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Thread: Boxing Writers

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    Boxing Writers

    Two questions:

    1. In your opinion, who were the best boxing writers from 1895 to 1910, and for which papers did they write?

    2. The names and newspapers of boxing writers who covered the Johnson-Jeffries fight?

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    Re: Boxing Writers

    Hype IGOE

    The Lowell Sun Thursday February 15 1945

    Damon Runyon

    Hype Igoe, the sports writer who died the other day, retained
    the quality of youth more than any man of matu r e years I
    have ever known. He was a little boy all his
    life. He just simply refused to get old in spirit, t h o u g h
    physically time b e l t e d him around pretty severely in his
    later years. ,

    A few years ago he was in ahospital when he got to reflecting
    that his old pal Runyon was a great lover of coffee but had probably been deprived of all these years of a brew that came from a most special percolator of hisknowledge

    So Hype put on his clothes and left his sick ward and
    hunted up one of those perks and came to my house and established it in the living room. The damn thing blew up right
    away and scared me stiff. Hype was rather amused on the
    whole and he promised to return
    another day and fix me up properly in the Java department.
    I never saw him again.

    In the period just prior to World War I, Hype, a dapper little man with blue-black hair and as jaunty as a cock robin, was one of the best known men-abouttables
    on Broadway. With Benny Bennett, Ike Dorgan and a chap
    who was stage manager of the Follies, he had bachelor quarters in West 45th off Sixth avenue
    called "The Flea Bag," the first
    time I ever heard that title incidentally
    He hung: out in Jack's restaurant
    which Hype called
    "Jack's AtMetic Club" or "Jack's A. C." for short, because
    of the way the waiters dusted belligerent customers
    around. Hype played the ukelele and he liked to gather
    some of the waiters around him and perhaps a few of the
    customers, too, to sing: as he played, a practice which
    caused, Jack Dunstan, the proprietor, great anguish as it
    would slow down the trade. So they took to frisking Hype when he entered and confiscating the uke and putting it in the ice box which caused the strings toshrink and rum the tone. The only time Jack would stand for
    the uke was when he himself was in mellow mood. Then he would demand that Hype accompany
    him to a secluded table in the back room and play Irish lullabies
    for him. Hype had a mild reedy little voice, and would sometimes sing for Jack who would shed
    tears and press money on the troubadour. But the next night he would glom the uke.

    One of Hype's pals was the celebrated Wilson Mizner.
    When the great middleweight Stanley Ketchcl, always Hype's
    fighting ideal, first came to New York, Hype had some
    kind of managerial claim on ' him. He took Ketch to Philadelphia
    for a fight and returning was sitting in a Pullman drawing
    room with a table before him when in came Ketchel and
    threw the two six-pistols he loved to carry in front of
    Hype.
    "I want to talk a little business to you Hype," he said. "I think I
    prefer having Wilson Mizner manage me from now on."
    "That's fine," said Hype, eyeing the guns, and that was the way it was until Ketchell got shot and killed by a jealous husband down in Missouri.

    Hype was generally as meek as a lamb but one time he got sore at Jack Dustan for something and
    pegged a glass sugar bowl at the bomface, barely missing old Jack's sconce. The dent on the wall where the sugar bowl landed was exhibited for years afterwards. On
    another occasion, Jack in turn got peeved at Hype and grabbing Hype by the lapels butted him between
    the eyes, a good old trick from the New York docks.
    The butt broke Hype's note and he sued Jack for damages,
    though nothing: ever came of the matter, as I re member.
    Jack was sorry afterwards and so was Hype. He
    was not one to carry a grudge and besides I think Hype
    rather admired Jack's technique.

    Those were the days in Jack's of Frank Ward O'Malley,
    Benjamin Decasseres, Spanish Jack O'Brien, Jack
    Francis, "Tad," Bud Fisher, Vernie Barton, Corse Peyton
    and a host of other sporting, theatrical and journalistic
    celebrities and Hype was not infrequently the life of not
    one but all parties.

    The legends of him would fill a book At about that period he
    and "Tad" were nearly always together and Hype was still more
    of a cartoonist than the boxing writer He finally came to write
    the most interesting and colorful tales of boxing"-since Pierce Egan, the Irishman who was the historian of the London prize ring over 200 years ago but whose furbishment
    of fistic fact has never been surpassed.

    Hype was ghosting" for Jack Kearns for a newspaper
    syndicate before the Dempsey- Tunney fight m Philadelphia,
    uhich nas not long after the great bust-up between the
    once pugilistic Damon and Pythias, and bitter feeling still
    prevailed between Dempsey and Kearns. On the night before
    the fight when Kearns was supposed to pick the winner
    for the morning papers, Ghost Igoe could not locate
    him. But feeling certain Kearns' hatred of Dempsey
    would permit nothing else, Hype cheerfully picked Tunney
    under Kearns' name. The following morning Kearns
    sent for me and I found him walking the floor of his apartment at the Ritz-Carlton in Philly white with rage, the morning Wats spread out on the floor, his prophecy in
    heavy type and very prominent. 'Tm going to kill Igoe,"
    Kearns frothed. "I will kill him with my two hand*. He
    has made me the laughing stock of the country with this
    ridiculous (election." I pointed out there was nothing
    he could do then and Kearns suddenly turned on me and demanded :
    "Can this Tunney fight a lick on earth?"
    "Why, yes," I said, "He can fight some."
    "Then Igoe is right," Kearns shouted. "Tunney will win."

    When I went downstairs I picked up a paper that had Hype's own by-line over his personal prediction and noticed he said Dempsey would
    win?
    Last edited by iskigoe; 06-09-2006 at 10:08 AM.

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    Re: Boxing Writers

    W.W. Naughton of the San Francisco Examiner would be one of the prominent boxing writers of that time period who covered the fight extensively.

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    Re: Boxing Writers

    TRENTON EVENING TIMES, WEDNESDAY. MARCH 11 1914.

    BILL NAUGHTON
    DEAN, DIES IN FRISCO
    SAN' FRANCISCO. Mar. 11. W. W. ('"Bill"). Naughton, president of the San Francisco Press Club, dean of Pacific coast sporting writers, and known the breadth of the country for, his boxing articles.- died yesterday at his home from heart disease, after an Illness of a fortnigrht.

    Naughton was born in Auckland N. Z,; July 31, 1834. and. began his career
    as an American newspaper writer in 1888 in San Francisco. He learned the
    newspaper business from the printer's case up. beginning on the New Zealand
    Herald in 1870.

    In' his youth he was notable as a boxer, oarsman, runner, swimmer and
    marksman, and it was not uncommon for him to win an athletic or shooting
    match in. the morning, write it up at noon,- and put his own story into type
    during the afternoon.

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    Re: Boxing Writers

    Some of the boxing writers mentioned in chapter 26 of the Fleischer book '50 Years at Ringside' included: Tad Dorgan, Damon Runyon, Bill McGeehan, Ed Smith, Charley Van Loan, Hugh Fullerton, George Siler, Bat Masterson, Charley Mathison, Sam Austin, George Touhey, Arthur Lumley, Joe Vila, Harry Weldon, Joe McGinn, Harry Smith, Joe Williams, Daniel Daniel, Lester Bromberg, Frank Graham, Bill Corum, Red Smith, Royal Brougham, Jack Kofoed,...way too many to list.

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    Re: Boxing Writers

    From what I gather, Harry B. Smith was a sportswriter for the San
    Francisco Chronicle from about 1905 to his death in 1951. For
    a few decades, he also was the sports editor of the Chronicle.
    During his entire tenure at the Chronicle, he covered many of
    the local cards staged in the Bay Area and a lot of the
    important bouts taking place in every part of the United
    States. Before being employed at the Chronicle, Smith
    worked for the Portland Oregonian.

    - Chuck Johnston

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    Re: Boxing Writers

    Thought I'd attempt to return this thread to life, listing some famous boxing writers of old.

    Otto Clement Floto (1863-1929) was regarded the dean of sports writers. Was the sporting editor of Denver Post from around 1898 until 1920s. Had seen most heavyweight championship fights during 1880-1920s. He tutored Damon Runyon, Charles E. Van Loan, Gene Fowler (who were all members of his staff at one time or another). As he was friendly with many American sporting writers, the Denver Post was regularly re-printing boxing articles by W.W. Naughton (SF Examiner), TAD Dorgan (NY American), Hype Igoe (NY Evening Journal), H.M. Walker (Los Angeles Examiner), George Siler (Chicago Tribune), Ed W. Smith (Chicago American), Malachy Hogan (Chicago Times-Herald), Bill Blunt (NY writer), Robert Edgren (NY Evening World), etc.

    His brother William was the sporting editor of Butte Intermountain.

    Upon Floto's death Damon Runyon mentioned several old-time sporting writers whom he considered most respectable - Bill Naughton, Paul Armstrong (Right Cross), Harry Weldon, Macon McCormick, Howard Hackett, O.P. Caylor, Sandy Griswold, Rob Roy Benton, Bat Masterson, H.E. Keough (HEK). Of those who were still alive, who were comparable to them, he mentioned Charles Mathison and Arthur Lumley.

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    Re: Boxing Writers

    William Walter (W. W.) Naughton (1854-1914) was another dean of American sporting writers and an authority of world-wide distinction, who specialized on boxing. In 1886, upon his arrival to US from New Zealand, he joined the staff of San Francisco Chronicle, and a year later his reports of Sullivan-Ryan and Dempsey-Burke bouts were so good that he was considered one of the best sporting writers of the West. In 1888, after a trip to Australia and NZ, he joined the staff of Hearst's San Francisco Examiner. Next year he moved to Chicago and became the sporting editor of Chicago American, which position he held until 1901, when he returned to SF Examiner. His name was the most recognized of all writers who covered boxing on the West coast during those years.

    Naughton wrote a book "Kings of the Queensberry Realm".

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    Re: Boxing Writers

    John B. (Macon) McCormick (1850-1903) was a famous sporting and theatrical writer. He founded the sporting department in Cincinnati Enquirer and for about 20 years was the sporting editor/writer for that newspaper. He was responsible for bringing out John L. Durling later years he wrote for New York newspapers, his weekly newsletters were re-printed all around the US. For example, see St. Louis Republic, which printed it for several years on Sundays.

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    Re: Boxing Writers

    Horace Michael (Harry) Weldon (1855-1902) was a famous sporting writer, whose specialty were racing, baseball and boxing. After the retirement of Macon as the sporting editor of Cincinnati Enquirer in 1886 (I think) Weldon took that position and kept it until 1900, when he was stricken with paralysis (Ren Mulford became next sp. editor). He was acknowledged one of the foremost experts of boxing during late 19th century.

    Unfortunately, I don't have many write-ups by him to figure how good he was.

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    Re: Boxing Writers

    Edward H. McBride (1871-1914) was a famous sporting writer and a boxing referee. He was the sporting editor of Buffalo Enquirer for 18 years (replacing George Dietrich, who moved to Cleveland) until his death, under the pen name of "Hotspur".

    Another one of whom I don't have many write-ups.

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    Re: Boxing Writers

    Harry McEnerny. Joined New Orleans Daily Picayune staff in 1880's, and had a weekly column, first called "Bantam's Budget", and later "Mack's Melange".

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    Re: Boxing Writers

    George Siler (1846-1908), famous sporting writer, considered one of the best boxing referees in history.

    Born in New York, at the age of 18 Siler became a boxer and three years later turned pro. He boxed at Harry Hill's, during the time when there were Billy Edwards, Arthur Chambers, Dooney Harris, Siddons' Mouse, Mike Donovan, Steve Taylor, Mike Coburn, Johnny Clark, Billy Madden. He refereed his first bout in 1871. In 1883 (?) Siler and Billy Madden, lightweights, toured the US, meeting all comers, and from 1886 Siler taught sparring in Chicago, first at the West Side and then at the old Athenaeum. A letter he wrote to Mike Donovan on the effects of knockout was printed in Chicago Times, and his weekly letters were printed in that newspaper until he joined the sporting staff in 1888. Shortly before Sullivan-Corbett bout, Siler became the sporting editor of Chicago Globe. About two years later Siler started writing for Chicago Tribune, joining it on regular basis in June 1900.

    He had a heart attack when he was preparing to go by train to Milwaukee, to report on the Ketchel-Papke fight, on June 4, 1908, and died shortly after.

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    Re: Boxing Writers

    Samuel Gerard Vietz (Sandy) Griswold (1849-1929) was famous sporting writer, who covered boxing since 1889 Sullivan-Kilrain bout. Was the sporting editor of Omaha Bee. From mid-1898 (replacing Ray Eaton) until 1920s the sporting editor of Omaha World-Herald.

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    Re: Boxing Writers

    Peter Jay (P.J.) Donohue (1859-1894), sporting editor of New York World in 1880-1890, and New York Recorder from 1890 until his death. Together with James C. Kennedy, John B. Day and James Mutrie co-founded The Sporting Times (Boston, MA) newspaper in 1886. Was a respected boxing referee.

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    Re: Boxing Writers

    James (Jimmy) Whitfield (1854-1902), sporting editor of Kansas City (MO) Star, 1884-1902; also a boxing referee.

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    Re: Boxing Writers

    Joseph Elliott (1813-1895), started reporting sporting events (the turf, in particular) for the New York Herald around 1838, later becoming the sporting editor of the Herald, until around 1882; one of the pioneers of sporting reporting in the USA. Knew personally almost every American pugilist of note from 1840’s until early 1880’s. NY Herald had probably the best coverage of bareknuckle boxing in the USA during his time as the sporting editor, not only sending its own reporters to bouts, but re-printing prize fight reports taken from local newspapers where the bouts were held.

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    Re: Boxing Writers

    William E. Harding (1848-1897), sporting editor of National Police Gazette, and also of New York Daily News (from 1868 or 1872 until his death).

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    Re: Boxing Writers

    Does anybody, who used 1900-1910s New York City newspapers for research, know real names for boxing writers "Left Hook" (wrote for NY Morning Telegraph before Bat Masterson joined it) and "Cross Counter" (wrote for NY Press in 1910s)? Not to be confused with Paul "Right Cross" Armstrong from NY Journal, though.
    Last edited by Senya13; 07-10-2012 at 12:04 AM.

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    Re: Boxing Writers

    Naughton was a good writer, but occasionally suffered from credibility problems. Sadly, often the best, most colorful writers are also associated with taking liberties with the truth.

    Tad of the New York Journal was well respected, and considered to be fair to black fighters.

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    Re: Boxing Writers

    Adam: I respect your judgment, but wish you would have provided some specifics. Yes, Naughton was partial to fighters from the Antipodes, but I wouldn't have expected otherwise considering that he was from New Zealand. To my knowledge, his pen wasn't for sale, unlike many of his contemporaries. To my way of thinking, the most influential American boxing writer of the 20th century was Robert Edgren. Shameless plug: In my new book, I have a chapter on boxing-oriented sportswriters and sports cartoonists who honed their skills in San Francisco. Short chapter, but what an impressive list -- Edgren, the Dorgan brothers, Igoe, McGeehan, Goldberg, Ripley, and more. The Bay Area was quite the fertile incubator for boxing writers. Perhaps it was something in the water.

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    Re: Boxing Writers

    Boxing was big in San Francisco. Hearst had deep pockets and hired the best writers for his newspapers. Naughton pulled some b.s. when he claimed that Jeffries-Fitzsimmons II was fixed. I discuss it in the Jeffries book.

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    Re: Boxing Writers


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    Re: Boxing Writers

    Does anybody know real names or at least the newspapers they wrote for for "Monty" and "Ringside", they wrote from New York in mid-1910s?

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    Re: Boxing Writers

    Quote Originally Posted by Senya13 View Post
    Does anybody, who used 1900-1910s New York City newspapers for research, know real names for boxing writers ... "Cross Counter" (wrote for NY Press in 1910s)?
    I researched him further and he seems to be Charles F. Mathison, who started writing boxing in 1890s, and sports in general even earlier than that (sports editor of Detroit Free Press from 1884).

    The other one, Ringside, wrote as Ringside Regan for NY Evening Mail, it seems, although I still don't know his real name.

    Anybody can help? I haven't seen a single issue of Evening Mail, or clippings from it. Was there a writer under that name in 1914-1917?

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    Re: Boxing Writers

    This link on Google news: http://tinyurl.com/c86x2sd suggests that "Ringside Regan" might be either Grantland Rice or Rube Goldberg (? - I've never heard of the latter before). For $3.95 you could find out for sure!

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    Re: Boxing Writers

    Thanks for the link. So it was Fred Wenck writing on boxing under that pseudonym.

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    Boxing Writers

    The Boxing Writers Association of America (BWAA) was originally formed in 1926 as the Boxing Writers Association of Greater New York.

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    Re: Boxing Writers

    One of the most unique styles of sporting writing I've read was that of Bill McGeehan.

    Born William O'Connell McGeehan, San Francisco, November 22, 1879.
    Died November 29, 1933, at Brunswick, GA.
    He wrote sports for San Francisco Call, San Francisco Chronicle, San Francisco Examiner, New York Evening Journal (using syndicated pseudonym 'Right Cross'), New York Tribune, New York Herald, New York Herald-Tribune.

    A couple of examples of his write-ups:

    1908-01-02 San Francisco Chronicle (San Francisco, CA) (page 8)
    NOT A PEEP AT JEFF'S DECISION
    --------
    "Awlfred" Wicks Says That His Fighter Is an Irishman.
    --------

    By W. O. M'GEEHAN.
    There wasn't a peep from the multitude yesterday when James Jeffries declared the Moran-Attell go a draw. Even the short-enders who had as much as $2.50 on the bout lost their voices when the decision was given. Moran might have had the slightest fraction of a shade but it took a microscope to see it.
    However, and nevertheless, the next time those boys get together, one Owen Moran is going to take that title back to England or rather Ireland. The mystery of Owen's nationality deepens and Awlfred Wicks is the cause. Somebody called from the bleachers yesterday, "Is he Irish?" Awlfred rumbled his intellect with his right mitt and replied, "If being Hoirish means 'E's a fighter, 'E's jolly well Hoirish." And so it turned out.
    Attell did a little scene from Shylock before the battle. It seems that Moran, through a discrepancy of scales, weighed probably an ounce over when he stepped upon the official weighing machine. Abie insisted on his ounce of flesh and almost stopped the fight. He finally compromised on Moran paying him $250 extortion money.
    Us and Gwendolen were seated in the Moran corner beside that philosopher and statesman, Mr. J. Awlfred Wicks of Lunnon. His vocabulary is a little shy, but what there is of it is great. Can you beat these in the jest book?
    "Soak 'im, Howen. That 's a blew." "'It 'im on the blooming dial." "Righto, Howney."
    Spider Kelly at his best never sprung anything like that and it is certainly a few better than any oratory emitted by T. Clarence McGrath. The funny part of it is that Moran seemed to understand it without the aid of an interpreter. Awlfred took off eight pounds wielding the towel between acts.
    "'Is majesty, Gawd bless 'im, his much hinterested in this go," declared Mr. Wicks. "If Howen wins, 'E 's jolly well likely to make us knights."
    If anything like that ever happens to Awlfred, he is going to have his cauliflower ear mounted and put it on his coat of arms.
    James Jeffries, whom William Walrus Jordan introduced as the only undefeated and retired champion, looked like an elephant in a monkey cage. When he moved that bulk around the ring he loomed up like Mount Tamalpais doing a waltz. Judging from his tonnage, a good match for him, if he ever decides to enter the ring again, would be a go with Monarch, the Golden Gate Park grizzly bear. Some one in the bleachers suggested to Jeff that he lie down and let the people see the fight.
    Jeff is still addicted to modesty, which is a trait that some pugilists we might mention could acquire without injuring their reputations. When Jordan began to extol his virtues in a lengthy speech, Jeff growled, "Aw, cut out the bull, Billy."
    Jim Neil, father of Frankie, was not afflicted with a retiring disposition at any time of his life. He was introduced also, and was about to make a speech when the multitude implored him to desist. History loses much by this, for Father Neil was full of eloquence, and was prepared with eloquence that would have made Dr. O'Donnell and Garibaldi Flynn speechless with envy. If Jim had made any New Year's resolution to quit crabbing he broke it yesterday.
    While the New Year's spirit is still in the air and our hammers are laid away, Us and Gwendolyn want to hand it to J. Promotion Coffroth for his nice little tent. We were in a tent once that---- Well, we'll forget that; it's the new year.
    It is an easy thing to hold a postmortem on one of these affairs, but there are many who think that if Moran had waded in sooner and kept at it, that he would have put over a haymaker. But the weight was no easy matter for Owen, and if he had heeded the volunteer coaches he would probably have worn himself out. He was none too lively at the finish, at that. Running about eighty miles the day of the battle and then going through a ringer to make weight doesn't make any fighter very strong.
    Well, anyhow, Moran is Irish. Awlfred Wicks admits it.


    1908-04-01 San Francisco Chronicle (San Francisco, CA) (page 9)
    BATTLING NELSON NEAR TO BEING BATTERED
    --------
    "Hardest Nut in the Profession" Is Becoming Much Softer.
    --------

    By W. O. M'GEEHAN.
    Battling Nelson came within one round of being Battered Nelson at the Coliseum last night. Up to that point Attell was doing what Gans did at Goldfield--chipping the corners from the Dane's think tank. A little more steam and there would be preparing the Nelson vault at Hegewich for an inmate. Until the fourteenth the little fellow was meeting the Battler in fierce rallies. Then he seemed to tire and was much to the bad when the round ended.
    For a wonder the Battler did not crab on the decision. The multitude was divided according to the way their money was bet; consequently Eddie Smith's ruling was the only one that could be put over. One thing was proved to a certainty--that "the hardest nut in the profession to crack" is becoming softer as time goes on. It will be cracked to the queen's taste one of these days, and without the aid of a sledge hammer at that.
    S. Haberdasher Berger's pavilion, where the show was staged, has certainly the class. Samuel's debut into the promotion game was the most successful society event of the season. He wore a special creation in the shape of a sea-green necktie for the occasion.
    Among those present at the ring side were Packey McFarland and Brooklyn Tommy Sullivan. Sullivan is the bright young lad who wanted to lick the whole Attell family in one afternoon. Not discouraging the young man, but this would certainly be a day's work. Packey modestly declared that the show was a revelation to him, but under his hat he was convinced that Nelson would be the duck soup portion of the bill of fare for him.
    Sailor Gordon and Soldier Houck tangled for the honor of the Army and Navy. The soldier had a motion like a land crab with the gout, and led only once. Then he missed. For a while his mysterious movements seemed to puzzle the mariner, but finally the sailor let go a sixteen-inch shell that caught the soldier under the figurehead and he sank beneath the waves. The hospital corps from the Presidio rushed into the ring with first aid to the injured, but Houck was like the soldier of the Legion who lay dying at Algiers at this point. They ought to put some flowers on his grave on Decoration day, though, for staying as long as he did.
    The preliminaries ought to be abbreviated as much as possible. No fight crowd wants to see a pair of brows maul and stall when there is a real go coming. Four rounds of the rough stuff is enough even for a hog.
    It's a shame to think how much of the Presidio coin was annexed by the coffers of the fleet in the Army and Navy go. The boys in blue will be on a hard-tack-and-water diet for some time, while the sailor men in port will be dazzling the Rue de Fillmore with their wealth for days to come. Sailor Gordon, however, will not be a serious rival of James Jeffries or Tommy Burns. His main asset is a large storage capacity for provisions and liquids.
    A lot of side-show fights took place after the main event over the difference of opinion on the decision. But these are the sort of things that make the game and buy green neckties for promoters. Some people would disagree over the Cain and Abel fight if Cain hadn't made a knockout affair out of it. Eddie Smith gave the only decision that could be given.

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    Re: Boxing Writers

    And here's Tom Paddy Magilligan on the same bouts, similar in style to McGeehan, but not as concise and funny, IMHO.


    1908-04-01 Oakland Tribune (Oakland, CA) (page 9)
    CLEVER ABIE GIVES HARD BAT A MERRY TIME OF IT
    --------
    Champion Featherweight of the World Holds Crack Lightweight to a Well Drawn Fifteen-Round Battle.
    --------

    By T. P. MAGILLIGAN.

    Abie Attell proved himself to be a rather marvelous boy by traveling fifteen lively rounds to a draw with Battling Nelson at the Coliseum Ring in San Francisco last night.

    Much to the elation of Sammy Berger, a large crowd was present to witness the performance, and be it said in Mr. Berger's favor that he pulled the show off without a hitch or wrangle, something unusual with the San Francisco fight promoters.

    The battle was purely one of science against brawn. Attell had more science on tap than was ever shown at the Smithsonian Institute, while Nelson was as rugged and brave as a Hereford bull.

    At times Attell fought after the manner of Bill Nye fighting his brother.

    When Bill fought his brother he gave his brother plenty of room. Bill was not selfish, and didn't want to hog the fight, so when his brother landed on his jaw, Bill stopped the fight to remove the dresser so that his brother would have plenty of room for maneuvering and gun practice.

    Attell followed this plan admirably, and he gave Nelson most of the ring to do his work in. At that there were spots where Abie stood and slammed away with Bat, and he didn't have any the worst of the mixing. He shook the Battler up at different times, but he might as well have tried to stop the Danube river with a pretzel as to attempt to hold back the merciless Nelson.

    Usually Abie counts the house while he is fighting, so as not to lose a pfenning at the gate, but Mr. Nelson engaged Attell's attention so much and took up so much of Abie's valuable time, that the foxy feather missed several interested spectators, who paid their hard earned money at the barrier.

    In the early rounds, Attell made Nelson look like the hole in a doughnut. He hammered and battered Nelson freely about the ring, and some of the spectators thought he would clean the Dane, fore and aft. But Nelson was there with all the old time steam, energy and staying power, and the more he was stung, the better he seemed to like the going. In the eleventh round Nelson found his bearings, and he went after Attell like a wild man. He kept Attell dodging and ducking, and in the fourteenth round it looked as though he would settle the fast Abie.

    When it came to speed, Attell had all the better of Nelson. In this department of the game he had the Battler as badly beaten as the Thomas Flyer has it on the French and Italian cars. Abie moved around the ring in a pair of soft boxing gives, which he used as shoes, and the only time one could see him when he was moving rapidly was when he let go a rip which exploded and burst among the features of the craggy Dane. Abie's movements had more room than a Harlem flat.

    Attell wears a peculiar set of shoes, which hypnotizes his opponent, while he can roam at will in them. Attell's feet are a good deal like the mystic pea, hard to find. Abie after the battle usually arrays himself in a pair of calf skin battleships, which also have speed in making the distance from the dressing room to the box office.

    While Abie is fighting he wears a pair of light cruiser shoes built by Cramps. The idea of Abie's shoes is to give his feet plenty of breathing space, and to allow the toes to spread out like a Japanese fan so that he can step on any one of his toes and be at a different angle at a moment's warning.

    Most of Mr. Attell's success lies in these battleships, or high geared shoes. They resemble the rubber coin mat usually placed in front of a slot machine, and they can do as neat a disappearing act and gather the coin as rapidly as that valuable asset.

    Nelson is not geared for speed, but he is fashioned after the India rubber man in the side show and guaranteed not to explode every time he is punched.

    Bat scored heavily--on the atmosphere--a couple of times when Abie got scowing around in his cleverly constructed shoes.

    For ten rounds Abie had the better of the milling. Nelson was always coming and most of the time Attell painted a "welcome" on his map, same as they do on door matts. The only difference was that Abie used a well made five ounce boxing glove, made by Sol Levison, and guaranteed not to rip, even on the hardest substance, which scientists of the boxing game have discovered rests safely and solely in Mr. Nelson's make up.

    Smith's decision was the only proper one to give. Attell was the cleverer, but Nelson was the aggressor, so there you are.

    During the bout Spider Kelly showed all his old time nerve as a second. As a handler of fighters no man has a look in with the Spider, and to his clever handling Attell owes much of his good showing.

    In one of the preliminaries, Sailor Gordon of the navy knocked out Soldier Houck. Soldier Houck had the sailor's goat for a time, but finally the sailor exploded a submarine under the soldier and the fight terminated suddenly in the seventh spasm.

    Tim McGrath acted as advisory board to the navy. Early in the fight, Tim explained that the sailor was at a disadvantage, because the ring didn't oscillate like a battleship. Tim said that the sailor was the boxing instructor of the navy and needed a rocking motion to get his bearings. The sailor and soldier were both decorated for battle, and when they stripped for action the soldier displayed a trouseretted eagle on his chest tattooed in olive green, while the sailor wore an anchor on his mitt. After the fight the sailor's friends claim Sailor Gordon hit Soldier Houck with the decorated anchor, and that was the reason for the knockout.

    In the opening round the soldier slapped the sailor on the spinnaker jibbom and nearly bore him from his offings. The sailor grew real angry at this and began to puff and make a noise like a squall in the Mediterranean. The soldier thought he was in a maelstrom at sea when the sailor used these tactics and lost his ammunition wagon, so that he couldn't apply any high explosives, and after the squall business the soldier took the count of ten. They could still be counting and the sailor wouldn't be able to hear it. When the soldier awoke at 11:30 this morning he wanted to know if the Japs had won, which shows at least that he is a loyal subject of Uncle Sam (not Sammy Berger.)

    When the sailor landed the knockout he was going at a rate of forty knots an hour in a calm sea.


    'Tay Pay' at different times wrote for St. Louis Republic, Oakland Tribune, San Francisco Call, San Francisco Bulletin, Oakland Enquirer, San Jose Evening News. Don't know his birthday and when he died, but he was reported to be seriously ill in January 1942 at San Mateo county hospital.

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