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Thread: Jerry Quarry/the downward slide

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    Jerry Quarry/the downward slide

    I rember watching the segment on Jerry Quarry on the news show 20/20
    about 10 years ago,concerning Jerry Quarry's condition,which many if not most experts felt was caused by all the blows he took to the head over his long boxing career.
    Howevewr I rember the show inter viweing Bob Arum,whose opinion was that Jerry Quarry's condition was caused by being involved in many bar room brawls.
    I was just wondering if the public record shows how many times the police
    have had to respond to any of the reported brawls involving Jerry Quarry,and if he ever had to go to the hospital aftwerwards.
    Would this be public record?

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    Re: Jerry Quarry/the downward slide

    Also if nobody minds I would like to ask a related question. When did the fans and media start calling for Quarry to retire?

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    Re: Jerry Quarry/the downward slide

    Quote Originally Posted by brutu
    I rember watching the segment on Jerry Quarry on the news show 20/20
    about 10 years ago,concerning Jerry Quarry's condition,which many if not most experts felt was caused by all the blows he took to the head over his long boxing career.
    Howevewr I rember the show inter viweing Bob Arum,whose opinion was that Jerry Quarry's condition was caused by being involved in many bar room brawls.
    I was just wondering if the public record shows how many times the police
    have had to respond to any of the reported brawls involving Jerry Quarry,and if he ever had to go to the hospital aftwerwards.
    Would this be public record?
    Bar room brawls eh ? Yeah that sounds really plausible. He was damaged by drunks in bar fights, not by getting hammered by some of the toughest professional fighters to ever walk the planet. I have no idea why Arum would even propose such a theory but Quarry fought way way waaaaay past his prime and he paid the price. Happens all the time in boxing, why deny it ?

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    Re: Jerry Quarry/the downward slide

    Very sad story, Quarry made a short comeback in about '83 when he was about 38 and hadnt fought for about 6 years and there was concern for him because of all the wars he had had with Ali, Frazier, Norton etc... although at that point he seemed ok healthwise. Quarry had two fights at Cruierweight I belive and won both but was cut up badly and quit again. But he then was persuaded to have another fight in about 1990 when he was about 45 and took a pounding... its after this last fight as far as I can recall that Jerry became visibly unwell...
    Jerry just had too many hard fights, was often too brave for his own good and his final fights pushed him over the edge.
    People should remind Evander Holifield of Jerry when he talks about fighting again...

  5. #5
    Roberto Aqui
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    Re: Jerry Quarry/the downward slide

    Boxers don't usually live long lives. Neither do alcoholics. Quarry suffered from a lifetime of congenital boxing and alcoholism, a bad combination for longevity and health. Quarry was reckless in the way he used boxing and alcohol.

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    Re: Jerry Quarry/the downward slide

    i honestly don't think there was ever a barroom brawler that could have lasted long enough to give jerry quarry a headache much less brain damage.
    greg

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    Re: Jerry Quarry/the downward slide

    Yeah, the bar room brawling stuff is crap, can't believe Arum would say that!... then again I can!.
    A lot of boxers who have suffer health problems after their careers often have had substance abuse problems as well... drugs and drink perhaps accelerrate the damage caused by taking punches....

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    Re: Jerry Quarry - Sparring over 20 Years cant help either !

    I often feel people forget about the accumalted damage that may be caused by approx 20 years of Sparring - In Between the fights !

    Most fighters will fight every couple of months at best, certainly as they move up in class. so will have some recovery time in between actual fights, but a lot of that time will be filled with Day-in-Day-out Sparring, over the course of a long career i must belive that these Daily "Jolts" must amount to some detriment when aggregated over a long period, the effects of which may not actually make themselves know until furter down the road, Certainly these daily sparring "Jolts" will not do someone in their late 30's and into their 40's any actual good ( Apart perhaps as prep for fightnight itself when the leather will be flying for real ...so the lesser of two evils perhaps !?)

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    Re: Jerry Quarry - Sparring over 20 Years cant help either !

    Quote Originally Posted by SageBrush
    I often feel people forget about the accumalted damage that may be caused by approx 20 years of Sparring - In Between the fights !

    Most fighters will fight every couple of months at best, certainly as they move up in class. so will have some recovery time in between actual fights, but a lot of that time will be filled with Day-in-Day-out Sparring, over the course of a long career i must belive that these Daily "Jolts" must amount to some detriment when aggregated over a long period, the effects of which may not actually make themselves know until furter down the road, Certainly these daily sparring "Jolts" will not do someone in their late 30's and into their 40's any actual good ( Apart perhaps as prep for fightnight itself when the leather will be flying for real ...so the lesser of two evils perhaps !?)
    I seem to remember reading that Jerry used to have some vicious sparring sessions with his brother Mike... in many ways Jerry and his brother seem to have been pushed into fighting by their father who also used to get them to spar against eachother in very hard sessions...

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    Re: Jerry Quarry/the downward slide

    I thinked then and I continue to do so, that Jerry was pound for pound a great fighter. His LIFESTYLE caused him to have some stamina issues that when pitted against Frazier just drove him to defeat. Although he dealt with Ali even up the first time, the magic was too much for him the second time around. But then again Ali could do that to guys. But ANYONE else in the era, (Liston was before him I guess for the most part) Quarry could handle. I still say Foreman was made to order for the best Quarry. Big hard hitting slow guys were in for it with Jerry. What he couldnt handle was PACE. Still Jerry was one great heavy for his size.

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    Re: Jerry Quarry/the downward slide

    Jerry was a very emotional person and would often have problems outside the ring with his wives/girl friends etc... I think in some fights like Frazier 1, Ali 2 he went into the ring too wound up and fought the wrong fight, in other fights he was out of shape, but when he was right Jerry was one of the best... certainly could have been a champion in most other eras even with his inconsistancy...

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    Re: Jerry Quarry/the downward slide

    Quote Originally Posted by KOJOE90
    Also if nobody minds I would like to ask a related question. When did the fans and media start calling for Quarry to retire?
    Joe:

    Jerry's career really spanned 10 years, from 1965 to 1975. The four matches he had after that, in 1977, 1983, and 1992, were isolated fights and shouldn't be thought of as an extension of Quarry's career.

    Nobody called for Quarry to retire during his first career, as he was still a top 10 contender when he retired in 1975. The feeling however was that after having been kayoed by Frazier (1974) and Norton (1975), that Quarry was burning out, and should he continue his career, he'd be regarded as a only a gatekeeper against hot, young prospects trying to break into the top 10.

    So, of course, when Quarry announced his retirement in March, 1975, everyone thought it was a sensible thing to do.

    Quarry's comeback in 1977 --for one fight-- was met with skepticism from the media and the public. The 1983 comeback, this time for two fights, was met with even more skepticism. The 1992 fight he had was not widely publicized, and few people knew about until it appeared in the magazines on the newstands several months later. Again, it struck people as insensible.

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    Re: Jerry Quarry/the downward slide

    Quote Originally Posted by fatcity
    Jerry was a very emotional person and would often have problems outside the ring with his wives/girl friends etc... I think in some fights like Frazier 1, Ali 2 he went into the ring too wound up and fought the wrong fight, in other fights he was out of shape, but when he was right Jerry was one of the best... certainly could have been a champion in most other eras even with his inconsistancy...
    I think you are right as far as Ali 2 goes but against Frazier the first time around I think Quarry used the right gameplan and really fought the only way he could if he was ever going to beat Joe. I know it is popular belief that Quarry should have boxed Joe from the outide but who was ever successful at boxing from the outside against Frazier ? Only Foreman with his brute strength kept Joe on the outside and Quarry did not have the physical tools of a George Foreman. When Ali could not keep Frazier off of him it is very unlikely that Quarry could do it.

    I think the reasoning behind Quarry's strategy in Frazier 1 was that Frazier was a slow starter that could be hurt early (as seen against Bonavena) and that Quarry who was a fast starter with good power should try to take advantage of this. The plan did'nt quite work out but Quarry gave Joe plenty of problems early. Had he fought from the outside I think he would have lost anyway and it would have been much easier for Frazier than was the case.

    As far as Jerry being an underachiever I also disagree. He had a very successful career but unfortunately he stayed on too long. With the exception of the fluke tko loss to Chuvalo he lost fair and square when he did loose and he lost only to the very best. If anything he was unlucky to fight in such a strong aera.

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    A Fantastic Story and a Sad Ending: Jerry Quarry Remembered

    By Dan Hernandez-August 2, 2007
    Ringside Report.com

    “Irish” Jerry Quarry was born on May 14, 1945, in Bakersfield, California. He fought professionally from 1965 until his ill-advised return at 47, in 1992. He absorbed a terrible beating. His outstanding boxing record was 53-9, 32 KO’s.

    Also known as the “Bellflower Belter,” he passed away on January 3, 1999, from pneumonia and cardiac arrest. Quarry had been suffering from Pugilistic Dementia, more commonly called “Punch Drunk,” a condition caused by repeated blows to the head, since being diagnosed in 1983. Having earned more than two million dollars in ring purses during the 1960’s and 1970’s, his last fight netted him only $1050.00. Three years later his income was $614.00 a month from Social Security. It was a very sad ending to such a glorious beginning.

    Setting a record that stands to this day, Jerry knocked out five straight opponents in 3 days to win the National Amateur Heavyweight Title in 1964; Jerry had been fighting as an amateur since he was a child. He turned professional in May of 1965 winning his first twenty encounters without defeat and only one draw. In an era of top heavyweight fighters Jerry was named Boxing Illustrated Magazine’s most popular professional boxer in the world in 1968, 1969, and shared the honor with Muhammad Ali in 1970.

    Although a top fighter during most of his career, Quarry had the misfortune to come up the boxing ladder when such luminaries as Muhammad Ali, Joe Frazier, and George Foreman ruled the division. Jerry said it himself, “Always the bridesmaid, never the bride.”

    He came close to reaching the championship status, losing a controversial majority decision to Jimmy Ellis, for the vacant heavyweight title in 1968. He fought everyone, defeating former 2-Time World Heavyweight Champion, Floyd Patterson, Mac Foster, Earnie Shavers, Tony Doyle, Brian London, Alex Miteff, Billy Daniels, and Thad Spencer among other top fighters of that time period.

    He was defeated twice by former World Heavyweight Champions: Muhammad Ali and Joe Frazier. One of the matches with “Smokin’ Joe” was voted the “Fight of the Year” of 1974.

    A memorable fight took place in Los Angeles December 15, 1966 between two local favorites, two friends. Joey Orbillo “The Harbor Hawk” versus "Irish" Jerry Quarry. Orbillo seemed to have won the first three rounds when in the 4th stanza he was hit by a tremendous left hook that caused Joey to do a complete somersault. Joey finished the bout, but has no memory of that night beyond the 4th round. Quarry won by a unanimous decision.

    Twenty -five years later, Jerry Quarry recalled being afraid of killing Orbillo after depositing him on the canvas. Jerry commented, “I could have knocked him out, but there was no way I wanted to do that because we were friends.” In the last part of the tenth round, “Irish” Jerry, lowered his hands and danced around the ring. He said later, “it was strictly that I didn’t want to hurt him anymore.”

    This bout was voted the “Fight of the Year” in 1966 by the sportswriters of Southern California.

    Just prior to the Orbillo-Quarry match, Joey had been inducted in the U.S. Army and completed basic training at Fort Benning, Georgia. In addition, he had volunteered to be a point man in the infantry’s 199th brigade. Jim Murray. A Pulitzer Prize winning columnist described what that entailed in a story he wrote about Orbillo. He wrote: “A point man is a soldier who goes out on point some 50 to 100 yards ahead of his company so that if he (a) steps on a mine, or (b) gets his throat cut, he will be the only one lost. The others will be forewarned. His life expectancy is symbolized by a decimal point.”

    Orbillo told Murray why he volunteered, “I figure, look, maybe the guy out on the point in my patrol is married. Or maybe he has a girlfriend. Or he’s got something on his mind, so he gets careless. Me, I’m not married, I got no girlfriend. I’m concentrating. Besides, I’m used to dealing with people looking, y’know, to hurt you.” The “Big Fight” took place a week before Joey was to ship out to Viet Nam.

    Joey says the beating he absorbed from Quarry, “saved my life, in a strange way.” Both of Joey’s eardrums were broken as a result of the fight and he was in the hospital while the soldier that replaced him on the very first jungle patrol, stepped on a land mine and perished. Jerry Quarry and Joey Orbillo remained life-long friends and a devastated Joey was a speaker at Jerry’s funeral.

    Jerry Quarry was jolted back to my memory by the recent death of his younger brother, Mike Quarry. Mike had an outstanding professional boxing record of 63-13-6, 17 KO’s, in a career spanning from 1969 through 1982. He fought as a light-heavyweight, even contending for the championship against the heavy hitting titleholder Bob Foster. He was knocked out in the fourth round in 1972. Mike was born on March 4, 1951, in Bakersfield, California and died in an assisted living facility, of pugilistic dementia on June 11, 2006.

    Among other top boxers that have been afflicted with this neurological disorder are: Jack Dempsey, Joe Louis, Emile Griffith, and “Sugar” Ray Robinson.

    It is a crying shame that the “sport” we love has so many casualties and that the amazing stories that these men tell with their fists can at times end so tragically and sadly.

    Jerry Quarry, Rest in Peace.

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    Re: Jerry Quarry/the downward slide

    Did Jack Dempsey suffer from any form of punch drunk syndrome? This is the first I ever heard of it.

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    Roberto Aqui
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    Re: Jerry Quarry/the downward slide

    The writer is mistaken about Dempsey from all that I have read. It's not unusual when a person enters an older, sicker stage of life to zone out. Dempsey was in his late 80s before he checked out. Sounds like someone started a rumor.

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    Re: Jerry Quarry/the downward slide

    I've caught a lot of Quarry's fights on tape through the years and it's clear he was a hell of a fighter but one level below Ali and Frazier .... however he had quite a few big wins through the years ... I was always disappointed by his loss to Norton because I feel he may have been a fighter a prime Quarry would have defeated ... Jerry took far too many hard blows through the years ... it ended very sadly for him ...

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    Re: Jerry Quarry/the downward slide

    Quote Originally Posted by HE Grant
    I've caught a lot of Quarry's fights on tape through the years and it's clear he was a hell of a fighter but one level below Ali and Frazier .... however he had quite a few big wins through the years ... I was always disappointed by his loss to Norton because I feel he may have been a fighter a prime Quarry would have defeated ... Jerry took far too many hard blows through the years ... it ended very sadly for him ...
    Jerry Quarry through the years.

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    Re: Jerry Quarry/the downward slide

    I like Jerry Quarry a lot. Class act, balls, guts, glory, and toughness. He fought the best, beat a lot of the best, but a few guys named Ali and Frazier kept him from being the heavyweight champ. I would take a Quarry today over anyone named Klitchsko. God bless and RIP Jerry Quarry.
    Last edited by sr71ko; 08-05-2007 at 11:38 AM.

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    A Tribute to Jerry Quarry


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    Jerry Quarry vs Alex Miteff...1967


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    Re: A Fantastic Story and a Sad Ending: Jerry Quarry Remembered

    Quote Originally Posted by kikibalt
    By Dan Hernandez-August 2, 2007
    Ringside Report.com

    Among other top boxers that have been afflicted with this neurological disorder are: Jack Dempsey, Joe Louis, Emile Griffith, and “Sugar” Ray Robinson.
    Mr. Hernandez needs to check his facts. Based on discussions I've had with folks who knew him, Jack Dempsey never suffered from dementia related to boxing. In his last few years after he restaurant finally closed, he didn't get out as much, lost his mental sharpness, and just simply became a senile old man - as many old people do when they can't maintain an active lifestyle.

    My granddad was senile when he died but, as far as I know, nobody ever hit him in the head with a boxing glove.

    Poor Dempsey!! All you people out there saying Marciano or Louis or Johnson would have taken him, and now this!!
    Last edited by raylawpc; 09-23-2007 at 01:42 PM.

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    Re: Jerry Quarry/the downward slide

    Regarding Jerry Quarry, he is one of the heavyweight greats of the 1960s and 1970s that I always wanted to meet, but never did.

    I met his brother Mike when Mike came to Oklahoma City to fight my friend Kelly Burden, and I worked Kelly's corner against him. Mike was a really, really nice fellow, and I was sorry to learn of his struggles with dementia and his recent passing.

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    Re: Jerry Quarry/the downward slide

    Quote Originally Posted by raylawpc
    Regarding Jerry Quarry, he is one of the heavyweight greats of the 1960s and 1970s that I always wanted to meet, but never did.

    I met his brother Mike when Mike came to Oklahoma City to fight my friend Kelly Burden, and I worked Kelly's corner against him. Mike was a really, really nice fellow, and I was sorry to learn of his struggles with dementia and his recent passing.
    What was your impression of Mike Quarry that night, stylistically and performance-wise? I've heard that Quarry was supposed to be strictly a boxer-counterpuncher with a flashy hook and decent foot movement. In the films I've seen him in, though, he appears to have a penchant for mixing it up on the inside.

    Just one month after the Burden fight, Quarry went to South Africa and came very, very close to defeating top-rated Pierre Fourie. Quarry actually floored Fourie once -- shocking, considering Mike's supposed lack of punching power -- and he had Fourie badly cut as well.

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    Re: Jerry Quarry/the downward slide

    Hi kenmore. Simply put, Quarry outboxed Kelly. It was a solid performance for Mike. I remember he moved well, had a good jab, and was a sharp puncher. I wasn't particularly impressed with Mike's power; I know he never hurt Kelly, although I think he cut him over the right eye. (Hard to remember, Kelly got cut alot.) It was a unanimous decision; but I don't remember the official scores. It was a good fight but Quarry won it.

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    Re: Jerry Quarry/the downward slide

    I still say Quarry should be in the hall of fame.

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    Re: Jerry Quarry/the downward slide

    You know, I may be a bit premature, but IMHO Jerry's last time in great shape and last great fight was Ron Lyle in early 73. He looked really chisled in that one and just looked textbook Jerry; then comes Shavers, a fight I still see as a bit of an anonmaly. Jerry came in sort of doughy and pear-shaped, a look he would continue to have the rest of his career (perhaps his out of ring problems had already started.) Then we move to early 74 (go to YouTube and watch his bout with journeyman Joe Alexander; he got blasted with a left hook in the first that literally lifted him off his feet and on his arse.)
    Then the Frazier massacre in June of that year followed by the Norton stoppage. I too think hall of famer but he fought on too long IMHO; just too many wars. Interesting that Jerry and Kenny were the same age when they fought but one was on the way up and the other on the way down.

  28. #28
    mike
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    Re: Jerry Quarry/the downward slide

    in his prime- quarry good, tough, hard fighting sob in the ring--hed make any and all heavy in history earn their paycheck and beats soo many.one dangerous ,tough, conditioned dude.

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    Re: Jerry Quarry/the downward slide

    Quote Originally Posted by brutu
    I rember watching the segment on Jerry Quarry on the news show 20/20
    about 10 years ago,concerning Jerry Quarry's condition...
    I believe that it was a piece on 48 Hours. I actually stumbled upon it yesterday on YouTube.

    It really is a heart breaking piece.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=StuiK5Kdv24

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    Re: Jerry Quarry/the downward slide

    Quarry's last fight is also on YouTube. It took place eighteen years ago yesterday. Given Quarry's condition in the 48 Hours piece, which would have been from 1995-96, it's staggering to think that he was boxing in late 1992.

    Jerry Quarry Vs Ron Cranmer (Friday, October 30, 1992) (Aurora, Colorado, United States)

    Part 1

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CIVVU1mnRT8

    Part 2

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EofeJT61RSY

    Part 3

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pVhvE5GWtfc

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