Home News Current Champs WAIL! Encyclopedia
The Cyber Boxing Zone Message Board
+ Reply to Thread
Page 5 of 11 FirstFirst 1234567891011 LastLast
Results 121 to 150 of 309

Thread: From The Phillyboxing Site

  1. #121
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    In the Barrio, In La Puente,Ca.
    Posts
    12,026
    vCash
    500

    From The Phillyboxing Site


  2. #122
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    In the Barrio, In La Puente,Ca.
    Posts
    12,026
    vCash
    500

    From The Phillyboxing Site

    WILLIE MONROE WAS BORN ON THIS DAY IN 1949. HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO THE WORM!!

    (Monroe shown on right with Curtis Parker)

    HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO
    THE WORM

    Willie "the Worm" Monroe was born on this day in 1949. In his day, he was a tall, top-notch middleweight who fought many top names, including his fellow Philly standouts. In '74 he beat Cyclone Hart, Kitten Hayward, & Dynamite Douglas before losing to Boogaloo Watts. He scored a pair of wins over tough Carlos Marks in '75. His career highlight came in 1976 - a 10-round drubbing of Marvin Hagler. The Worm fell to the curse of David Love, and in all posted a 40-10-1 record over 12 years.
    Last edited by kikibalt; 06-05-2007 at 09:53 PM.

  3. #123
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    In the Barrio, In La Puente,Ca.
    Posts
    12,026
    vCash
    500

    Joltin Jeff Chandler


  4. #124
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    In the Barrio, In La Puente,Ca.
    Posts
    12,026
    vCash
    500

    Harold Johnson...1966


  5. #125
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    In the Barrio, In La Puente,Ca.
    Posts
    12,026
    vCash
    500

    From The Phillyboxing Site


  6. #126
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    In the Barrio, In La Puente,Ca.
    Posts
    12,026
    vCash
    500

    From The Phillyboxing Site

    GEORGE GODFREY ENTERS BOXING HALL OF FAME

    On Sunday, June 10th, George Godfrey will be inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame in Canastota, NY. Godfrey was a popular and outstanding heavyweight who fought all the best fighters that he could get into the ring with him between 1919-1937. Unfor-tunately, many top white fighters avoided him. This well-deserved honor makes Godfrey the 18th Philadelphian to be inducted to the Hall of Fame. This web site will take the weekend off to attend all the festivities. Congrats to George!

  7. #127
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    In the Barrio, In La Puente,Ca.
    Posts
    12,026
    vCash
    500

    From The Phillyboxing Site

    PHILLY BOXING HISTORY



    Gypsy Joe, They Haven't Forgotten
    Campaign Under Way For Tombstone

    by Mark Kram
    (Philadelphia Daily News)


    NO TALE IN the forlorn annals of boxing ever topped the sorrowful story of Gypsy Joe Harris. For a shimmering blink of an eye in the 1960s, the wildly unorthodox and undisciplined Gypsy surged to the heights of the welterweight division, where he had the ingenuity of a scaled-down Ali. The crowds loved him and he played to them boldly both inside the ring and away from it, where he roamed the bars and pool halls of North Philadelphia sporting a cowboy hat or a Persian lamb collar. Scarcely the type to plan ahead, he never had a bank account, owned a house or held even an insurance policy for his loved ones to bury him.

    Even at the apex of his career he lived in the Richard Allen Projects, a far cry from the deluxe accommodations that his fancy plumage seemed to imply. Then in the same stable with a young Joe Frazier, he had not yet fulfilled his full earning potential in the ring when it was discovered in October 1968 that he was blind in one eye. Stripped by the Pennsylvania Athletic Commission of his license to box, he slid steeply into the realm of alcoholism and drugs - chiefly heroin. He later got jobs that included sweeping the city streets. Never again the same jovial Gypsy once his career ended, he died in March 1990 of a heart attack at the age of 44.

    They passed the hat to bury him. Relatives chipped in enough to buy him a blue suit, an inexpensive coffin and a $105 plot at Merion Memorial Park in Bala Cynwyd, where they lowered Gypsy into a public grave with two other people who also had died that week. The day was gray and very cold, and his younger sister, Arneta Miller, got back in the car at the end of the ceremony thinking: Joe should have had a better funeral. Workers then came to fill in the hole, but there were not enough funds in the hat to afford a headstone at the site. So for 16 years he has remained there, sadly obscure yet not forgotten.

    It was not until John DiSanto began looking for Gypsy Joe that anyone even remembered he did not have a headstone. DiSanto is a boxing fan who runs a Web site honoring the storied history of the sport in Philadelphia, where Gypsy still reigns as a cult figure. DiSanto, 43, never actually had seen Joe in the ring, but became intrigued enough by his sad story that he set out in search of his grave. But that noble quest was not an easy one. Even the staff at the cemetery had trouble locating it initially, and it was not until DiSanto contacted the family itself did they finally find the spot: a piece of barren earth in a sloping corner of the cemetery.

    DiSanto would like to arrange for Gypsy to get a headstone. The Mantua, N.J., native recently did just that for the late junior lightweight Tyrone Everett, whose tragic end occurred in 1977 when his girlfriend shot him during a quarrel in South Philadelphia. When DiSanto discovered Everett did not have a headstone at Eden Cemetery in Collingdale, he took it upon himself to contact the Everett family and offered to pay the $1,500 cost of it himself. In the case of Gypsy Joe, he hopes to generate the funds via donations to the Gravestone Program he has launched on PhillyBoxingHistory.com, his Web site. Help also has come from a beef-and-beer fund-raiser held recently in Camden by the family, which has united behind DiSanto in his effort to honor boxers in the same situation as their departed brother.

    DiSanto stood at the site in a whipping wind last Sunday. "A lot of fighters have a similar story," he said. "They end up with little or no money, and it becomes difficult for the family to even bury them. And some of them opt not to do the gravestone, especially when there are living people who really need the money. "

    Money and Gypsy Joe were only fleeting companions. In the days before the lighter weights commanded high sums, he once said that he never earned more than $12,500 for any bout. Under the stewardship of Yancey Durham, he began his pro career in the fall of 1965 by knocking out Freddie Walker, and 2 years later found himself in Madison Square Garden against welterweight champion Curtis Cokes in a non-title bout. He beat Cokes in a 10-round decision with 500 Philadelphians on hand. The talented Emile Griffith handed him his only defeat in 25 bouts in August 1968. It was during the physical for his bout against Manny Gonzales that October when doctors discovered he was blind in his right eye.

    Gypsy Joe had endured that impairment since his youth, when he stole a trick-or-treat bag from another boy in Camden and was struck by him in the eye with a brick. "There was an urgent boom, boom, boom at the door," remembers Tony Molock, who has written a forthcoming book on his older brother, "Gypsy Joe Harris: Son of Philadelphia. " "And Joe came in holding his eye. " But blindness in that eye did not stop him from entering the ring, nor did it prevent the Pennsylvania Athletic Commission from allowing him to box. While Gypsy later would say he memorized the eye chart, which enabled him to pass the physical the commission required before a bout, he always contended it knew of his affliction and allowed him to box because of his popularity until ring politics forced him out. Whatever the true story, Gypsy failed in his appeal to get his license back.

    Then-commissioner Zack Clayton asked him at his hearing: "How much longer would you fight if you got your license? "

    "Two or 3 years," Gypsy told him.

    "And what would you do then? " Clayton asked.

    "Be rich," Gypsy replied.

    Of the opinion that "we will never know the real answer," DiSanto added: "I find it hard to believe that the people close to him did not know he was blind. But then again, you have to understand that Gypsy was a hustler. So if you were him and had that secret, you had to keep it a secret. " But DiSanto said that while it is understandable that the commission would deny the appeal, he said it was an interesting irony that in an effort to protect Gypsy Joe from being injured in the ring, he was "probably far safer in the ring with one eye than he ever was outside of it. "

    Quite true when you consider what happened in the years that followed. He became depressed and even one day walked up on the Ben Franklin Bridge and looked down into a swirling tide. He later said he came close to jumping, but chose not to because he remembered that he could swim, evidently ignoring the probability that the fall would have done the job. He became hooked on heroin, which left him with tracks up and down an arm and across his back. Arneta remembered that as a young girl she asked Joe what they were and in an act of brotherly concern, he grabbed her by the arm and said: "Never let this happen to you. Never let drugs get into your life. " He also once found his then-teenage sister Renee Fisher passed out on the stoop of their house; someone slipped her drugs in the Wild Irish Rose she had been drinking. Joe carried her on his back to the hospital, where they pumped her stomach. He later told her, "You can not live this way. " Said Renee, "And I never drank again. "

    Gypsy Joe had gone cold turkey by then. Arneta remembered that in the years that followed he was always "kind of sad and kind of depressed," in part because of the way his boxing career had ended and in part because he could not help his five children. People still stopped on the streets in North Philadelphia and said, 'Hey, are you Gypsy Joe? " Hearing that would always boost his spirits, but by then his body had become depleted. Drug abuse had wrecked his heart, perhaps including the use of diuretics to shave pounds off before bouts; Gypsy had never been fond of training. Small social-security checks helped him get by when he was no longer able to work for the city sanitation department. He was waylaid in his early 40s by four heart attacks, the last of which left him in an unconscious state with tubes running in and out of his body.

    By his side were his mother, Helen, and his siblings, who conferred with doctors and decided that Joe would not have wanted to live in that condition. "So we said we would just let nature take its course," said his younger brother, who added that the doctors then removed the breathing tubes and placed him on a morphine drip. Tony remembered that Joe labored to breathe on his own and that he began cheering him on, saying: "Come on. Fight! You are Gypsy Joe! " At one point Joe opened an eye and appeared to look at him. And then he closed it again and died.

    In the searing cold last Sunday at Merion Memorial Park, DiSanto joined Arneta, Renee and sister Daa'iyah Waheed at the place where Gypsy Joe is interred. They were bundled in heavy coats. They remembered having been there 16 years before - yes, this was the place - but were uncertain exactly where the spot was. Someone from the cemetery had told them they would place a temporary marker there, but there was none to be found for Joe, only a few scattered signs for others nearby and, off in the horizon, rows of headstones tilting into the wind.

    DiSanto is unclear at this point what it will cost to come up with a headstone for Gypsy Joe, but guesses it will be somewhere in the vicinity of $2,000. Nor are the sisters certain what they would like it to say, albeit Daa'iyah is leaning toward using the book title: "Gypsy Joe Harris: Son of Philadelphia. " Whatever they come up with, the sisters are delighted that DiSanto contacted them. As the years passed and they had gone on with their lives, the urgency to place a proper marker at the grave waned.

    "This is good of him to do," Arneta said. "And if we can get a fund together, it would be a way to help other boxers in the same situation. "

    Renee stood off to the side and said sadly, "Joe was so young when he died. He should still be with us. " Some paper swirled in the wind as she then added with a smile: "He deserves this."



    Philadelphia Daily News - March 2006
    ________________________________________________

    Mark Kram writes for the Philadelphia Daily News. This article was originally printed in that newspaper in March 2006. This story was awarded first place in the annual Boxing Writers of America writing contest in June 2007.

  8. #128
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    In the Barrio, In La Puente,Ca.
    Posts
    12,026
    vCash
    500

    From The Phillyboxing Site



    TURNER REMAINS UNBEATEN

    On this day in 1951, North Philly's Gil Turner knocked out Rudy Zadell in the 5th round at Toppi Staduim. The win moved Turner to 21-0 (19 KO) but not before Zadell was able to mix things up with the rising Philly star & make it much more of a scrap than expected. The Pittsburgh boxer hurt Gil in the 1st with a hard left look that clearly staggered Turner. Zadell showed his toughness & continued to fight hard until Turner backed Rudy to the ropes with repeated rights and dropped him in round 5. Zadell rose but the bout was stopped.

  9. #129
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    In the Barrio, In La Puente,Ca.
    Posts
    12,026
    vCash
    500

    From The Phillyboxing Site


    HART & TURNER FIGHT JUDGED A DRAW

    On this day in 1958, despite what appeared to be a clear-cut ten round decision win for Garnet "Sugar" Hart in his main event against Gil Turner, was called a draw by the three officials. The crowd of 8,769 at Connie Mack Stadium booed the announcement of the decision heartily. Most unofficial cards favored the 22 year old Hart by a comfortable margin. Turner would fight just three more times. The fight itself turned out to be the last of the big outdoor boxing events in Philadelphia.

  10. #130
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    In the Barrio, In La Puente,Ca.
    Posts
    12,026
    vCash
    500

    From The Phillyboxing Site


    JIMMY TYGH SQUEAKS OUT DECISION OVER RODAK

    On this day in 1940, Nicetown's Jimmy Tygh won an unpopular split decision against Leo Rodak over ten rounds. The fight was a lackluster affair with Rodak a bit too tentative, even though he seemed to be the better fighter. Tygh apparently impressed the officials with his slightly more aggressive approach. The fight, promoted by Phil Glassman, was the evening's semi-windup and played out before 2,600 fans at the Arena. In the main event, Cocoa Kid stopped Johnny Barbara on cuts in the first round of ten.

  11. #131
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    In the Barrio, In La Puente,Ca.
    Posts
    12,026
    vCash
    500

    From The Phillyboxing Site


    FRANK FLETCHER BEATS NORBERTO SABATER

    On this day in 1981, Frank "The Animal" Fletcher pushed his young pro record up to 12-2-1 (9 KO) with a ten-round decision win over Norberto Sabater at the Sand's Hotel & Casino in Atlantic City. The Sand's was a boxing hotbed in the 1980's, and Frank Fletcher was one of its biggest stars. This bout was the first in a string of key starts for Fletcher at the venue that would take him to the brink of a world title shot. In his very next bout he won the USBA middleweight championship against Ernie Singletary.

  12. #132
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    In the Barrio, In La Puente,Ca.
    Posts
    12,026
    vCash
    500

    From The Phillyboxing Site


    LEWIS DECISIONS ETTORE

    On this day in 1937, John Henry Lewis, the light-heavyweight champion, once again rose to the heavyweight division and came to Philadelphia to take on frequent rival Al Ettore. It was their third meeting in six months. The first bout which took place in January '37 was declared a draw. One month later, Lewis took a fifteen round decision over the West Philadelphian. And finally on 6/15, Lewis managed another fifteen round decision over Ettore. This bout took place at Phillies Ball Park before 13,000 fans who saw Lewis win it going away.
    Last edited by kikibalt; 06-14-2007 at 10:42 PM.

  13. #133
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    In the Barrio, In La Puente,Ca.
    Posts
    12,026
    vCash
    500

    From The Phillyboxing Site


    JUNE 16 BIRTHDAYS

    Three big Philly Boxing stars were born on June 16th. First former jr. welter-weight champion Johnny Jadick was born in 1908. He won the title in 1932 by upsetting Tony Canzoneri and went on to post more than 100 wins in his long career. In 1951, Eugene 'Cyclone' Hart was born on 6/16. Hart thrilled fans with his flying fists in the 1970s and ran an impressive 19-bout KO streak to start his career. In 1954, Matthew Saad Mu-hammad was born on June 16. Saad was champ at 175 for 3 years and per-haps Philly's most exciting fighter ever.

  14. #134
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    In the Barrio, In La Puente,Ca.
    Posts
    12,026
    vCash
    500

    From The Phillyboxing Site


    FRAZIER STOPS QUARRY

    On this day in 1974, former heavyweight champ, Joe Frazier, scored a 5th round TKO over Jerry Quarry at Madison Square Garden. The bout was a near repeat of their first fight 5 years prior. Then Frazier was the defending king, rather than a come-backing star, but the ring action was of the same vintage with both tough guys pressing each other hard. Frazier's relentless attack proved to be just too much for Quarry to handle and Joe stopped him two rounds quicker this time. After one more bout, Joe would move on to the Thrilla in Manila.

  15. #135
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    In the Barrio, In La Puente,Ca.
    Posts
    12,026
    vCash
    500

    From The Phillyboxing Site

    PHILLY JACK RELINQUISHES LIGHT HEAVYWEIGHT CROWN

    On June 17, 1912, South Philly's Phila. Jack O'Brien (James Hagen) fought his very last bout (ND 6 Ben Koch) and then retired from the ring, thus relinquishing his light heavyweight title. O'Brien was still considered champion even though he hadn't defended his crown in years, opting instead to campaign mostly in the heavyweight division. Jack won his belt in 1905 with a 13th round TKO of Bob Fitzsimmons and actually never made a title defense, not particularly uncommon in the day.

  16. #136
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    In the Barrio, In La Puente,Ca.
    Posts
    12,026
    vCash
    500

    Re: From The Phillyboxing Site


    JOHNSON STOPS BROTHERS

    On this day in 1951, Manayunk's Harold Johnson sent a message out to all the light-heavyweight and heavyweight contenders with his 10th round TKO of Elkins Brothers. The message was he was ready & willing to take on anyone in either division. Harold dominated the Toppi Stadium bout before 2,676. Brothers was a tough & accomplished foe with the size advantage, but Johnson manhandled him throughout, scoring a knockdown as early as the first round. The beating went on until referee Zack Clayton stepped in during the last round.

  17. #137
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    In the Barrio, In La Puente,Ca.
    Posts
    12,026
    vCash
    500

    From The Phillyboxing Site


    DICK WELSH KOs AL LITTLE
    IN THE THIRD

    On this day in 1930, South Philadelphia bantamweight, Dick Welsh (real name Nick Di Matteo) scored one of only 10 career KOs in a bout at Virginia Beach. His foe was Al Little and the win upped Welsh's young record to 15-6-3 with 2 KOs. Welsh would go on to post an overall record of 62-20-8 (10 KO) in a career that spanned 12 years (note - this record is only a partial listing). He fought and held his own against the likes of Midget Wolgast (four times: 1-2-1), Eddie Cool (W8), & Lou Salica (L6).

  18. #138
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    In the Barrio, In La Puente,Ca.
    Posts
    12,026
    vCash
    500

    From The Phillyboxing Site

    LOUGHRAN COMES OFF THE FLOOR TO BEAT IMPELLITIERE

    On this day in 1935, 7,000 fans watched at Philadelphia Ball Park as Tommy Loughran, the Philly Phantom, fought a near-perfect fight against a lug of a heavyweight from New York, nicknamed "The Imp", Ray Impellitiere. We say near-perfect because Tommy did make one mistake. After cruising through the first three sessions, Loughran got lazy with a lead right hand in round number four, leaving a big fat opening for the hulking New Yorker. And like any New Yorker worth his salt, Impellitiere took advantage of the situation. Coming out of a clinch, Ray blasted Tommy with a counter right that deposited the South Philly slickster on his hands and knees. Along with Loughran, the hometown crowd was shocked. But they cheered their man to his feet and sat back to


    watch the ring general take control of the contest beginning in round five. However, instead of carefully boxing with his six-foot-seven-and-a-half-inch, sixty-six pound heavier opponent, Tommy took the fight right to him, backing the giant down with hard body work and slashing left hands to the mug. Of course Tommy mixed in a good dose of his renowned footwork and defensive movements to ensure that the Imp never got another chance at Loughran's freckled chin. But it was Tommy's aggressiveness that made Impellitiere timid and apprehensive to throw more jack-hammer rights. When the smoke cleared after ten full rounds, Loughran was the winner by unanimous decision. This bout was the second of three meetings between the two. Tommy took all three contests by ten round decision.


    FIGHT RESULTS ON THIS DATE:
    1935 - Leroy Haynes W10 Ed "Unknown" Winston at Philadelphia Ball Park

    1955 - Gene Fullmer W10 Gil Turner at Salt Lake City, UT
    1982 - Frank Fletcher W12 Clint Jackson at the Sands Hotel Casino in Atlantic City (USBA Title)

  19. #139
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    In the Barrio, In La Puente,Ca.
    Posts
    12,026
    vCash
    500

    From The Phillyboxing Site



    LOUGHRAN COMES OFF THE FLOOR TO BEAT IMPELLITIERE

    On this day in 1935, 7,000 fans watched at Philadelphia Ball Park as Tommy Loughran, the Philly Phantom, fought a near-perfect fight against a lug of a heavyweight from New York, nicknamed "The Imp", Ray Impellitiere. We say near-perfect because Tommy did make one mistake. After cruising through the first three sessions, Loughran got lazy with a lead right hand in round number four, leaving a big fat opening for the hulking New Yorker. And like any New Yorker worth his salt, Impellitiere took advantage of the situation. Coming out of a clinch, Ray blasted Tommy with a counter right that deposited the South Philly slickster on his hands and knees. Along with Loughran, the hometown crowd was shocked. But they cheered their man to his feet and sat back to


    watch the ring general take control of the contest beginning in round five. However, instead of carefully boxing with his six-foot-seven-and-a-half-inch, sixty-six pound heavier opponent, Tommy took the fight right to him, backing the giant down with hard body work and slashing left hands to the mug. Of course Tommy mixed in a good dose of his renowned footwork and defensive movements to ensure that the Imp never got another chance at Loughran's freckled chin. But it was Tommy's aggressiveness that made Impellitiere timid and apprehensive to throw more jack-hammer rights. When the smoke cleared after ten full rounds, Loughran was the winner by unanimous decision. This bout was the second of three meetings between the two. Tommy took all three contests by ten round decision.


    FIGHT RESULTS ON THIS DATE:
    1935 - Leroy Haynes W10 Ed "Unknown" Winston at Philadelphia Ball Park

    1955 - Gene Fullmer W10 Gil Turner at Salt Lake City, UT
    1982 - Frank Fletcher W12 Clint Jackson at the Sands Hotel Casino in Atlantic City (USBA Title)
    Last edited by kikibalt; 06-20-2007 at 02:37 PM.

  20. #140
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    In the Barrio, In La Puente,Ca.
    Posts
    12,026
    vCash
    500

    Re: From The Phillyboxing Site


    TOPPI STADIUM

    Today's featured fight - Charley Spicer vs. Herman McCray - took place at one of Philly Boxing History's all-time great venues. The site was Toppi Stadium, a seasonal outdoor arena located at Broad and Packer Streets in South Phila-delphia. Promoter Jimmy Toppi built the stadium to seat 5,000 fans and ran summertime shows between 1948 and 1954. The inaugural main event, staged on 7/15/48, saw Eddie Giosa win a ten-round decision over Johnny Forte. Today, Toppi Stadium is gone and in its place now stands a "Chickie & Pete's

  21. #141
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    In the Barrio, In La Puente,Ca.
    Posts
    12,026
    vCash
    500

    Re: From The Phillyboxing Site

    BORN TODAY:
    JOE BORRELL

    On this day in 1892, middleweight Joe Borrell was born. His real name was Joseph Borrelli and he was one of Philadelphia's toughest all-time fighters. In 1913, Borrell threw out a challenge to all the other 160-pounders of his day. Tired of being avoided, the Kensington tough guy, who was managed by the legendary Johnny Burns, laid out a $500 bounty for any other middleweight aiming for a national spotlight who was willing to fight him. However, the stunt produced no takers. Joe fought on for 14 years.

  22. #142
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    In the Barrio, In La Puente,Ca.
    Posts
    12,026
    vCash
    500

    From The Phillyboxing Site


    ETTORE VS HAYNES III

    On this day in 1936, Al Ettore & Leroy Haynes brought unbeaten streaks into the ring with them for their outdoor, 15-rounder. The pair had fought twice before the prior summer with Ettore winning both (W10, W12). But Haynes was riding a 7-bout KO streak which included a KO of Willie Reddish and 2 over Primo Carnera. This time out, Ettore pressed the action from the start & banked round after round. After 15, he took the decision, probably winning 11 rounds. Former champ James Brad-dock was the referee. 15,000 attended.

  23. #143
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    In the Barrio, In La Puente,Ca.
    Posts
    12,026
    vCash
    500

    From The Phillyboxing Site

    ON THE UNDERCARD: WALCOTT DEFEATS THE OTHER JOHNSON

    On the undercard of Ettore-Haynes III, Jersey Joe Walcott, Merchantville, NJ, scored a second round TKO victory when he broke his opponent's nose with a ram-rod right hand. His opponent was a tall heavyweight from NJ named Phil Johnson. Phil had a so-so boxing career but still contributed much to the history of the sport, as he is the father of the great Harold Johnson, light-heavyweight champ. Walcott, the Johnson-family spoiler, also KO'd Harold in 1950.

  24. #144
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    In the Barrio, In La Puente,Ca.
    Posts
    12,026
    vCash
    500

    Re: From The Phillyboxing Site

    Philly Boxing History

    JUNE 23, 1930

    GODFREY DQ'd VS. CARNERA

    George Godfrey and future heavyweight champion Primo Carnera faced off before almost 30,000 fans outdoors at the Phillies Ballpark, on this day in 1930. The hot ticket pitted the old pro Godfrey, desperate for a chance at the world title, against the Italian import who after about two years in the ring, was attracting much attention. However, as rumors of the possible fixes & set-ups that allegedly filled Carnera's record circulated, much of the attention paid to him was a debate on his validity as a real prospect. Godfrey on the other hand, was a proven commodity who had to settle for lesser opportunities because he was black and because he was dangerous.

    The bout began with a fast start by Godfrey, who nailed Carnera with big shots that staggered the giant. Primo weathered the storm, showing a lot of grit if not an abundance of talent. But after two or three rounds, Godfrey started showing signs of fatigue, giving Carnera a chance to surge. Primo did start to land, and actually began to take over the fight. Later in the third, Godfrey was warned for hitting low. Carnera continued his attack for a couple of rounds. In round five, Godfrey was warned for hitting low again. Immediately after this second warning, big George clocked Carnera with a thunderous low blow, and the Italian crashed to the canvas. Primo writhed in pain for several minutes while Godfrey stewed in the neutral corner. After a bit, it was deemed that Godfrey's low blows were intentional fouls and Carnera was declared the winner of the bout by disqualification.

    Much speculation has surrounded this event in the years since. Some say the deck was stacked against Godfrey and that he would have "lost" the fight no matter what happened - like of many of Primo's opponents. Other stories claim that George was in on the fix and followed orders to foul out. Less scandalous tales blame the ref for calling the blows intentional and some even say that the tiring Godfrey found a way out of the fight without falling to the young stud. In any case, this legendary Philly fight marked an important milestone on the future champion's record and yet another frustration on Godfrey's.


    1962:
    JOHNSON DEFENDS IN BERLIN

    World light-heavyweight champion, Harold Johnson traveled all the way to Berlin, West Germany to defend his 175 pound crown against hometown southpaw Gustav "Bubi" Scholz. The fifteen round fight was staged at Berlin's Olympia Stadium, the same venue that hosted the 1936 Olympic Games where Jesse Owens won four gold medals, twenty-six years before.

    Manayunk's Harold Johnson defended his world title belt by unanimous decision. He staggered Bubi in round six, but Scholz survived and made a real fight of it, pressing and working the entire fight. He even buckled Harold's knees with a hard combination in the tenth. Bubi's home crowd of 35,000 cheered wildly for their man, but Johnson was the better fighter and took his belt back home with him.


    OTHER FIGHT RESULTS ON THIS DATE:
    1924 - George Godfrey TKO3 Jack Thompson at Philadelphia, PA

    1937 - Dick Welsh W10 Gene Gollotto at Philadelphia, PA
    Last edited by kikibalt; 06-23-2007 at 03:31 PM.

  25. #145
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    In the Barrio, In La Puente,Ca.
    Posts
    12,026
    vCash
    500

    Re: From The Phillyboxing Site


    By Chuck Hasson

    In the long and storied career of Sugar Ray Robinson there is rarely any mention made about the significant contribution the city of Philadelphia made in the molding of this great legend.

    When Robinson turned pro in 1940 after a spectacular amateur career, he was obviously highly sought after by the boxing "fraternity." Mike Jacobs, the most powerful man in the sport at the time, wanted Ray to sign an exclusive promotional contract with his New York-based Twentieth Century Sporting Club. But Robinson, wanting to maintain his independence in negotiating with the highest bidder, shocked Jacobs by signing an "exclusive contract" with Philadelphia promoter Herman Taylor to promote matches for him in the Quaker City. This gave Robinson a trump card in all future dealings with Jacobs for lucrative matches.

    Taylor knew right away Robinson was a great fighter and gave him co-billing with Gus Dorazio in only Ray's fifth pro start against 150 bout veteran Norment Quarles, who had met 10 world champions and only a month previously had held our own Bob Montgomery to a draw. Robinson flattened Quarles in thrilling fashion in 4 rounds.

    In 1941 Taylor put Robinson in his first main-events at the Arena against contenders Jimmy Tygh, Nick Castiglione and Mike Evans, all of whom he flattened in short order.

    That summer Taylor gave Ray his first "world class" attention when he matched him with lightweight champion Sammy Angott in a non-title (overweight) affair at Shibe Park before 15,000 fight fans. Robinson electrified the crowd by dropping the rugged champ on his face in round two and winning a convincing decision after 10 hard fought rounds. Now thanks to Herman Taylor and Philadelphia, Sugar Ray was already being tabbed by many as the best fighter in the world.

    Robinson returned to Philadelphia Convention Hall in September for a highly anticipated battle of undefeated contenders against the future welterweight champ Marty Servo with 11,000 on hand. Ray won a tough but convincing nod over his aggressive rival with pin point punching.

    By now Sugar Ray's services were in demand throughout the country but he always returned to Philly to battle for Taylor against anyone brave enough to take him on. In '42 he beat Izzy Jannazzo at the Arena (9,917 paid) and KO'd Al Nettlow at Convention Hall (7,868 paid).

    During the war, Robinson served a stint in the Army, but he was acclaimed as the "uncrowned" welterweight champion, and his next Philadelphia appearance was momentous. In May 1945, top rated middleweight Jose Basora held Ray to a draw before 14,653 fans squeezed into Convention Hall. Only a last round rally by the Sugar Man salvaged the "tie" in the eyes of the officials and some of the crowd.

    By 1948 Robinson had become welterweight champ and returned here for a 10 round tune-up win over Bobby Lee at the Arena, and in '49 against the sensational Cuban Kid Gavilan at Municipal Stadium with 27,805 watching him retain his crown in a breathtaking victory and earning the largest purse of his career (up to that time).

    In 1950, Camden based George "Sugar Costner, rated the no. 1 contender, claimed he would prove he was "the Real Sugar". In front of 11,747 Convention Hall clients, Sugar Ray Robinson crushed Costner in 2:49 of the first round. Some old-time Philly fistic followers insisted this was Ray's greatest fight.

    By June, 1950, State Athletic Commissioner "Ox" DeGrosa vacated Jake LaMotta's middleweight title for various reasons and matched Robinson against tough French challenger Robert Villemain for the Pennsylvania version of the "world middleweight championship" at Municipal Stadium. He won easily before 22,004 witnesses. Returning to Convention Hall in October he defended his state "world title" against a then little known Hawaiian, Bobo Olson, finishing him in the 12th round.

    Sugar Ray won the undisputed world middleweight title in '51, retired in '52, came back in 1955 to re-gain the crown and didn't box again in Philadelphia (except for one exhibition) until as former champ, he met Joey Giardello at Convention Hall in June 1963. It was like old times with Her-man Taylor promoting the bout as he had

    Robinson vs. Nettlow

    Robinson vs. Angott

    Robinson & Gavilan

    Robinson vs. Gavilan

    Robinson vs. Costner

    Robinson vs. Villemain

    Robinson vs. Giardello

    done 23 years before when he first showcased Ray in Philly, and promising the winner a shot at the title. Unfortunately for Ray, Joey won the match and took the title from Dick Tiger.

    Sugar Ray Robinson's last fight in Philadelphia was in 1965 against Young Joe Walcott (Harvey McCulluogh), a winning effort that pushed Ray's Philly win-lost log to 18-1-1, with 11 KO's.

    As we can see, the City of Philadelphia played an important role in developing the Sugar Ray Robinson legend.



    Chuck Hasson is a boxing historian and the Assistant Editor of this web site.
    Last edited by kikibalt; 06-23-2007 at 03:52 PM.

  26. #146
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    In the Barrio, In La Puente,Ca.
    Posts
    12,026
    vCash
    500

    From The Phillyboxing Site


    GIARDELLO EARNS TITLE SHOT WITH SUGAR RAY WIN

    On this day in 1963, Joey Giardello cleared the last of many hurdles needed to finally earn another crack at the 160 pound title. This test was against former multi-champ, Sugar Ray Robinson. Al-though he was near the end of his career, Ray was still a skilled foe & one that the powers that be wanted to see back in a championship ring. Joey, no fresh-faced kid at this point, knew he HAD to win this one or else his chance would never come. Joey got the 10-round nod & won the championship in his next bout.

  27. #147
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    In the Barrio, In La Puente,Ca.
    Posts
    12,026
    vCash
    500

    Re: From The Phillyboxing Site


    1973: BRISCOE VS DOUGLAS

    On this day in 1973, Bennie Briscoe TKO'd Billy Douglas at 2:42 of round 8. Briscoe stunned Douglas in round 1, dropped him in round 2, cut him in the 4th & brutalized him until ref Pete Tom-asco stepped in. It was an impressive win but Bennie's head-hunting frustrated his trainer Quenzell McCall, whose fight-plan called for Briscoe's trademark body attack. "Bennie was horrible", McCall said. But Briscoe couldn't resist the easy target of Douglas' chin. "Why should I go to the body when I'm knocking the guy off balance with the jab."

  28. #148
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    In the Barrio, In La Puente,Ca.
    Posts
    12,026
    vCash
    500

    From The Phillyboxing Site


    BATTLING LEVINSKY
    IN ACTION

    On this day in 1920, light-heavy champ Battling Levinsky (Barney Lebrowitz) won a 10-round decision over Ray Smith at Cleveland, in a non-title bout. Smith was a fighter from Camden, NJ who would go on to face Gene Tunney, Tommy Gibbons, & Leo Houck later in his career. Levinsky had won the title four years prior, but had yet to defend it - a surefire strategy for a long run at the top. Battling finally defended his crown in his next bout (10/12/20) against Georges Carpentier, and lost it by KO in 4 rds.

  29. #149
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    In the Barrio, In La Puente,Ca.
    Posts
    12,026
    vCash
    500

    Re: From The Phillyboxing Site


    DIED ON THIS DAY:
    PROMOTER HERMAN TAYLOR

    On this day in 1980, Herman Taylor, the greatest boxing promoter in history, died at the ripe old age of 93. Taylor began in the biz when he was just a kid & before long began to stretch his legs as a big-time promoter. Almost 70 years later, he was still planning matches at the time of his death. Originally he staged shows with his partner, Bobby Gunnis, who died in 1936. Taylor continued on solo for decades more, promoting just about every big Philly show through 1975 before passing the torch to Russell Peltz.

  30. #150
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    In the Barrio, In La Puente,Ca.
    Posts
    12,026
    vCash
    500

    Re: From The Phillyboxing Site


    TOMMY LOUGHRAN WINS GARDEN BOUT

    On this day in 1928, light heavyweight champion, Tommy Loughran took a non-title fight between a pair of defenses against Pete Latzo. His opponent on this day was Armand Emanuel. Loughran won a ten round decision at Madison Square Garden. Loughran would hold his title for another fifteen months before relinquishing the crown in 1929 to chase his dream to be heavyweight champ. Tommy was one of Philly's greatest stars. He compiled a pro record of 109-30-11 with 17 KOs & 25 No Decisions.

+ Reply to Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
News Current Champs WAIL! Encyclopedia Links Home