Home News Current Champs WAIL! Encyclopedia
The Cyber Boxing Zone Message Board
+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 31 to 37 of 37

Thread: Cotto-Quintana, Margarito-Clottey Pre-fight Press & Predictions

  1. #31
    MANAGING EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    In an undisclosed bunker deep in the weird, wild, woods of the Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    11,450
    vCash
    500

    Re: Cotto-Quintana, Margarito-Clottey Pre-fight Press & Predictions

    Frozen (Out) Margarito
    By Bernard Fernandez from Max Boxing

    Antonio Margarito is 5’11”, tall for a welterweight but hardly Shaq-sized. In terms of physical stature alone, the WBO champion from Tijuana, Mexico, hardly resembles the scary behemoth that Godzilla, King Kong, the Terminator and Frankenstein’s monster all would cross the street to avoid.

    To hear some people tell it – many of whom draw their paychecks from Margarito’s promotional company, Top Rank – Margarito is ducked more than a low overhang and sidestepped more than clumsy linebackers attempting to tackle Barry Sanders in the open field. He induces such trepidation in would-be opponents, you’d think they might prefer being strapped down in the chair of the tooth-drilling, anesthesia-withholding sadist of a dentist portrayed by Laurence Olivier in Marathon Man.

    As he approaches his Showtime-televised Dec. 2 title defense against Ghana-born, Bronx-based challenger Joshua Clottey (30-1, 20 KOs) in Atlantic City’s Boardwalk Hall, Margarito (33-4, 24 KOs) addressed his burgeoning reputation as a major bad-ass unable to lure fearful guys with bigger names (think Floyd Mayweather Jr.) into the ring with him.

    “Floyd’s seen enough of me to know how good I am,” Margarito said. “He doesn’t want to fight me. I’m through asking him. I’m done with that. I’m moving forward. If he ever decides to fight me, fine. If he doesn’t, that’s fine, too. I’m still proving to everyone who the best guy is.

    “Throughout my championship reign, I have always expected to fight the best fighters out there. I’m always hoping to make big, entertaining fights with other champions. No one ever accepted my challenge. It’s not a question of them ducking me, but they don’t seem to want to fight me. What am I supposed to make of that?”

    Top Rank founder Bob Arum, as usual, is right there with the explanation.

    “Nobody wants to fight (Margarito) because he’s just too good, too dangerous,” Arum said. “I don’t think it’s going overboard (to say that). It takes someone with guts, like Joshua Clottey, to step into the ring with Antonio. I think Antonio poses problems for any welterweight in the world.”

    And it’s not only Mayweather who is steering clear of Margarito, Arum noted.

    “Let me give you an example,” he continued. “Shane Mosley got hold of somebody who called me. Shane said, through this third party, that he wanted to fight Miguel Cotto, (contingent upon) Cotto beating Carlos Quintana (for the vacant WBA welterweight title). I told this person that Cotto, if he wins, has an obligation to fight (Oktay) Urkal. So why not have Shane fight Margarito, if he beats Clottey? The money would be the same.

    “But the word came back to me that Shane doesn’t want to fight Margarito. So there’s got to make something there. We’re not making this s**t up.

    “Let’s put all the baloney aside. Mayweather was offered $8 million to fight Antonio. He turned it down. When he fought (Carlos) Baldomir, he didn’t make anything like $8 million. I don’t care what they’re saying, nobody guaranteed him anything close to that.

    “Mayweather chose not to fight Margarito because he was looking down the line to fight (Oscar) De La Hoya and Margarito was too dangerous. That’s the point. Nobody is saying Mayweather is physically afraid of any fighter. But he didn’t want to fight Margarito because Margarito was too risky. Period. The end. Don’t insult anybody’s intelligence trying to hypothesize anything else.”

    Whether Margarito is or is not the best welterweight in the world – it says here that he isn’t, not so long as Mayweather, now in possession of Baldomir’s WBC belt by virtue of his Nov. 4 unanimous decision over the Argentine, can make 147 pounds – or poses too much of a threat to the superstars for them to sign on the dotted line – that very well may be – is not the issue. What really was evident earlier this week, during three teleconferences to hype competing fight cards on Showtime and HBO, is the fast and loose manner in which fact and fiction are juxtaposed for the purpose of attracting viewers and ratings.

    It is by now a given that Arum’s most enduring utterance – “Yesterday I was lying, today I’m telling the truth” – will follow him to the grave, as did W.C. Fields’ legendary observance of his anticipated final resting place. “All things considered, I’d rather be in Philadelphia,” Fields cracked, the inference being that it is better, if only barely, than to be alive and breathing on the streets of Philly than six feet beneath the dirt anywhere else.

    Arum, as is the case with every successful promoter, is a bit like the demon in The Exorcist, in that he mixes lies – well, let’s be nice and call them factual distortions – with the truth, the better to confuse the public and thus maximize profits.

    In a very real sense, Arum is depicting Margarito in such a manner that the Mexican knockout artist not only must oppose and defeat Clottey, but the specter of Mayweather and Mosley as well as a competing event on HBO in which middleweights Winky Wright (50-3-1, 25 KOs) and Ike Quartey (37-3-1, 31 KOs) will duke it out in Tampa, Fla.

    The gist of Wright’s message, conveyed in association with Golden Boy CEO Richard Schaefer, is that Wright is the ultimate craftsman, a gloved artist whose exquisite performances are not to be missed by discerning fans.

    Earlier that same day, Cotto (27-0, 22 KOs) and Quintana (23-0, 18 KOs), with Arum riding shotgun, promised a demonstration of blunt-force trauma, of the sort that made Arturo Gatti a Boardwalk Hall institution. The tune remained more or less the same the following day, with possibly an even greater emphasis on the crushing power presumably possessed by Margarito.

    It is a circle dance boxing writers engage in regularly, in which promoters, fighters and pay-cable operators do more spin-doctoring than a room full of spiders with medical degrees. Tales are told and, to be accepted at face value or maybe not, and variations of those tales are passed along by us to readers who hold the economic key to every event. Decide that which is true and what is false at your own risk.

    I have sat in on enough of these sessions to have, I believe, a better understanding than most on what can and should be believed. Those with a vested interest in a particular outcome speak in a sort of self-serving code, sometimes presented with passion, sometimes under the guise of cool detachment.

    True: Some fighters are loath to risk a blemish on their record, lest it do damage to their image and earning power. Mayweather, to be sure, seems almost paranoid about preserving his undefeated status. Before his June 25, 2005, matchup with Gatti, for instance, “Pretty Boy Floyd” derided the fact that Gatti had lost six bouts. “In 33 fights, I’ve never shown a weakness,” Mayweather said. “I will never show a weakness. He’s shown his weakness. He’s lost six times, so there are at least six ways to beat him. I’m going to show you the seventh way.”

    False: A defeat in any bout, if it is entertaining enough, does not diminish a fighter; it can only enhance his popularity. Was Thomas Hearns devalued by losing that toe-to-toe war with Marvelous Marvin Hagler? Would Muhammad Ali have been better off saying, “Oh, I don’t need to fight Joe Frazier. I think I’ll take a rematch with Jean-Pierre Coopman”?

    True: Promoters adhere to the Stephen Stills song lyrics that if you can’t be with the one you love, love the one you’re with. A little more than a year ago, Arum, who was then Mayweather’s promoter and hoped to remain in that capacity, assured anyone who would listen that PBF was the greatest fighter (ital) of all time.(end ital) Now Arum would have us believe that Mayweather is almost a gutless wonder, hiding in the shadows rather than to find himself in the cross-hairs of Margarito’s fists. And we won’t even try to get into the 180-degree reversal of Arum’s almost paternal devotion to De La Hoya into something akin to unvarnished hatred.

    False: Grudges last forever only if you’re a Hatfield or a McCoy. This summer, longtime archrivals Arum and Don King, who once described Arum as a “master of trickeration,” stood side by side, smiling, and saying in stereo that they were convinced a Mayweather-Zab Judah fight would do bigger business than De La Hoya-Felix Trinidad. Now, that’s two masters of trickeration.

    True: Antonio Margarito is an exciting fighter, one of the best on the planet, a wrecking ball who might be best known for his four-knockdown stoppage of the previously undefeated Kermit Cintron. It’s not unreasonable to assume that some of the welterweight division’s elite would choose to stay away from him.

    False: He has firmly assumed his place on boxing’s center stage and won’t be nudged off any time soon. Hey, Margarito-Clottey is not even the main event; Cotto-Quintana, which pits two Puerto Ricans with sizable East Coast followings, is.

    In the end, what is said and what is believed beforehand really doesn’t matter much. In the ring, where posturing means little, all is eventually revealed.

    At which time the postfight analyses begin, which is just an adjusted version of the prefight speculation.

  2. #32
    MANAGING EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    In an undisclosed bunker deep in the weird, wild, woods of the Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    11,450
    vCash
    500

    Re: Cotto-Quintana, Margarito-Clottey Pre-fight Press & Predictions

    Margarito and Cotto Gamble to Meet in the Near Future
    By David A. Avila

    WBO welterweight titleholder Antonio Margarito and welterweight contender Miguel Cotto appear on separate boxing bouts on Saturday for the final buildup in Atlantic City, a town renown for gambling.

    Margarito (33-4, 24 KOs) has been on every welterweight's do-not-fight list while Cotto has been on everyone's hit list, and now the two showcase their fistic talent at the Boardwalk Hall on Saturday Dec. 2 to set the stage for their own collision next year. The duo's contests will be televised by Showtime.


    Like a plague, Margarito has slowly emerged to the top of the heap in the 147-pound welterweight division and has scared off almost everyone.

    But two weeks ago the Tijuana-based fighter, while sparring in a South El Monte gym, sprained his ankle and collapsed with a scream of pain. Now he faces a rugged and hungry opponent in Joshua Clottey whose biggest opportunity lies in front of him like a dangling piece of steak.

    "I respect Margarito a lot. I love the way he fights. It is the way I fight," Clottey (29-1, 18 KOs) said by telephone. "We all know that only the strong survive."

    Amid the roulette wheels, crap tables and poker players in the East Coast gambling city, Margarito is gambling that his right ankle will hold up in a 12-round world title fight.

    "At the time that it happened I was really afraid I was not going to be able to fight," said Margarito about his sparring injury to his right ankle. "But everything worked out nicely. I will be 100% on Dec. 2."

    Cotto (27-0, 22 KOs) has his own gamble going. The Puerto Rican standout has evacuated from the comfortable confines of the 140-pound junior welterweight limit to move into the heavier division where the likes of not only Margarito roam, but blockbusting fighters such as Kermit Cintron, Paul Williams, Floyd Mayweather and even Shane Mosley inhabit.

    But first Cotto faces fellow Puerto Rican Carlos Quintana (23-0, 18 KOs) for the vacant WBA welterweight title.

    Top Rank, which promotes both Margarito and Cotto, hopes that the Mexican and Puerto Rican Cotto are victorious and can then fight each other perhaps in June on Puerto Rican day in New York.

    "That's our intention," said Bob Arum, president of Top Rank.

    Like Margarito, Cotto faces an enormous gamble that those punches that shook him in the lighter junior welterweight division will bounce off him like Teflon in the welterweight level. It's a big risk.

    "I think it will be much better at this weight," Cotto said during a telephone press conference call. "I think you're going to see the difference in the fight."

    Facing him is fellow "Boricua" Quintana, a left-hander with slick moves and sneaky power that has enabled him to stop 18 of 23 opponents. The Puerto Rican from Moca has been one of those prizefighters that fly below the radar of the elite but not because of a lack of skill. His victory over the favored Joel Julio in Las Vegas last June shocked many with his convincing victory. Now he faces the favored Cotto.

    "When I beat him (Cotto) it will be probably because of my quality as a boxer. Not because he is moving up to welterweight," said Quintana with a quiet confidence. "Hopefully I'll get the same exposure as he has been getting after I win."

    Quintana uses his left jab and moves in and out like a human mongoose. When he fights Cotto it will be mongoose versus the cobra.

    "That is why I have been training and sparring a lot of rounds against left-handers," Cotto says. "You just prepare yourself for them so there will be no difficulties."

    Against DeMarcus Corley almost two years ago, a junior welterweight southpaw, Cotto was nearly knocked out with a left hand. It was the first time anyone had seen Cotto hurt or dazed.

    Lefties have that X-factor whenever they fight.

    Both Cotto and Margarito are basically at the roulette wheel hoping the little marble hits black. It's 50-50 for both.

    "We have confidence in both of them," Arum said.


    Winky Wright

    Speaking of lefties, several hundred miles south in Florida, Winky Wright engages Ghana's Ike Quartey in a 12-round non-title middleweight bout. The contest will be televised on HBO.

    Wright, who is considered by many as the best fighter pound-for-pound in the world, has campaigned like a Presidential candidate for years of his ability. Until he beat Mosley twice, few took him seriously.

    "Thanks to Shane people know who I am," said Wright while training in Las Vegas. "He gave me my opportunity or people would still not know who I am."

    After Mosley came the dreaded Felix Trinidad. Wright embarrassed him over 12 rounds in front of a worldwide audience. Trinidad retired.

    "I told everybody that I could beat him," Wright explained. "He's a good fighter but I can box and I can fight."

    Last June against middleweight world champion Jermain Taylor the world got a glimpse of Wright's talent. For 12 rounds they fought on even terms. It ended in a draw that saw both sides claiming victory.

    "Every time I hit him I moved him. He didn't move me," Wright said. "Jermain is good but he don't want to fight me again."

    Now Wright faces a Quartey fighter who fights in a similar jab and block style.

    "I'm much stronger than he is," Wright says.

    Dan Birmingham, who trains Wright, said Quartey is no pushover.

    "He's got a lot left," Birmingham said of Quartey.

    Another fighter who has a lot left is Jeff Lacy who is also trained by Birmingham. Lacy faces Vitaly Tsypko again. Their fight in 2004 ended in a no-contest because of a cut suffered by the Ukrainian during an accidental clash of heads.

    The heavy-handed Lacy returns to the ring since losing to Joe Calzaghe last March in Great Britain.

    "We've been working on a lot of things," Birmingham said. "Jeff is ready."


    Fights on television

    Fri. Telefutura, 8 p.m., Ricardo Castillo (27-2) vs. Takalani Ndlovu (26-3).

    Fri. Showtime, 11 p.m., Timothy Bradley (16-0) vs. Jaime Rangel (30-9-1).

    Sat. HBO, 6:45 p.m., Winky Wright (50-3-1) vs. Ike Quartey (37-3-1).

    Sat. Showtime, 9 p.m., Antonio Margarito (33-4) vs. Joshua Clottey (29-1).

  3. #33
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    180
    vCash
    500

    Re: Cotto-Quintana, Margarito-Clottey Pre-fight Press & Predictions

    Cotto - Quintana will be a good fight. Quintana has good stamina and his southpaw style will be a problem.

  4. #34
    MANAGING EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    In an undisclosed bunker deep in the weird, wild, woods of the Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    11,450
    vCash
    500

    Re: Cotto-Quintana, Margarito-Clottey Pre-fight Press & Predictions

    Cotto-Quintana/Margarito-Clottey Fight Predictions from Sweet Science

    Live Saturday night from Boardwalk Hall in Atlantic City, Showtime brings us a championship welterweight doubleheader featuring undefeated Puerto Rican sensation Miguel Cotto going up against his fellow undefeated homie Carlos Quintana for the WBA welterweight title vacated by Ricky Hatton. Quintana's got the confidence, size, reach, thirst, and southpaw stance, but Cotto's got the pedigree. It could be anyone's fight. On the co-main we've got Antonio Margarito, the man no one wants to fight, getting it on and getting down and dirty with the hungry Ghanaian slugger Joshua Clottey. There's a lot on the line for all four fighters in both bouts and there'll be a lot of punches thrown and lot of punches eaten. Expect the unexpected Saturday night. This is how The Sweet Science writers see Cotto/Quintana and Margarito/Clottey.


    Never been a big fan of Miguel Cotto. He stands in front of you and seems so easy to hit. Over time, though, he's earned my respect for his sheer toughness and ability to break an opponent down. The way he methodically beat up Paulie Malignaggi was almost disturbing to watch. That being said, and having seen Quintana only once, I like Quintana to upset Cotto. I think he possesses the toughness and boxing skills to frustrate Cotto, and I see him winning a very close decision. I think Margarito may have too much firepower for Clottey in a fun-to-watch fight that will end in the ninth round with Margarito winning by TKO.
    Mitch Abramson

    Cotto has been flirting with disaster for a couple years now, and that may or may not be because he has been struggling to make 140 pounds. But, in Quintana, he's fighting a full-fledged welterweight with above-average boxing skills and a sturdy chin. Cotto has had his fair share of troubles with boxers (DeMarcus Corley, Paul Malignaggi), and Quintana is bigger and better than both. Cotto's punch won't bail him out this time. Upset! Quintana by split decision.
    Matthew Aguilar

    The House of Gatti is a fitting venue for this Saturday's slugfests. In the opener, my heart will be with fellow Bronxite Joshua Clottey, but my money is on Antonio Margarito. Margarito has not lost at welterweight in more than a decade, and has never been stopped. Both champion and challenger share the aggressive style and toughness to make their match a thriller, but Margarito's experience at the championship level will spell the difference. Margarito retains his WBO title with a hard-fought decision. The all-Puerto Rican battle for the vacant WBA welterweight title should be equally exciting. Miguel Cotto will carry his power with him as he moves up to welterweight, but he will also bring his suspect chin. Cotto was down and almost out against Ricardo Torres last time he fought at Boardwalk Hall, and was badly hurt by DeMarcus Corley, who is not known for his punching power. Cotto showed tremendous heart in coming back each time to knock out his opponent, but against a 147-pounder, his big heart may not be enough to compensate for his susceptible chin. Undefeated southpaw Carlos Quintana, though relatively unknown, has faced credible opposition, and significantly, has made his career at 147 pounds. Look for Quintana, 23-0 with 18 knockouts, to test Cotto's chin and then finish the job. Quintana beats Cotto by knockout.
    David Berlin

    Cotto appears to have the better form, having mixed it a better class of fighters but is moving up a weight. Quintana's record, in contrast, doesn't have the same ripeness of competition. Cotto by decision or late stoppage.
    Peter M. Carvill

    I'm taking Margarito to win this fight by late TKO. Clottey is extremely tough but takes a lot of shots. Margarito will be too strong for Clottey ... Cotto vs. Quintana is a tough fight to pick. I want to immediately pick Cotto but Quintana's win over Joel Julio was such a masterpiece that I wouldn't be surprised if he spoiled the evening for Cotto fans. My official pick is Cotto by a close decision. The only sure bet is that Saturday will be a pretty good night of boxing.
    Ralph Gonzalez

    How about a parlay of the underdogs? If the fight were at 140 we'd like Cotto, but it's not. In viewing the two of them side by side earlier this week it was apparent that Quintana is the larger of the two unbeaten fighters, and hence more likely to be comfortable at the weight. In a big fight you usually want your guy to use his head, but in Clottey's case that would be a mistake. The only two blemishes on the Ghanaian's record -- a DQ loss and a technical draw -- were the result of head-butts, initiated by him. If he can keep the referee off his back he has a chance against Margarito, who still seems to be thinking more about Mayweather and De La Hoya and even Cotto than about Clottey, a dangerous sign.
    George Kimball

    Cotto has shown himself to be vulnerable at the lighter weight, so he is taking a big chance against Quintana who is a natural welterweight. But I believe the extra weight will make Cotto stronger and he should win a close, hard-fought decision against the always dangerous Quintana ... Because of all the hoopla regarding his failed attempts to get Floyd Mayweather in the ring with him, Margarito wants to prove to the world that he would be a formidable foe for the reluctant warrior (Mayweather). Although Clottey is a rough customer, Margarito will be on a mission and will stop him around the eighth round.
    Robert Mladinich

    Miguel Cotto needs to win big and set in motion the dynamics of a career that has the look of something interesting in the short term future and to do that he needs Saturday night to be one of those big nights when he makes a statement. How about a left hook all the way from Caguas, Puerto Rico, airmail, special delivery? I am picking Cotto to beat Quintana, but can he grab our attention again? Margarito will do what Margarito does, ply his trade and punish. He's looking more and more like the Mike McCallum of his generation. Right now he's got Clottey to dismantle with his signature stylings and I expect him to stay focused and do it. What we all want from Margarito is a post-fight short list of who he feels is AWOH Absent With Out Honor in the championship ranks.
    Patrick Kehoe

    Joshua Clottey's flashy -- every eye's on him in the gym. Can't-miss written all over him: blazing hand speed, power from both sides, an arsenal deeper than Santa's toy bag, and reflexes so quick he slips punches for sport. So far he's made foils of every opponent. I expect the same against Antonio Margarito for four or five rounds, but Antonio's intensity will reveal the chink in Clottey's armor: the intangible, who wants it more. I expect Margarito to grind Clottey down, win a unanimous decision and prove all that glitters is not gold ... Carlos Quintana, expected to be road kill for Colombian enfant terrible, Joel Julia, schooled the youngster with ease, sending him back to the minors for seasoning. Quintana never choked under the microscope seized the opportunity. He's no patsy; he's a confident, undefeated slickster with cojones, and a stiff enough straight left to keep Cotto honest, but it won't be enough. Cotto's too sound. Even stung, he doesn't un-glue -- uses his legs till he fires back to the head and body with the grouping of a marksman. He should do that with enough brio and precision to get a unanimous decision.
    Joe Rein

    This may possibly be the toughest fight of Miguel Cotto's career, but in the end, he will add a welterweight title to his list of achievements. Cotto by TKO ... Joshua Clottey has been impressive in his last several bouts, but he will face his toughest competition yet in Antonio Margarito. Clottey will be Margarito's seventh successful title defense. Margarito by TKO.
    Aaron Tallent

    Both headliners in Atlantic City have shown vulnerability, so fans could be in for some surprises. Besides looking very good against Joel Julio I don't know enough about Quintana to merit comment on anything besides Cotto's obvious current edge in star power. Top Rank's matchmaking is usually as solid as it gets, so unless there's a miscue it doesn't seem likely they'd risk tripping up a potential cash cow. Margarito may be avoided by top fighters, but to me that still looks more financially based (the name of the real game) than from fear. Projecting with no first hand injury information, Margarito seems like a lock (see previous matchmaking factor). Margarito may fall to injury, but it doesn't seem likely Clottey is the opponent to cause it. There's no classic marquee match-up here on paper but this looks like a great weekend of boxing shows. Let's always hope for the best, and thanks again to everyone who adds their own observations.
    Phil Woolever

  5. #35
    MANAGING EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    In an undisclosed bunker deep in the weird, wild, woods of the Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    11,450
    vCash
    500

    Re: Cotto-Quintana, Margarito-Clottey Pre-fight Press & Predictions

    High Stakes Fight for The Tijuana Tornado
    by German Villasenor from Max Boxing


    While all the other sanctioning bodies have seen their welterweight titles swapped around like musical chairs, WBO boss Antonio Margarito, the longest reigning titlist and some would argue the true welterweight champion, keeps on churning along.

    Margarito (33-4, 1 NC, 24 KOs) is set to defend his belt tonight against top rated challenger Joshua Clottey (30-1, 1 NC, 20 KOs) tonight at Boardwalk Hall in Atlantic City on a Showtime doubleheader also featuring Miguel Cotto moving up in weight to battle southpaw Carlos Quintana for the vacant WBA welterweight crown.

    In what could be his most important bout to dat,e Margarito is looking to make a statement, and should he win this bout as expected, his promotional machine, Top Rank, has stated he will be fighting no less that four times next year, with a million dollars per fight guarantee.

    The ''Tijuana Tornado'' has been looking for the big fights since winning his title back in March of 2002, with the big names finding every kind of way to avoid fighting the Tijuana resident. Perhaps Margarito's path of destruction, stopping all but one of his title challengers along the way, has something to do with it.

    In comes Clottey.

    The tough Ghanaian looks to be a tough nut to crack, as his only loss came via disqualification against Carlos Baldomir in a fight where he looked to be ahead two to three rounds on the cards at the time of stoppage.

    Beating Clottey is the key at this juncture in Margarito's career, but whether he outpoints or blows out the African fighter, he will surely get little respect from the naysayers. And should the unthinkable happen and he loses...his detractors and potential dance partners will use that as an excuse to write him off completely and justify not fighting him in the past or future.

    As widely reported, Margarito has had an odd camp for this bout, first having problems getting sparring partners (some literally running away when finding out who they were supposed to spar, others getting beat up early in training camp.). Then an ankle injury happened a couple of weeks ago, almost causing the bout to be called off.

    Surely Clottey knows this, and would Margarito do anything different in order to avoid re-injuring his ankle?

    ”I'm not fighting a defensive fight if it comes down to that,” said Margarito a day before leaving for Atlantic City. “I don't plan on doing anything different.”

    But what if Clottey tries to pressure that leg the way Kostya Tszyu did against a hurt Sharmba Mitchell in their first bout?

    ”If that's what he thinks he can do, then let him. I will deal with it - what is he gonna do, kick my leg? I will just fight my fight.”

    And what is the state of Margarito's ankle?

    “There's no problem with the leg, everything is fine thanks to my team.”

    As stated before, beating Clottey should finally make Margarito the marquee name which will net him the big fights. It’s something which Team Margarito thought finally would come about after his five round destruction of Kermit Cintron last year. So what can the champion look forward to after Saturday night?

    “I would like to unify my belt. I would like to do it against the winner of Cotto or Quintana, but sincerely speaking I would rather face Cotto, as he has the bigger name and the money to go with it in a unification fight.”

    Another attractive match-up could be a rematch against Cintron, who recently stopped Mark Suarez for the vacant IBF belt.

    ''I'm also willing to move up to 154 again to face a top name, namely someone like (Shane) Mosley, as (Oscar) De La Hoya will not happen anyway since he is already facing Mayweather.”

    Margarito vs Mosley could very well happen, as there have been rumblings about it in the past months. But first things first, and he cannot overlook Clottey, as any future plans can easily come crashing down with a loss.

  6. #36
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Louisville,ky
    Posts
    1,556
    vCash
    500

    Re: Cotto-Quintana, Margarito-Clottey Pre-fight Press & Predictions

    I know some people don't like Cotto. I like Cotto heart. He's been hurt and on the canvas but came back to win. I like that in a fighter. Speed,power,and heart is hard to beat. I going with Cotto.

  7. #37
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    180
    vCash
    500

    Re: Cotto-Quintana, Margarito-Clottey Pre-fight Press & Predictions

    Quote Originally Posted by mrbig1
    I know some people don't like Cotto. I like Cotto heart. He's been hurt and on the canvas but came back to win. I like that in a fighter. Speed,power,and heart is hard to beat. I going with Cotto.
    I agree. Quintana is a real good fighter. What Cotto did is impressive.

+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
News Current Champs WAIL! Encyclopedia Links Home