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Thread: The Greatest Junior Lightweights of All Time

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    The Greatest Junior Lightweights of All Time

    The Greatest Junior Lightweights of All Time
    By Brent Matteo Alderson from Boxing Scene

    1. Floyd Mayweather- Statistically, Mayweather, Arguello, and Chavez are very similar. Both Chavez and Mayweather successfully defended their titles on nine different occasions during the course of three year reigns while Arguello defended his title on eight different occasions during the course of 2 Ĺ years. At 130 pounds Mayweather defeated four men who had either been title holders or would become organizational champions while Chavez defeated three and Arguello four. None of the aforementioned fighters officially unified the title, but Floyd fought and beat Diego Corrales who had impressively reigned as the IBF 130 pound champion for over a year prior to facing Floyd and was unjustly stripped of the title due to political shenanigans.

    Floyd should be ranked first because of his dominance at the weight, his longevity, and quality of opposition. He won the title from Genaro Hernandez, a man who had accumulated twelve title fight wins of his own and who had never lost at the weight. Then he immediately defended it against Angel Manfredy who had just stopped Gatti and who was on a 17-fight win streak. Then he dominated an undefeated Diego Corrales, a man who was viewed as one of the ten best pound for pound fighters in the world.

    2. A number of people, discredit that win and claim that Diego was weak from making weight, but I disagree with that assertion. After serving time in Prison for spousal abuse, Diego Corrales went back down to 130 pounds and even weighed in the 120ís for his first bout with Casamayor. If Diego had such a hard time making 130, then why did he continue to fight at that weight years later when his body was more mature? I think the boxing establishmentís criticisms of Roy Jonesís victory over James Toney and Floyd Mayweatherís over Corrales are retaliatory since members of the media were perturbed by how both Mayweather and Jones started acting more like managers and not hall of fame fighters trying to establish a lasting legacy.

    Still Floyd didnít duck anybody at 130 and should be ranked as the divisionís best champion because he dominated a quality group of challengers and wasnít tested until after he moved up to Lightweight and none of the other champions on this list dominated to the extent in which the Pretty Boy did, and thatís why heís the greatest junior-lightweight in history.

    3. Alexis Arguello - The battle for the second place spot between Chavez and Arguello was a lot closer than the battle for the top spot between Mayweather and Arguello due to the fact that Arguello was an exceptional fighter and an exceptional champion. Arguello won the title from the formidable Alfredo Escalera, who himself had made ten defenses of the WBC 130 pound title, and defended it on eight different occasions. His list of knockout victims as WBC 130 pound champ include Bobby Chacon, Boza Edwards, and Bazooka Limon, three men that ended up trading the title around for a three year period after Arguello moved up to Lightweight. Of his eight challengers, only Arturo Leon lasted the route. Also, Arguello had major physical advantages at 130 pounds. He had a 76-inch reach, a very good chin, excellent conditioning, and a huge heart.

    4. Julio Cesar Chavez- Chavez won the vacant WBC 130 pound title when he was 22-years old when he defeated Mario Martinez for the vacant title. He then proceeded to defend the title on nine different occasions during the course of a three year reign and a number of those wins came against quality fighters such as Rocky Lockridge, Juan LaPorte, and Ruben Castillo. The main reason that I ranked Chavez below Mayweather and Arguello is due to the fact that he wasnít as dominant of a champion even though he left the division with a record of 56-0. The fights with Lockridge and LaPorte were razor thin decisions and Chavez himself commented after his victory over LaPorte that the decision could have gone either way and one judge had the Lockridge fight a draw. Also Floyd and Arguello beat respected champions in Genaro Hernandez and Alfredo Escalera while Chavez beat the unproven Martinez. Still unlike most fighters Chavez seemed to improve as he rose in weight and even though he didnít stay at Lightweight that long, I feel like Chavez was at his best at 135, just watch his fights with Edwin Rosario and Jose Luis Ramirez.

    5. Azumah Nelson- Consistency, longevity, class. What more can you say about Azumah Nelson? From the time Nelson beat Mario Martinez for the vacant WBC title in 1988 until he finally lost the title for the last time in 1997, the Professor left an indelible mark on the division and established himself as one of the greatest 130 pounders in history. In all he defended the WBC title on eleven different occasions and during that time he dotted his resume with a number of well regarded pugilists. Title fight victims include Jeff Fenech, Jesse James Leija, Gabriel Ruelas, Mario Martinez, Juan LaPorte, and Calvin Grove. And after earning a dubious draw in his first fight against Jeff Fenech, undoubtedly the greatest fighter in Australian history, Nelson went over to Melbourne and handed the tough Aussie his first loss and erased the controversy surrounding their first fight. Then at the age of 37, after having lost his title in his previous fight nineteen months before, he came back to knockout Gabe Ruelas in five rounds and then validated his position as the best 130 pounder in the world by knocking out Leija, the man who had taken his title.

    Quite simply Nelson was a great fighter, but his dominance and sub-par performances hurt his ranking. He looked awful in his title winning victory over Mario Martinez and won by split decision and almost everyone who saw his first fight with Fenech feels he lost. Also, most observers felt he lost the first fight with Leija, which was declared a draw, and his first victory over Ruelas was by majority decision. Still these are all very good world class fighters and having the type of success that Azumah had against these types of fighters is an accomplishment and secures his place among the 130 pound greats.

    6. Flash Elorde - Along with Manny Pacquiao, Elorde is considered to be the greatest fighter in Philipino history. He was a quick southpaw with a powerful left hand and had seventy fights before he won the title. He reigned for seven years, a division record, as undisputed champion and made ten successful defenses. During his reign as champion he lost in title tries to Sandy Saddler and Carlos Ortiz for the featherweight and Lightweight World Championships. Today thanks to Pacquioaís success, people are starting to remember what a fine champion Flash was and a couple of years ago, Nigel Collins, the editor of Ring Magazine, went over to the Philippines for an award ceremony involving the Pac-Man and the government cleared up Elordeís grave site and conducted a special ceremony commemorating his career .
    7. Brian Mitchell - Brian Mitchell successfully defended his title twelve times, which is the divisionís record for consecutive successful title defenses. He also beat his IBF counterpart, Toney Lopez, the second time they fought in September of 1991 after having fought to a draw the first time. He won the title from the ordinary Afredo Layne and besides title fight wins over Tony Lopez, Jim McDonnell, and Frankie Mitchel, most of the guys were no-hopers. Still, Mitchell beat a very good fighter in Tony Lopez and only lost once in a career that spanned 49 fights and avenged that loss early in his career. The problem that historians have with ranking Mitchell higher is that during much of the time that he was WBA champ, Azumah Nelson was his WBC counterpart and odds makers would have made the Ghanaian at least a two to one favorite to beat the South African. Mitchell probably deserves more accolades than heís given, but being the sixth best champion in a divisionís history isnít such a bad thing.

    8. Genaro Hernandez - Won the WBA title that was stripped from Brian Mitchell for taking a return match with Tony Lopez and successfully defended it on eight different occasions. Then he vacated the title to move up to challenge Oscar De La Hoya at Lightweight in 1995. After getting stopped by De La Hoya in six, he beat an old, but still dangerous Azumah Nelson for the WBC title in 97 and defended it three times, which included a twelve round decision over future title holder Carlos Hernandez. He lost that title to Floyd Mayweather. In all he made eleven defenses during the course of two different reigns and only lost twice in his career and those were to two future hall of famers.

    9. Tod Morgan - Many of Morganís bouts are undocumented and his record is in concise, but he first laid claim to the 130 pound title in 1925 and lost it in 1929 and along with Flash Elorde was one of the champions that helped legitimize and establish the division.

    10. Alfredo Escalera- Escalera made ten defenses during a two and a half year reign against average opposition and lost his WBC title in a thrilling shoot out with Alexis Arguello, which is partly the reason why heís rated so highly on the list.

    11. Sammy Serrano - Was the WBA champ from 76 Ė 83 on two different occasions and made 13 defenses of the title.

    12. Tony Lopez - Tony the Tiger won the IBF 130 pound title in Ring Magazineís fight of the year in a bout with Rocky Lockridge. Then after defending the title three times, two of which were against Lockgridge and John John Molina, he lost the title to Molina. Then he regained the title and defended it three more times, one of which was a draw with WBA champion Brian Mitchell, before losing the title in his second fight with Mitchell. Generally Tony isnít regarded that highly from a historical standpoint, but he beat two good fighters in Lockridge and Molina and deserves to be mentioned with the best 130 pounders in history.

    13. Acelino Freitas - Freitasís career was kind of a disappointment. He started his career out with 29 consecutive knockouts and one of those was a spectacular first round title winning knockout of the very formidable Anatoly Alexandrov. Afterwards Alexandrov layed unconscious for five minutes and had to be taken out on a stretcher. Something happened to Freitas when he started to fight better competition outside of his native Brazil and he looked sloppy almost every time I saw him fight. Plus he held the WBO title, which I still consider to be a rung below the big three in terms of profitability and prestige. Still the Brazilian superstar whose wedding was televised on national television made ten successful defenses of the title and partially unified the title with a razor thin decision victory over Joel Casamayor. He also beat Javier Jauregui, Juan Carlos Ramirez, and Jorge Barrios in a stunning come from behind victory. At this weight I would have to rate his historical legacy ahead of Corralesís even though Diego eventually knocked him out due to the fact that they fought at 135 pounds. I still think Corrales would have beaten Freitas at 130, but you canít give too many points to speculation and Acelinoís numbers and accomplishments substantially outnumber Diegoís at 130.

    Honorable Mention:

    Diego Corrales-I wanted to put Diego on the list, but he was only IBF champion for about a year and WBO champ for even a shorter time and really didnít get a chance to establish his legacy partly due to his conviction and partly because Floyd Mayweather was there. Still when Corrales was at his best he was a sharpshooter and Iíd probably pick him against half the guys on this list.

    Arturo Gatti - Gatti first established himself as one of boxingís great warriors during his stint as the IBF 130 pound titlist. His fights with Patterson, Rodriguez, and Ruelas were awe-inspiring, but quite frankly Gatti wasnít that good of a 130 pounder and in all likelihood would have lost to Genaro Hernandez and Azumah Nelson.

    I almost forgot about Morales and Barrera being 130 pound champs, but Iím not really sure those two guys have a meaningful legacy at 130 pounds. Their most important body of work occurred south of 130 pounds. Still Barrera has been the 130 pound champ for a while now and a win over the Pac-man in a return match would put him on the list.

    John John Molina was a tough cookie and was real close to making the cut.

    Sandly Saddler held the Junior Lightweight title and Iím sure he could have beaten almost all of the fighers on this list, but he only had three title fights against non-descript opponents at the weight so I didnít include him on the list. Itís hard to rank guys when they just stopped in the division for a pit stop. For instance look at Roy Jones, he beat Hopkins and took Thomas Tate out in two rounds at Middleweight, but we canít rate him with the middleweight greats because he didnít have any type of longevity at the weight. Same goes for Sugar Ray Leonard. He was awesome when he beat Ayub Kalule, but you canít rank him with the best 154 pounders in history even though he would have beaten any 154 pounder you care to name.

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    Re: The Greatest Junior Lightweights of All Time

    I'd only ask about Lopez as compared to Molina. Seeing as how JJ deserved the win in two of their 3 bouts... COULD have been seen to win their third bout if one used the rationale to explain a Molina win oft-used for Lopez at home, which reads: "you could make the case Lopez won".

    Neither one was past it when they met.

    Of course, this is merely a humble question.... not a criticism. Maybe someone could also weigh in with their opinion of where Mario Martinez may rate. It was the consideration of many that he beat Nelson for example in their vacant clash, but my opinion is just that and the conjecture of such isn't meant to end such a discussion, but promote it.
    Last edited by Sharkey; 10-27-2006 at 12:54 PM.

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    Re: The Greatest Junior Lightweights of All Time

    I find it unbelievable that he did not include, Benny "Little Fish" Bass & Kid Chocolate. Two absolutely tremendous fighters.

    As to Mario Martinez, for some reason I've never have seen a fight of his so I really can't comment.

    GorDoom

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    Re: The Greatest Junior Lightweights of All Time

    The auther was clearly bias towards modern fighters.

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    Re: The Greatest Junior Lightweights of All Time

    Quote Originally Posted by lu047w
    The auther was clearly bias towards modern fighters.
    You got that right.

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    Re: The Greatest Junior Lightweights of All Time

    and 'champions'.

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    Re: The Greatest Junior Lightweights of All Time

    Quote Originally Posted by Sharkey
    and 'champions'.
    You mean alphabet belt holders.

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    Re: The Greatest Junior Lightweights of All Time

    I believe that's what Shark meant when he put "champion's" in quotes. It really is sad how some of the long ago greats are completely forgotten. I'm going to post a short bio I did on Bass back in the 90's.

    GorDoom

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    Re: The Greatest Junior Lightweights of All Time

    Cyber Boxing Bio -- Benny "Little Fish" Bass

    Career Record (excluding "no decisions") -- W-151; L-28; D-5

    Regarding Benny Bass, Jack Dempsey was quoted as saying: "He is the greatest fighter of his weight and inches I have ever set my eyes upon."

    At a diminutive 5' 2", Benny possessed a bull neck and extraordinary musculature around his shoulders & biceps. He was a powerful force & rarely fought at over 130 pounds. Bass was one of the hardest punchers ever in the featherweight & jr. lightweight divisions.

    Contemporary Ring Magazine writer, Francis Albertani, described Benny as "A deadly puncher, cool as the proverbial pebble under fire & a masterful boxer."

    Born December 4, 1904, in Kiev, Russia, Benny and family emigrated to the U.S. in 1906 settling in Philadelphia. By the age of 15, Benny began his amateur career, winning 95 out of an estimated 100 bouts. He earned a shot at representing the U.S. in the Olympics but lost a heated decision to future world flyweight champion Frankie Genaro in the box-offs in New York City. Genaro went on to win the gold medal at flyweight in the 1920 Olympics.

    Benny turned pro in 1921 under the tutelage of Phil Glassman who also handled the quintessential Philadelphia fighter, the great Lew Tendler. Within a year he was fighting main events against the cream of the featherweight division. Before the end of his first year as a pro, he faced & held his own with top contenders such as Johnny Dixon (ND-10), Pete Sarmiento (ND-10), losing only to the ferocious "Mexican Bobcat" Bobby Garcia in a close decision (L-6).

    Over the next three years Benny rocked and socked his way to an outstanding record of 53-4 with 1 NC, 2-Draws & 13 ND. Then, in 1922, the great featherweight champion, Lewis "Kid" Kaplan resigned the featherweight title due to weight problems leaving a small group of contenders to vie for the vacant crown. The N.B.A. matched Benny with a leading contender, Morris Kaplan, whose nom de guerre was Red Chapman. Chapman was a mauling bruising in-fighter who had previously lost to Bass (WF-1).

    By the time Benny and Chapman squared off for the vacant N.B.A. featherweight title on September 19th in Philadelphia, Bass had evolved into a great fighter who had already cleaned out the featherweight division, as proven by solid victories over top contenders like: Mickey Doyle (KO-5), Eddie Anderson (D-10, W-10, W-12), Joey Glick (W-10, NC-3, W-10), & Babe Herman (W-10, D-12).

    Harold Ribalow, in The Jew In American Sports, wrote this about the Bass-Chapman fight: "Its savagery, its skill & its pace have seldom been equaled by anyone."

    As if to belie the maelstrom to come, the fight started slowly. Over the first two rounds the opponents cautiously felt each other out. In the third, the pace was accelerated greatly & maintained for the rest of the fight. Brawling on the inside, they inadvertently clashed heads & Bass' right eyelid was severely lacerated. Chapman began trying to zero in on the damaged orb, but Benny used his considerable store of boxing skills too keep Chapman at bay & avoid further severe damage too the eyelid. By the seventh round, giving as good as he was getting, Benny opened a severe gash over one of Chapman's eyes.

    The ninth round of the fight ranks as one of the great rounds in the annals of fistiana -- right up there with Dempsey-Willard (round 1), Dempsey-Firpo (round 1), Louis-Schmelling II (round 1), Hagler-Hearns (round-1) & Holyfield-Bowe I (round 10).

    Both fighters exploded out of their respective corners at the bell. Colliding mid-ring, they both threw wild looping overhand rights that landed simultaneously.

    Both fighters fell to the canvass as if pole axed. Double knockdowns are rare events in boxing and the crowd & referee were stunned. The referee began the count and Benny shakily rose from the canvass on quivering legs at the count of two. The glassy eyed & very hurt Chapman managed to get to his feet at the count of nine. Both thoroughly dazed fighters, operating on pure fighting instinct, threw themselves at each other in a furiously sustained barrage of leather.

    At the end of the exchange Benny landed another hard right hand and Chapman went down. To the amazement of the 30,000 fans who had filled Shibes Park, Chapman somehow managed to regain his feet before the count of 10 and again the fighters threw themselves at each other in a hellaciously wild exchange that was maintained until the conclusion of the round.

    By the mid-point of the 10th round both fighters were bloodied, grisly zombies, fighting on empty, with nothing but sheer will too maintain them. Ribalow describes the scene at the end of the fight: " Bass was in bad shape. His eye was badly bruised & his own blood was mixed with Chapman's blood. . . Chapman was completely covered with dried blood, which glistened where his perspiration met with blood. His teeth were out in a perpetual snarl & he moved with the deliberation of a sleepwalker. He threw punches he was unconscious of throwing & Bass ducked them with a casualness born of fatigue. Yet Bass seemed a bit more alert than Chapman & when the bell rang he seemed more human, more alive." Upon winning the well deserved decision Benny Bass became the featherweight champion of the world.

    Incredibly, a month later, on October 17th, Benny hopped into the ring against the very tough Mike Ballerino (W-10). He closed out the year with two fights in December. On the 9th he met Johnny Farr (W-10), and on the 13th Johnny Sheppard (W-10).

    Never one to sit around resting on his laurels, Benny engaged in three matches the next January, beginning on the 3rd!

    On February 10th, he faced the immortal Tony Canzoneri in New York City for the undisputed world title. Even though he lost a 15 round decision along with his title, Bass covered himself with fistic glory in a display of courage & stamina seldom seen before or since in the squared circle.

    During the third round of the encounter Bass somehow got his collarbone broken in five places. This kind of injury is excruciatingly painful making even something as simple as clenching your fists & holding them up agonizing.

    Benny somehow not only mustered the will too fight on for another 12 rounds; but from the 10th round on, he mounted a furious rally & almost pulled out of an extremely close 15 round split decision loss! Too accomplish this, against a fighter in his prime who was as great as Canzoneri, was a remarkable feat.

    Following the loss of his title Benny took four months off to recuperate. His return to the ring against a fighter he had previously beaten named Peter Nebo was unsuccessful (L-10). In his next bout on September 10th, he met Harry Blitman, a hot, undefeated and rapidly rising contender. The fight, billed as being for the combined featherweight titles of Pennsylvania & the Jewish championship of Philadelphia was a real grudge match.

    Blitman, a rugged southpaw, discarded all pretenses of boxing skill & went after the "Little Fish" as if he was the starving lion of Judah & attempted to go toe to toe. This proved a terminal mistake for young Harry. Benny slowed him to a crawl in the very first round with damaging left hooks to the liver, by the 6th round Blitman was totally on queer street when Benny landed two thudding overhand rights to the head & flattened Blitman. Harry was unconscious for a long time after his handlers dragged him back to his corner. Harry Blitman fought on for three more years, but was never the same again after the beating he absorbed from Benny.

    On December 19th 1929 Benny challenged flashy boxer-puncher Todd Morgan for the jr. lightweight title. Morgan was an excellent fighter who had held the crown for four years defending it successfully 7 times.

    For the majority of the first round Morgan held the tiny "Little Fish" at bay stabbing him with lightning lefts. Right before the end of the round Morgan caught Benny with a thundering right cross that sent him reeling into the ropes. Seconds before the bell, Morgan slammed home another right that badly hurt Benny who was barely able to stagger back to his corner.

    Once again displaying his remarkable recuperative powers, Benny roared out of his corner at the bell for round 2. He bulled Morgan around the ring & then dropped him with a heavy right cross flush on the jaw. Morgan struggled to his feet at the count of nine only too be met by an even more thunderous right hand. At the count of ten, Benny "Little Fish" Bass was the new world jr. lightweight champion.

    Benny didn't defend his crown in 1930, but he still fought regularly. His highlight of the year was a ten round decision over future jr. welterweight champion Johnny Jadick & the lowlight was a 10-round decision loss in a non-title rematch with Tony Canzoneri.

    The first KO loss of Benny's career came in his first defense of his title against Kid Chocolate on July 15th 1931 (his only other KO loss was 6 years later, when he was well past his prime, against Henry Armstrong (KO by 4). Benny was more than holding his own against Chocolate when a very deep gash was opened over Benny's left eye and the contest was stopped in the 7th.

    Benny never got a chance to regain his title and although he continued to fight for another ten years, his career as a first echelon prizefighter was pretty much over. He retired after two consecutive 10 round losses in 1940. After all the years of blood and effort Benny was dead broke. As Benny put it: "Everybody who needed money got it from me".

    Benny was no dummy, however, and even though he lacked much formal scholastic training he had a sharp mind, as evinced by his fluency in five languages. Applying himself with the same resolve he had displayed in the ring, Benny passed a Civil Service exam and worked a desk job for the Philadelphia traffic courts for many years.

    Benny "Little Fish" Bass died of heart complications on June 25, 1974. Among the world champions he face during his boxing career were: Tony Canzoneri (L-15, L-10), Todd Morgan (KO-2), Johnny Jadick (W-10, W-10), Bud Taylor (KO-2), Kid Chocolate (TKO BY 7), Petey Sarron (LF-6, L-10) Red Cochrane (W-10) & Henry Armstrong (KO by 4).

    He is enshrined in the Pennsylvania Boxing Hall Of Fame.

    GorDoom

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    Re: The Greatest Junior Lightweights of All Time

    Alexis Arguello is a great choice, but, if you're talking about the greatest fighter who could ever have come in under 130, on a "who-would-have-beaten-whom" basis (as opposed to an "accomplishments in the division" basis), then I'd like to toss in votes for Henry Armstrong and Tony Canzoneri as well.

    Also, I wouldn't be surprised if guys like Jim Driscoll, Willie Pep and Sandy Saddler, even at 126, could have beaten most of the 130-pounders on that list.

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    Gabriel

    It's Flash Elorde alone at the top and then everyone else.

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    Re: The Greatest Junior Lightweights of All Time

    Flash is one of my childhood icons. A great fighter with no doubt. & Karl is right you can certainly make a case for him being #1. & if he isn't, he HAS to be in the top three.

    GorDoom

    Cyber Boxing Champion
    Gabriel "Flash" Elorde

    Born: March 25, 1935 Bogu, Philippines
    Died: January 2, 1985 ManilaPro Record: 88-27-2 (33 Kayos)

    1951
    Jun 16 Kid Gonzaga Cebu City, Philippines KO 4
    Jun 23 Young Basiliano Cebu City, Philippines KO 3
    Jun 30 Mike Sanchez Cebu City, Philippines W 5
    Jul 14 Kid Santos Cebu City, Philippines KO 5
    Jul 28 Star Mercado Cebu City, Philippines KO 1
    Aug 11 Fighting Chavez Cebu City, Philippines KO 1
    Aug 20 Fighting Chavez Cebu City, Philippines KO 7
    Sep 8 Little Patilla Cebu City, Philippines KO 6
    Sep 15 Star Flores Cebu City, Philippines W 10
    Oct 16 Kid Independence Cebu City, Philippines KO by 10
    Dec 1 Lucky Strike Cebu City, Philippines KO 5

    1952
    Jan 30 Tenejeros Boy Davao City, Philippines W 8
    Feb 24 Little Dundee Davao City, Philippines L 8
    Mar 16 Tommy Romulo Davao City, Philippines D 10
    May 3 Bennny Escobar Caloocan, Philippines W 8
    May 10 Paulito Escarlan Caloocan, Philippines W 6
    May 31 Tanny Campo Caloocan, Philippines W 8
    Jul 26 Tanny Campo Manila W 12
    (Wins Filipino Bantamweight Title)
    Aug 12 Little Dundee Davao City, Philippines KO 4
    (Retains Filipino Bantamweight Title)
    Oct 18 Hiroshi Horigushi Tokyo W 12
    (Wins Oriental Bantamweight Title)
    Nov 18 Akiyoshi Akanuma Tokyo D 10

    1953
    Feb 18 Willie Brown Manila KO 4
    Mar 15 Al Cruz Manila W 10
    May 20 Larry Bataan Manila L 12
    (For Oriental Featherweight Title)
    Jul 6 Akiyoshi Akanuma Tokyo W 12
    (Retains Oriental Bantamweight Title)
    Aug 8 Shigeji Kaneko Tokyo L 10
    Oct 8 Noburo Tanaka Tokyo W 10
    Nov 25 Masashi Akiyama Tokyo L 10
    (For Japanese Featherweight Title)

    1954
    Jan 21 Kiyoaki Nakanishi Tokyo W 10
    Apr 21 Hiroshi Okawa Tokyo W 10
    Jun Relinquishes Oriental Bantamweight Title)
    Jun 29 Shigeji Kaneko Tokyo L 12
    (For Oriental Featherweight Title)
    Aug 5 Roy Higa Tokyo W 10
    Aug 18 Tommy Romulo Manila W 12
    (Wins Filipino Jr. Lightweight Title)
    Nov 20 Katsumi Kosaka Manila KO 8
    Nov 27 Masashi Akiyama Manila W 10

    1955
    Jan 12 Masashi Akiyama Tokyo L 10
    Apr 15 Severo Fuentes Manila W 10
    Jun 15 Leo Alonzo Manila L 12
    (For Filipino Lightweight Title)
    Jul 20 Sandy Saddler Manila W 10
    Oct 3 Shigeji Kaneko Tokyo L 10

    1956
    Jan 18 Sandy Saddler San Francisco TKO by 13
    (For World Featherweight Title)
    Apr 23 Cleo Lane San Francisco KO 1
    May 8 Chico Rosa Stockton, CA W 10
    Jun 11 Gil Velarde San Francisco KO 7
    Jun 26 Cecil Schoonmaker Stockton, CA KO 9
    Jul 24 Dave Gallardo San Jose, CA W 10
    Aug 22 Miguel Berrios San Francisco L 10
    Oct 16 Luke Sandoval San Jose, CA KO 2
    Nov 9 Miguel Berios New York L 10

    1957
    Feb 5 Hidemi Wada Osaka, Japan KO 5
    Mar 16 Tommy Romulo Manila W 12
    (Retains Filipino Jr. Lightweight Title)
    Apr 27 Hideto Kobayashi Nagoya, Japan W 12
    (Wins Oriental Lightweight Title)
    Jun 23 Omsap Laempapha Bangkok L 12
    (Loses Oriental Lightweight Title)
    Aug 4 Salika Yontrakit Bangkok KO 3
    Sep 24 Shigeji Kaneko Tokyo L 10
    Oct 23 Leo Alonzo Manila W 12
    (Retains Filipino Jr. Lightweight Title)

    1958
    Mar 2 Hiroshi Okawa Tokyo W 12
    (Regains Oriental Lightweight Title)
    May 3 Javellana Kid Manila W 12
    (Wins Oriental Jr. Lightweight Title)
    Jun 10 Ike Chestnut Honolulu W 10
    Sep 2 Hisao Kobayashi Tokyo W 12
    (Retains Oriental Lightweight Title)
    Nov 15 Keiichi Ichikawa Manila KO 6
    (Retains Oriental Jr. Lightweight Title)
    Dec 27 Kiyoaki Nakanishi Manila KO 3

    1959
    Feb 6 Takeo Sugimori Tokyo W 12
    (Retains Oriental Lightweight Title)
    Feb 23 Paolo Rosi San Francisco L 10
    Mar 31 Teddy Davis Stockton, CA W 10
    May 25 Sonny Leon Caracas, Venezuela W 10
    Jun 15 Vicente Rivas Caracas, Venezuela L 10
    Jul 29 Solomon Boysaw Cleveland L 10
    Oct 7 Hisao Kobayashi Tokyo W 12
    (Retains Oriental Lightweight Title)
    Nov 26 Isami Ikeyama Tokyo KO 4
    Dec 15 Nursery Kid Manila W 10

    1960
    Mar 16 Harold Gomes Quezon City, PhilippinesKO 7
    (Wins World Jr. Lightweight Title)
    Jul 9 Hachiro Ito Manila KO 5
    Aug 17 Harold Gomes San Francisco KO 1
    (Retains World Jr. Lightweight Title)
    Oct 17 Sakuzi Shinozawa Manila W 12
    (Retains Oriental Lightweight Title)
    Dec 16 Vicente Rivas Manila W 10

    1961
    Mar 19 Joey Lopes Manila W 15
    (Retains World Jr. Lightweight Title)
    May 31 Giordano Campari Manila W 10
    Sep 2 Teruo Kosaka Manila W 12
    (Retains Oriental Lightweight Title)
    Dec 16 Sergio Caprari Manila KO 1
    (Retains World Jr. Lightweight Title)

    1962
    Mar 10 Somkiat Katmuangyon Manila KO 2
    (Retains Oriental Lightweight Title)
    Apr 30 Teruo Kosaka Tokyo L 12
    (Loses Oriental Lightweight Title)
    Jun 23 Auburn Copeland Manila W 15
    (Retains World Jr. Lightweight Title)
    Aug 4 Teruo Kosaka Cebu City, Philippines W 12
    (Regains Oriental Lightweight Title)
    Nov 17 Isarasak Puntainorasing Manila KO 3
    Dec 21 Solomon Boysaw Manila W 10

    1963
    Feb 16 Johnny Bizzarro Manila W 15
    (Retains World Jr. Lightweight Title)
    Jun 1 Tsunstomi Miyamoto Manila KO 9
    (Retains Oriental Lightweight Title)
    Aug 3 Love Allotey Manila W 10
    Nov 16 Love Allotey Quezon City, PhilippinesWDQ 11
    (Retains World Jr. Lightweight Title)

    1964
    Feb 15 Carlos Ortiz Manila KO by 14
    (For World Lightweight Title)
    May 8 Tadashi Matsumoto Manila W 12
    (Retains Oriental Lightweight Title)
    Jul 27 Teruo Kosaka Tokyo KO 12
    (Retains World Jr. Lightweight Title)
    Nov 21 Kang-Il Suh Manila W 12
    (Retains Oriental Lightweight Title)

    1965
    Feb 27 Rene Barrientos Manila W 12
    (Retains Oriental Lightweight Title)
    Jun 5 Teruo Kosaka Quezon City, PhilippinesKO 15
    (Retains World Jr. Lightweight Title)
    Aug 5 Frankie Narvaez New York W 10
    Dec 4 Kang-Il Suh Manila W 15
    (Retains World Jr. Lightweight Title)

    1966
    Mar 19 Ismael Laguna Tokyo W 10
    Jun 9 Yoshiaki Numata Tokyo L 12
    (Loses Oriental Lightweight Title)
    Aug 7 Percy Hayles Quezon City, PhilippinesW 10
    Oct 22 Vicente Derado Quezon City, PhilippinesW 15
    (Retains World Jr. Lightweight Title)
    Nov 28 Carlos Ortiz New York KO by 14
    (For World Lightweight Title)

    1967
    Feb 2 Kang-Il Suh Manila W 10
    Apr 25 Fujio Mikami Honolulu W 10
    Jun 15 Yoshiaki Numata Tokyo L 15
    (Loses World Jr. Lightweight Title)
    Oct 28 Akihisa Someya Manila L 10

    1968
    Inactive

    1969
    Feb 15 Eugenio Espinoza Quito, Ecuador L 10
    Apr 26 Jaguar Kakizawa Quezon City, PhilippinesL 10

    1970
    Apr 10 Mongai Munchai Manila KO 5
    May 16 Isao Ichihara Davao City, Philippines KO 9
    Jun 27 Kenji Iwata Manila W 10
    Aug 28 Cisco Andrade Manila KO 5
    Oct 31 Tatsunao Mitsuyama Quezon City, PhilippinesW 10
    Dec 18 Isao Ichihara Manila L 10

    1971
    Feb 14 Isao Ichihara Quezon City, PhilippinesKO 6
    May 20 Hiroyuki Murakami Tokyo L 10

  13. #13
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    Re: The Greatest Junior Lightweights of All Time

    Elorde and Arguello go 1 & 2.

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    Re: The Greatest Junior Lightweights of All Time

    The Greatest Junior Lightweights of All Time
    By Brent Matteo Alderson from Boxing Scene


    Man! I suggest that Brent lurk on the CBZ for a time so he can get a better sense of history!

    Johnny Dundee, Kid Chocolate, Frankie Klick, Hiroshi Kobayashi, beat his top and no. 3 Alexis (who was no. 2?)

    Carlos Hernandez beats 4 of his top ten easy and Bobby Chacon on a good night is favored over 5 of them!

    And why exclude Saddler -- only 3 defense true but probably over 100 fights at the weight!

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    Southpaw Flash

    Thanks, Bucket.
    Many historians regard Flash as being not only the greatest Filipino fighter ever, but the greatest Oriental boxer ever as well, and that includes Fighting Harada, Masao Ohba, Pone Kingpetch, Yoko Gushiken, Kuniaki Shibata, and other terrific boxers.
    Not only that, he is regarded by many as being the greatest southpaw of all time with due respect to Young Corbett, Marvin Hagler, and Pernell Whitaker on that particular list.
    Karl

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    Re: The Greatest Junior Lightweights of All Time

    Without a doubt the greatest Filipino fighter ever. & you're right a very good case can be made for him as greatest Asian fighter. For me it's between Elorde & Harada, They were both among the all-time greats of any era.

    In my estimation they are #1 & #1A as best Asian fighter. They were both among the greatest ever in their divisions.

    The fact that Harada beat Jofre twice, even a depleted one, vaults him up there with Elorde.

    GorDoom

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    Re: The Greatest Junior Lightweights of All Time

    i hate lists. we are all biased in some way. what i saw was on the west coast.

    i have to give bobby chacon at least an honorable mention just for the fact that his fights with limon and edwards were some of the greatest i have ever seen. and i may catch hell for this but....i think he would have beat the shit out of acelino freitas.
    greg

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    Re: The Greatest Junior Lightweights of All Time

    Quote Originally Posted by gregbeyer
    i hate lists. we are all biased in some way. what i saw was on the west coast.

    i have to give bobby chacon at least an honorable mention just for the fact that his fights with limon and edwards were some of the greatest i have ever seen. and i may catch hell for this but....i think he would have beat the shit out of acelino freitas.
    greg
    Great call, Greg.
    His first fight with Boza was one of the most brutal I have ever seen as well.
    I think most all of us here on the CBZ would agree that Bobby Chacon is the Undisputed Most Exciting Junior Lightweight Champion Ever.
    Karl

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    Re: The Greatest Junior Lightweights of All Time

    I agree also but you could include Boza & Bazooka with him. All 3 were blood & guts warriors & their round robin of fights were classics!

    But I'd still put my money on Elorde.

    GorDoom

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    Re: The Greatest Junior Lightweights of All Time

    If you rate Alfredo Escalera No. 10, where does that put 36-1 lefty Tyrone Everett, of Philly, who kicked Escalera's backside for at least 10 out of the 15 rounds they fought in 1976 in Philly, only to get screwed when the local judge, whose brother worked at a race track in Puerto Rico, was TOLD--and compensated--to vote against Everett. He never judged another fight. Everett was shot and killed six months later.

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    Escalera

    Quote Originally Posted by wolgast
    If you rate Alfredo Escalera No. 10, where does that put 36-1 lefty Tyrone Everett, of Philly, who kicked Escalera's backside for at least 10 out of the 15 rounds they fought in 1976 in Philly, only to get screwed when the local judge, whose brother worked at a race track in Puerto Rico, was TOLD--and compensated--to vote against Everett. He never judged another fight. Everett was shot and killed six months later.
    Sorry, wolgast.
    No way IMO did Ty win that fight.
    He ran the whole way and in no way ever came close to capturing the title from El Salsero.
    Karl

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    Re: The Greatest Junior Lightweights of All Time

    funny, the decision in everett-escalera is considered one of the 10 worst of all time, but you felt escalera won. thank god you're not judging fights for a living.

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    Hey now

    given how the written word can be interpreted the wrong way..

    I'm sure Karl could judge a fight fairly well.. just as I am sure Wolgast is within his right to think Everett won. There seems to be room for both points to survive in a disagreement.
    Last edited by Sharkey; 10-31-2006 at 10:46 AM.

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    Re: The Greatest Junior Lightweights of All Time

    To each his own.
    Karl
    Last edited by StingerKarl; 11-01-2006 at 09:50 AM.

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    Re: The Greatest Junior Lightweights of All Time

    In the original list in post #1, Floyd Mayweather Jr. is considered #1 AND #2 apparently.

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    Re: The Greatest Junior Lightweights of All Time

    I'll take Arguello at 130 against anybody.

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    Re: The Greatest Junior Lightweights of All Time

    I dont know who might be the greatest, but Flash Elorde in the films Ive seen of him when he was in his prime, especially against Sandy Saddler, was a great great boxer and fast as anybody in hand speed, movement, combo hitting, etc.
    He was something.

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    Re: The Greatest Junior Lightweights of All Time

    Funny thing Rocky, Every fight I saw of Elorde he got beat. Saddler, Berrios, Solomon Boysaw all seen on live TV and Carlos Ortiz at the Garden. He was a smooth southpaw and probably one of the best 130 lbers but Kenny Lane was the smoothest southpaw of that era-in my opinion.
    Chuck

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    Re: The Greatest Junior Lightweights of All Time

    Chuck you know you got a point. I saw him get beat more than I saw him win. But even in losing to Saddler he was doing some job and might have been ahead. He totally outboxed him in their first fight. I just never saw Saddler handled like that.

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