzle presented by the extremely strong Aussie.

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