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Thread: De La Hoya-Mayweather Pre-Fight Press & Predictions

  1. #31
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    Re: Mayweather/DeLa Hoya is on.

    I could have sworn I heard 147 discussed a while back but 154 is most likely...which will be another disadvantage for PBF.

  2. #32
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    Re: Mayweather/DeLa Hoya is on.

    This fight has all the relevance of Marciano-Louis to me. ODH isn't as far gone as Louis was but Mayweather is just so quick that he will take advantage of even a half second delay in reflexes. They are going to make a big deal out of Mayweather's victory, just as they did with Lewis over Tyson.

    This is going to be that fight that somehow "solidifies Mayweather's place with the all time greats" when to those in the know it's historical relevance is greatly inflated. Beating up on Mayorga of all people does not make Oscar a legend again. And he's expected to make 147?? Now Mayweather has youth, activity, Oscar's recent injuries, and even a comfortable catch weight for him as advantages. This is a JOKE. Oscar, don't take the fight, you don't need the money.

    I say have Mayweather fight Margarito, Cotto, and others at the division he's currently in. It seems like everyone but Floyd fans want to see Floyd-Margarito, $8 million was the offered purse for Floyd, and he has no interest in it. Margarito is an enormous welterweight, and is a very determined guy with a tough chin and ridiculously heavy hands. Even if Floyd outclasses him, it's a serious threat considering the size difference, Floyd's lack of power, and Margarito's durability and gameness.

    Maybe I'm alone in this but I'd rather see Mayweather-Margarito anyday.

  3. #33
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    Re: Mayweather/DeLa Hoya is on.

    The fight was announced at jr middle so that settles that.

    I like that fight too Achilles but Margarito would be swinging at the air, DLH will be much more competitive and interesting IMO. Margarito fights aren't always so exciting anyway when the other guy can box (see vs. Santos).

    Oscar is fighting at a comfortable weight & clearing 25mil from this...and he is still only 33..far from a creaky fart. PBF is headed up another class but clearing 10-12mil. These 2 guys will sleep fine at night when it's all over, trust me.

  4. #34
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    Re: Mayweather/DeLa Hoya is on.

    After watching Margarito's debacle with Daniel Santos I think he's WAY over rated. He's a big, tough, Mexican but he's clearly not on the same level as Oscar, or Floyd.

    & besides it's all about the dead presidents. Unless your a hard core fan you have no idea who Margarito is. Walk down the street & ask a 100 people if they've heard of these guys & probably 90 know who Oscar is & maybe 20 or so know Floyd - & you'd be lucky to find 2 people who know who Margarito is.

    It's abpout MONEY. Oscar & Floyd will not only sell out the arena they may come close to a million PPV buys. That certainly wouldn't happen if Floyd fought Margarito.

    Boxing is a business first. & Margarito just doesn't have the commercial appeal.

    GorDoom

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    Re: Mayweather/DeLa Hoya is on.

    Quote Originally Posted by diggity
    The fight was announced at jr middle so that settles that.

    I like that fight too Achilles but Margarito would be swinging at the air, DLH will be much more competitive and interesting IMO. Margarito fights aren't always so exciting anyway when the other guy can box (see vs. Santos).

    Oscar is fighting at a comfortable weight & clearing 25mil from this...and he is still only 33..far from a creaky fart. PBF is headed up another class but clearing 10-12mil. These 2 guys will sleep fine at night when it's all over, trust me.
    They will cry all the way to the bank.

  6. #36
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    Re: Mayweather/DeLa Hoya is on.

    Actually I thought Margarito / Santos was a really exciting fight, Santos stood and banged with Margarito, I had Mrgarito up by a point.

    Santos is a southpaw with quick hands and good power, I'm not surprised he made Margarito look bad. He weighed around 170 for that fight, he could give Mayweather a fight too.

    This is good fight, it's no Leonard Duran, but it's one of the better matches we could have in boxing right now.

  7. #37
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    Re: Mayweather/DeLa Hoya is on.

    Mayweather Sr. on the fight from ESPN

    http://sports.espn.go.com/sports/box...ory?id=2661905

  8. #38
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    Re: Mayweather/DeLa Hoya is on.

    As a fan I love this fight and will root for Oscar for the first time in years. Is it the toughest fight for Floyd? Nah...Mosley is probably tougher now that he's moving his hands again BUT this is a HUGE fight when Boxing is desperate for one. There hasn't been a legit superfight since Oscar-Hopkins and this one will be competitive.

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    Re: Mayweather/DeLa Hoya is on.

    I think Oscar will win this fight.

    I saw Oscar's fight against Mayorga in person and he impressed the hell out of me. I've seen thousands of fights and watched thousands upon thousands of rounds of boxing and in the last decade Oscar is one of the best I have ever seen. His left hand is a wrecking ball and he is very quick. Aside from that Oscar is smart and he's a good puncher with the right hand and he has a great jab. Fundamentally, he is better than Floyd Mayweather, Jr.

    I've also seen Floyd Mayweather fight in person against Diego Corrales, perhaps one of his best nights as a professional fighter. Floyd moves beautifully and has quick hands. However, this fight will be waged at 154 and Oscar is going to have the advantage there without question. Floyd has slowed considerably since his days at 130 and 135. Watching him at 140 and 147 I see a much more flat footed guy who can be hit and who doesn't hit that hard back. I truly feel that Floyd has some serious stylistic flaws that a good fighter, a solid figher, a sound fighter like Oscar can expose.

    We'll see, but I like Oscar in this one. I'm with Frank and Gordoom.

    If nothing else, looking forwad to this fight will make the long hard winter a little easier to take knowing this will be in the spring time.

    I'm making plans to be there for it.
    Last edited by TKO Tom; 11-14-2006 at 11:34 PM.

  10. #40
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    Re: Mayweather/DeLa Hoya is on.

    It being at 154 changes a LOT. I thought Oscar had to drain down to 147. I'm still not sure if Oscar can adjust to such quickness of hand and upper body but his chances are way higher at 154.

    Make no mistake though, ODLH is not in his prime anymore.

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    Re: Mayweather/DeLa Hoya is on.

    Quote Originally Posted by GorDoom
    After watching Margarito's debacle with Daniel Santos I think he's WAY over rated. He's a big, tough, Mexican but he's clearly not on the same level as Oscar, or Floyd.
    I appreciate you saying that GorDoom. Margarito is currently the product of Bob Arum's promotional skills not his fighting skills. Does anyone remember when Oscar De La Hoya was the next all-time great or when Bob Arum was comparing Mayweather to legendary fighters such as Sugar Ray Leonard? Bob Arum is a great promoter. Margarito doesn't own a SINGLE victory over an elite opponent and it's not because he is being ducked by everyone. He doesn’t even look impressive against most of the third and second rate opponents he’s defeated unless you include his victory over Manuel Gomez, a fighter that had been knocked out numerous times prior to fighting Margarito. Margarito is tough but he is also slow, crude and remarkably untalented. I’m amazed how many people have jumped on the Margarito bandwagon.

    Oscar poses far more of a threat to Mayweather than Margarito ever could despite being past his prime. Oscar is a vastly superior technician that has superior speed, athleticism, and punching power based on how easily he was able to handle the normally iron chinned Mayorga, a fighter that was shockingly able to take flush combinations to the head from the devastating Felix Trinidad without going down. If anyone doesn’t recall Mayorga didn’t go down until Trinidad began landing body punches. Plus Oscar, unlike Magarito, has competed on the elite level for most of his career. His victories or competitive scrapes with Genaro Hernandez, Ike Quartey, Shane Mosley and Felix Trinidad have more than prepared Oscar for the challenge.
    Last edited by lu047w; 11-15-2006 at 02:48 AM.

  12. #42
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    Re: Mayweather/DeLa Hoya is on.

    Quote Originally Posted by lu047w
    I appreciate you saying that GorDoom. Margarito is currently the product of Bob Arum's promotional skills not his fighting skills. Does anyone remember when Oscar De La Hoya was the next all-time great or when Bob Arum was comparing Mayweather to legendary fighters such as Sugar Ray Leonard? Bob Arum is a great promoter. Margarito doesn't own a SINGLE victory over an elite opponent and it's not because he is being ducked by everyone. He doesn’t even look impressive against most of the third and second rate opponents he’s defeated unless you include his victory over Manuel Gomez, a fighter that had been knocked out numerous times prior to fighting Margarito. Margarito is tough but he is also slow, crude and remarkably untalented. I’m amazed how many people have jumped on the Margarito bandwagon.

    Oscar poses far more of a threat to Mayweather than Margarito ever could despite being past his prime. Oscar is a vastly superior technician that has superior speed, athleticism, and punching power based on how easily he was able to handle the normally iron chinned Mayorga, a fighter that was shockingly able to take flush combinations to the head from the devastating Felix Trinidad without going down. If anyone doesn’t recall Mayorga didn’t go down until Trinidad began landing body punches. Plus Oscar, unlike Magarito, has competed on the elite level for most of his career. His victories or competitive scrapes with Genaro Hernandez, Ike Quartey, Shane Mosley and Felix Trinidad have more than prepared Oscar for the challenge.
    I agree with everything. And yes, I always was amazed how many people bought the Margarito "everyone is ducking him" tagline when the only big win he has is embarassing Cintron, who was a big question mark and taking a huge step up in class. Right now, he's seems like a solid welterweight contender/gatekeeper but he is no Sonny Liston of the 147 lb division.

  13. #43
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    Re: Mayweather/DeLa Hoya is on.

    Mayweather Sr. and Mayweather Jr. - Predict A Big Knockout In Bout With Oscar De La Hoya
    By Mark Vester from Boxing Scene

    Like father, like son. Floyd Mayweather, Jr. told the Las Vegas Review Journal that will not play the running game when he meets Oscar De La Hoya on May 5, 2007. He plans to stand and trade with De La Hoya, going for a knockout in what he still claims to be his final career bout prior to retirement.

    Prior to his recent bout with Carlos Baldomir, he also said that a toe to toe battle should be expected, but there was very little combat, and a lot of Mayweather using his superior skills to box Baldomir's ears off.

    "The fans aren't going to have anything to worry about," Mayweather told LVRJ. "I am going to stand toe to toe with Oscar. He has my word on that. I will be right there in front of him, toe to toe. It will be a toe-to-toe battle and, absolutely, I will (knock him out).

    "He wanted to wear Reyes gloves and I said fine. He wanted it to be at 154 (pounds) and I said fine. I truly believe in my skills and I just wanted this fight to happen. That's all I wanted. When they handed me the paper, I signed it before I read a word."

    His father, Floyd Mayweather Sr., also predicted a knockout, but the prediction was for the man he trains - Oscar De La Hoya.

    The strained relationship between the Mayweather Sr. and his son has long been documented, and this fight appears to give the father some satisfaction against what he calls "a greedy son." He does not think his son wants to fight De La Hoya to prove he is the best, he feels that his son wants to hurt him by beating the star fighter he trains.

    "This is a case of greed overcoming common sense," Mayweather Sr. said. "He's going to pay for getting greedy. He sees those dollars, but it's not about him wanting to fight Oscar, it's about him wanting to hurt his daddy. But he's going to have a surprise, because little Floyd is going to wind up on his ass. Little Floyd is fighting out of his weight class. Oscar definitely would knock him out."

    "Once in a while, the good little man beats a bigger man, but that's usually when the little man has way, way, way more talent. But that's not the case here."

  14. #44
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    Re: Mayweather/DeLa Hoya is on.

    Floyd vs. Floyd: Mayweather Family Values
    By Michael Woods from Sweet Science

    Floyd Mayweather gets it. He understands that the expectations we have for him are supersized. He understands that with a 37-0 record, and crazyfast hands, and a mouth that isn’t shy about proclaiming his perceived place in the pantheon of the sport, that there are those that aren’t shy about taking shots at him.

    “I’ve been on top so long,” he told TSS on Tuesday. “And even I want the coyote to catch the roadrunner.”

    The expectations are still there, and won’t change until his ‘0’ goes, probably, or aging exacts the inevitable toll on his superhero-level reflexes. In fact, expectations will be at maximum level leading up to the fight of the new millennium, PBF’s May 5 showdown with Oscar De La Hoya. The fight itself, pitting the P4P champ against boxing’s American Idol, will whet appetites of fight fans to the tune of a million PPV buys. Add in the family drama subplot, the fact that Floyd’s pop will be working Oscar’s corner, against his own son, well, that’ll up the PPV ante another 500,000 ticks.

    In the last few years, there has been no love lost between the father and son. There hasn’t been much love found, actually, between the Mayweathers Senior and Junior. And if you’re the sort who hopes for happy endings, and can’t even bear to gawk at this traffic accident of a relationship, then the coming months may get even more uncomfortable for you.

    Because neither Mayweather is shy with sharing their feelings, especially when it comes to airing out grievances if they feel they’ve been dissed.

    Those grievances, and that familiar fractiousness, will likely be on prominent display as we count down to May 5, when Floyd “Don’t Call Me Junior” Mayweather, trained by Roger Mayweather, meets Oscar De La Hoya, trained by Floyd Mayweather Sr., Roger’s brother and Floyd’s dad.

    A quick refresher course: The rough patch kicked into motion in 2000, during a difficult period for Junior. He was involved in a contentious negotiation session with HBO, and accused the cable giant of offering him “slave wages” to ply his trade for them. He latched on to a new manager, rap impresario James Prince, and split, in acrimonious fashion, with his trainer, his father.

    There were incidents, and allegations slung back and forth.

    It wasn’t pretty, not unless you are the sort who takes pleasure in ugly family dramas featuring warring fathers and sons.

    They have been in touch infrequently, and most communication between the two is done in the press.

    They are two exceedingly proud people, with the stubbornness that comes in handy when fending off thoughts of surrender when engaging in that thousandth session of road work, but not so useful when it comes time for interpersonal relationships.

    Come May 5, dad will be in another man’s corner, talking in his ear, sharing secrets and theories about how to best attack his son. It is a fascinating scene to contemplate, and will fuel a superabundance of hype leading up to the bout.

    Junior checked in with TSS late Tuesday afternoon, and he says it ain’t no big thing having his dad work Oscar’s corner.

    It’s all in a day’s work, says PBF.

    “My father should win trainer of the year if Oscar can win,” PBF said. “I know when we win, my uncle Roger will get trainer of the year. Because he trained me from jail to get that win against Baldomir.”

    Now, Dad wasn’t overly impressed with the Baldy performance, telling TSS that his son should have looked even better than he did.

    “He should’ve looked like Sugar Ray Robinson against Baldomir,” the father said to TSS on Tuesday early afternoon.

    Everyone, and that includes family, has ultra-high expectations for Floyd. That comes with the territory when you haven’t lost as a pro. Not only are you competing with your foe, but also with yourself. Did you not note that many of those same pundits who said Baldy would be a tough nut to crack, reversed course and complained after Floyd schooled the tough nut, and said PBF should’ve put him away?

    Mayweather, who showed a heretofore unseen level of emotion after that bout, would be excused if that emotion bubbled to the surface out of frustration. His skill set may be otherworldly, but inside, PBF is a regularly constructed being. He certainly had his reasons for finally reaching a breaking point: the criticism of him, for not taking this or that fight, for not showing a killer instinct, his trainer being locked up for battery. But PBF insists that his show of feelings wasn’t an outpouring of pent-up feelings.

    “My tears were of joy,” he said. “I’m never frustrated. I’m not frustrated. They said I should have knocked him out, that is what it is. For me, it’s about being positive.”

    His dad, meanwhile, isn’t as likely to tread that Norman Vincent Peale path.

    Baldomir, he said, was “slow as Heinz ketchup. Oscar would KO Baldomir in two or three rounds.”

    Looking ahead to that May date, Senior said that his man, his student, will best his son utilizing his superior timing. Floyd won’t be able to win backing up, Senior told TSS, because Oscar will be throwing at him like Brit tossing divorce papers at K-Fed. And if Floyd tries to work off the ropes, and roll his shoulder the Mayweather way, that dog won’t hunt, the father said. He wouldn’t share the tactic to defeat a trick that he teaches his students, but he assured TSS that Oscar would find the combo to unlock the combos that will affect PBF.

    PBF said that he won’t be looking to be too tricky when he and the Golden Boy get it on.

    “My last fight will be toe to toe,” he promised. “Oscar won’t have to chase me, I’ll be coming forward. This is the biggest fight in boxing history.”

    And we must point out, in an effort to be fair and balanced regarding Floyd, who many “experts” said wouldn’t do the De La Hoya deal because his ego wouldn’t allow him to take less than ODLH, that Floyd did read the writing on the wall, and is accepting less than Oscar.

    How much less, he won’t divulge…

    “What he gets is his business,” PBF told TSS. “He could get $100 million, that’s his business. I’m appreciative of what I get, from what I came from. I’m appreciative, not picky.”

    Most of us, maybe all of us, can’t rap our brains around it. It does not compute. How can a man train another man to defeat his son? Well, for starters, we aren’t pugilists. Our brains and bodies aren’t wired to punch, and absorb punches, in exchange for pay. That sets us apart, in a big way, from those who do. And we aren’t the Mayweathers. Many of us grew up safely ensconced in our tidy homes, without the dramas that came with incarceration and estrangement and such. Really, we have not, and we cannot walk a mile in their shoes, so we can’t accurately assess the roads they take.

    The path looks to us to be winding, and rocky, and scary.

    To the Mayweathers, perhaps, that path is just a path.

    Not winding, or rocky, or scary. The path is what it is.

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    Re: Mayweather/DeLa Hoya is on.

    Floyd Mayweather: Should we criticize?
    By Jeremy Valdez from Dog House Boxing

    It seems that Floyd Mayweather Jr will never do anything right in the eyes of his critics. Despite making it look easy in a dominating boxing performance against Carlos Baldomir to win the WBC welterweight championship at the Mandalay Bay Events Center in Las Vegas on November 4, Mayweather was criticized throughout the fight by the HBO commentators and after the fight by many other writers and reporters for not knocking out Baldomir and making it a more 'exciting fight'.

    Sure the fight didn't have the toe-to-toe action that many fans were hoping for, but why should he be forced to stand and trade against a bigger man when he can literally box circles around Baldomir and win an easy decision without taking any hard shots? Not to mention he did so with a injured right hand throughout much of the fight. Without wanting to risk serious injury to that hand he beat Baldomir with lead left hooks, superior footwork, and his defensive wizardry in the second half of the fight. You can't really fault Mayweather for not wanting to risk injuring his hand to the point that would

    require surgery that could keep him inactive for an extended amount of time.

    There was probably a good chance that had he been able to use his right hand like he wanted to, Mayweather would have stopped Baldomir. Baldomir had no answer for anything Mayweather did and was completely frustrated after only the first few rounds. In the eyes of most observers, in fact, Carlos Baldomir did not win a single round. Criticizing Mayweather's performance is like saying Greg Maddux pitching a perfect game is unimpressive because he didn't have 20 strikeouts. Let's not forget this is the same Carlos Baldomir who beat Zab Judah and destroyed Arturo Gatti. The same guy that everybody was saying would be the toughest opponent of Mayweather's illustrious career. In fact, Emmanuel Steward said before the fight that he would favor Baldomir even though he felt Floyd would be well prepared. Yes, the same Emanuel Steward that said he didn't think Baldomir was good enough to beat Gatti. He quickly changed his tune in the fight to say that Mayweather wasn't a truly great fighter because he wasn't punishing Baldomir like other great fighters would.

    I'm not going to agree with Mayweather and say he's the greatest fighter of all time. It's impossible to compare eras because today's athletes have so many more physical advantages over fighters in the past. I've only seen highlights of Sugar Ray Robinson and Willie Pep and have seen only a few fights of Joe Louis. I have, however, seen plenty of Muhammad Ali, Roberto Duran, Sugar Ray Leonard, Marvin Hagler, Tommy Hearns, Alexis Arguello and Aaron Pryor among others. I feel Pryor was actually the best of the bunch, and many people said Leonard ducked him in the amateurs and professionally, yet we don't hear about that too often. Floyd Mayweather does belong in that group. He's as talented as any of them and his work ethic would make him tough to beat. How many times did Ali call himself the greatest? What did Joe Louis' fans think about that? Yes, Mayweather is cocky but that's what drives him. The fact that he believes that makes him work that much harder not to get beat. If he had any less of an opinion of himself he probably wouldn't be 37-0. The difference and criticism with Floyd is that he wears his emotion and feelings on his sleeve. He says what he feels. It has cost him millions over his career and he understands and must accept that. He can be criticised and applauded for that. Many other great fighters feel the same way. They just want to be politically correct to try to preserve their image because if not the media has the power to convince the fans what kind of person someone is.

    So although I won't call him the best ever, I will say he doesn't deserve all of the criticism, especially from the HBO broadcast team. It's no wonder that boxing is at perhaps its lowest point in history. I've always felt that HBO's telecasts are far superior to Showtime or anyone else and I think Jim Lampley is the best play by play man in the business, but HBO shouldn't let these guys criticize the fights and fighters as much as they do. Yes, we all want honest opinions but the bottom line is that they work for HBO and demeaning these fights is not helping boxing in general or their future telecasts. We all know it's hard to keep Larry Merchant interested in anything. Sometimes I've wondered if he dozes off during some of the rounds during many telecasts. In my opinion, he's a good commentator but definitely has an agenda and is too negative a lot of the time. These guys should be selling the sport, not detracting from it. Merchant deserved everything he had coming to him from Floyd after the fight. We know Roy Jones and many others have wanted to do it for a long time. He talked about all of the boos from the crowd and the fact that many people left before the final round, but he might have failed to notice that a lot of the boos were for Baldomir for not attacking Mayweather the way he said he would and force Mayweather to get in the trenches and trade. Or he may not have seen that all of the celebrities in the star studded arena left after the 11th round so that they wouldn't get mobbed by the crowd after the fight. Not because they were bored. The section where I was sitting in was filled with Mayweather's family and friends who also left at that point, no doubt so they could get out of there quick and get to the press conference. Almost everybody else was still there for the decision. So maybe Merchant should have all of his facts straight before he makes comments like that. And no doubt Steward is a legendary trainer, but a great expert commentator he is not. He's decent, but betting against his prediction on the fight usually can be a pretty safe bet.

    Floyd Mayweather may never draw the crowd of an Oscar De La Hoya, Mike Tyson or Sugar Ray Leonard among others for many reasons, but to criticize a flawless performance is unnecessary. Drawing big pay-per-view numbers and large crowds has a lot more to do with being politically correct and how you deal with the media than performance alone. Floyd Mayweather will probably never be able to repair the image he portrayed early on in his career to gain the respect of the mass media whether it was deserved or not. As I said before, he has to live with that. And he will, very comfortably, as he has still become one of the wealthiest fighters in the sport, on his own terms.

    As for those tears at the press conference. There's no way anyone can call those fake. Whether he retires after one more fight or not, there is no doubt that's how he felt at the time. Boxing is the only thing Floyd's ever known. So to announce that he intends to retire was definitely one of the hardest things he will ever do, especially after twenty years of 'blood, sweat, and tears'. I have my doubts that it will happen like everyone else, but if he does walk away he will be missed. I will miss the perfection and precision that he brought to the sport. I actually liked the cockiness and trash talk. This is entertainment, after all. Why do you think a guy like Tito Ortiz is so popular in the UFC? He could be criticized far worse than Mayweather for his comments and actions in and out of the Octagon. The UFC is growing, however, because controversy and trash talk creates cash. Oh yeah, and their commentators don't bring down their events even no matter how bad they are. If Floyd walks away at age 30 he will join the likes of Barry Sanders, Jim Brown, and other greats who left in their prime. I applaud Floyd Mayweather if he walks away for the right reasons, but he shouldn't let the critics drive him away if that's the real reason he's talking retirement. They may get their wish and jump for joy if he does, but those same critics will be waiting for the next Floyd Mayweather type talent to come along and elevate the sport on their terms. My advice is don't hold your breath guys, you'll be waiting a while.

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    Re: Mayweather/DeLa Hoya is on.

    Respect an issue for Mayweathers
    from USA Today

    In seemingly happier times: Floyd Mayweather Jr. and Floyd Mayweather Sr. stand together when Junior reigned as WBC super featherweight champion in 2001. Now, Senior, who calls his son "disobedient," is the trainer for Oscar De La Hoya, Junior's next opponent.
    By Chuck Johnson, USA TODAY
    The high-powered matchup of Oscar De La Hoya, boxing's biggest box-office attraction, against Floyd Mayweather Jr., the world's best pound-for-pound champion, is the story line of what promises to be a fight for the ages.
    But the plot quickly thickens when an estranged father-son relationship is played out from opposing corners for all the world to see. "Pretty Boy vs. The Golden Boy?" Try "Family Feud."

    "There has never been a situation like this," says De La Hoya's trainer, Floyd Mayweather Sr., acknowledging the unusual, almost inconceivable, position he'll be in May 5 when his famous fighter tries to knock his celebrated son from the unbeaten ranks.

    "My son is the one who called out Oscar and wanted this fight," Floyd Sr. says. "By no means do I want to fight my son. But you know what? It's going to be done because I'm the trainer for Oscar De La Hoya. It's my job, and this is what I've got to do."

    Although he wanted no part of the bout when it was initially proposed, Mayweather Sr. changed his mind. He says his son has disrespected him to the point that he no longer cringes at the notion of helping him get beat.

    "I'm not going to be jumping for joy even if it is a victory (for De La Hoya), because that's still my son," Mayweather Sr. says. "But a disobedient son who has disrespected his father year after year will finally get his ass whipped. Maybe not directly by his father. But the Lord is going to show him. At the end of the day, my son will be saying, 'I wish I had my daddy in my corner.' "

    According to Floyd Jr., Team Mayweather is doing just fine as it is. "My dad can't get inside the ring and fight for Oscar, that's the main thing," he says. "And when you go to the Mayweather family, they're all riding with me."

    Mayweather Jr. is coming off a unanimous-decision victory Nov. 4 against Carlos Baldomir that kept him unbeaten (37-0, 24 KOs) and captured the welterweight title — his fifth title in four weight classes. He won resoundingly even though he was without his trainer and uncle, Roger Mayweather, Floyd Sr.'s brother, who began a six-month sentence for domestic battery in September.

    "As long as I have my team, I will never lose," Mayweather Jr. says. "Roger wasn't in my corner the last fight but I still won flawlessly. Maybe it wasn't as exciting as some of my fans wanted it to be, and I apologize for that. But I did what I had to do to win. I know what it takes. I like it when a lot of pressure is on me because it pushes me to the limit."

    Floyd Jr. anticipates having Roger Mayweather back in his corner for the De La Hoya fight, which will be held at either the MGM Grand in Las Vegas or Staples Center in Los Angeles.

    Alluding to his father, who was his trainer until their bitter split eight years ago, Mayweather Jr. ranks his uncle a notch higher. "It will be the second-best trainer in the world facing the best trainer in the world, and the two best fighters in the sport facing each other," he says. "My whole life is riding on this fight. I could never leave boxing without fighting Oscar De La Hoya to fulfill my legacy."

    De La Hoya (38-4, 30 KOs) also sees the fight in historic terms. He returned to the ring in May after a 20-month layoff and stopped Ricardo Mayorga to claim the WBC junior middleweight title, his 10th championship in six different weight classes. At age 33 and 10 years removed from when he was deemed the sport's top pound-for-pound champ, De La Hoya would elevate his already-lofty status with a victory against Mayweather, 29.

    Moreover, there's the business side. Wearing the dual hat of promoter, De La Hoya sees the potential of his company, Golden Boy Promotions, drawing on his mass appeal and Mayweather's status to make this the richest-pay-per-view fight in history. "This is the fight I wanted," he said. "Did (the business part) make me want the fight? Absolutely, that had something to do with it. But the main thing is I want to be on top again."

    De La Hoya began training with a strength and conditioning coach this week and plans to meet with Mayweather Sr. this weekend to make sure there won't be any obstacles in his preparation.

    "After some of the comments I've been reading over the internet, with Floyd Jr. not giving his father respect, I don't think Senior is going to have any problem training me for this fight," De La Hoya said. "I'll be meeting with him to get a sense of how he feels."

    The elder Mayweather, 53, doesn't sound like he'll be compromised despite his blood ties to his son and his professional ties to De La Hoya.

    "Oscar's had that pound-for-pound title a couple of times, but my son has got caught up in that (bleep)," Mayweather Sr. says. "I know my son because he's just like me. I've got a big ego myself. I've still got my ways, but the difference is I'm older now and I'd never disrespect my father or mother. When this fight is over, they won't be saying pound-for-pound. It's going to be clown-for-clown."

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    Re: Mayweather/DeLa Hoya is on.

    Never underestimate Oscar.

    With that said, when Mayweather dominates Oscar, then all you Floyd haters can come on here, and tell us how DLH isn't any good, and he's was way past his prime, and Floyd needs to fight a legit (enter weight class here).

    Hatton beat a horrible Kosta, and all of a sudden he was god and the next best thing to sliced bread, now he's a party favor trying to find a fight.

    It doesn't matter who Floyd beats, or how he does it, it's never good enough.... But, I expect this to be a killer fight.
    Last edited by Kurant; 11-17-2006 at 02:28 PM.

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    Re: Mayweather/DeLa Hoya is on.

    I don't hate PBF, in fact I think he is one of the best, if not the best since SRL.

    With that said, I just think that DLH will be to big for PBF.
    Every thing been equal (Size & weight) I would pick PBF to win


    Frank B.
    Last edited by kikibalt; 11-17-2006 at 04:16 PM.

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    I'm not waiting.

    [/B]"when Mayweather dominates Oscar, then all you Floyd haters can come on here, and tell us how DLH isn't any good, and he's was way past his prime"-Kurant.

    I'm saying it now.

    "I'm stating in advace that I expect Floyd to win, becuase the version of Oscar that he is facing is NOT the one who was at his best. So NO, I do not beleive that if Floyd beats this Oscar, that it carries the weight of what it would have had he beaten a PRIME Oscar."

    &

    "Everything I look at in this bout and envision in my head what Oscar COULD do to Floyd, I do so with a version of de la Hoya who is much closer to his prime. Not the current edition of Oscar. Which I do Not believe is nearly as good as he looked agianst Mayorga."

    Hawk 10/14/06

    Actually I said it 3 days ago. In two seperatate Posts.

    Hawk
    Last edited by hawk5ins; 11-17-2006 at 04:56 PM.

  20. #50
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    Re: Mayweather/DeLa Hoya is on.

    A Look at De La Hoya vs. Mayweather, Jr.
    By Johnny Ortiz from Boxing Scene

    The fight between Floyd Mayweather, Jr. and Carlos Baldomir went just the way any knowledgeable fight expert would have expected, Carlos, try as he might, was just to slow and just did not have enough ring savy to be able to cut the ring off on his elusive opponent.

    It has always been my contention that Pretty Boy is an exceptionally superb fighter, but I have a little trouble dubbing him the best pound for pound fighter around. Ducking Antonio Margarito for an eight million dollar purse tells me that he wisely picks his spots and wanted no part of Antonio. I would pick Margarito in a heartbeat to beat him.

    Against Antonio, he would not get away with the stuff he did against a brave, but totally outclassed Carlos Baldomir. Now that he has signed to fight Oscar De La Hoya on Cinco de Mayo, I would like to take this time to go on record and declare that Oscar will beat Floyd Mayweather, that is if he can catch him. I believe that Oscar over twelve rounds will eventually knock him out.

    At 154 pounds, not only will Oscar be too big and too strong for Pretty Boy, but with his vast expierence, he will know how to cut the ring off on Floyd. Oscar first stepped into a ring at the ripe old age of five, Floyd will not be able to show the six-time world champion anything he has not seen before.

    The bottom line is that Pretty Boy cannot hurt the Golden Boy, but rest assure, Oscar can definitely hurt Floyd. If you think that Floyd ran from Baldomir, he will leave skid marks getting away from Oscar. I liken this fight to the time that I not only picked Bernard Hopkins to beat a 4-1 favorite Felix Trinidad, but I picked him to knock Tito out.

    I feel exactly the same way about this fight. Floyd Mayweather saying that he is the best of all time is laughable, one can only imagine his chances in a welterweight fight with Sugar Ray Robinson, Jose "Mantequilla" Napoles, Sugar Ray Leonard, Tommy Hearns and Roberto Duran just to name a few. Please!!!! No one will ever convince me that Floyd beat Jose Luis Castillo in their first fight, I have eyes.

    No question about it, Floyd is a terrific, extremely gifted fighter, but the best...no way! He was smart to take the Oscar De La Hoya fight, with the most popular fighter in the business, he is guaranteed to make a substantial amount of money, without him, forget landing a pay for view fight after his non aggressive fight against Carlos Baldomir.

    Floyd is a Pernell Whitaker type, they’re great and like Pernell once did, Floyd keeps on winning, but for the most part, like Pernell, their fights do not excite fight fans, not exactly a prerequisite for pay-per-view.

    As a young boy, Oscar beat Pernell, now older, he will beat Floyd. This is just the tip of the iceberg, you can bet I will have a lot more to say and write when the Golden Boy-Pretty Boy fight gets closer.

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    Re: Mayweather/DeLa Hoya is on.

    This is a great fight all around for the sport of boxing. It will at least provide a spark to get the average fight fan talking about boxing again which is a good thing.
    I like both of these guys as fighters but I'm going with de la hoya in this fight. He's bigger, stronger, can take anything pbf dishes out and has more experience (especially in big fights) than any current fighter. I also keep thinking of the trouble Jose Louis Castillo gave pbf several years ago. I think DLH can pressure him, wear him down and catch him with some solid shots.

  22. #52
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    Re: Mayweather/DeLa Hoya is on.

    Size Matters: De La Hoya vs. Mayweather, Jr.
    By Brent Matteo Alderson from Boxing Scene


    So it’s finally going to happen. Oscar De La Hoya and Floyd Mayweather Jr. are going to duke it on May 5 in Las Vegas, Nevada in a bout for Oscar’s 154-pound WBC title.

    Mayweather has already been installed as a 2-1 betting favorite to beat De La Hoya who is aging and has been inactive, but I think members of the boxing fraternity are underestimating Oscar.

    First off, even though Oscar has been relatively inactive, he looked great in his last fight against Ricardo Mayorga. Even though Mayorga isn’t the reincarnation of Sugar Ray Robinson he was a world class fighter with a big punch and had brawled on even terms with the likes of Cory Spinks and Vernon Forrest, two guys that are top contenders in the 154-pound division. Throw in the fact that Oscar frequently used his right hand in the bout, a punch that he neglected during the first half of his career and it still appears as though Oscar is a very dangerous fighter who is near the top of his game.

    Don’t get me wrong, I still think Pretty Boy Floyd is the best fighter in the world and feel as though he is so fundamentally solid and has so much speed that he should be favored to win the fight. But, I just feel like people are counting the Golden Boy out with out pondering the match-up.

    The fundamental question going into the fight isn’t if Oscar is still in prime or if Mayweather is a better fighter than Oscar. The real question surrounding this fight is, “Can De La Hoya’s advantage in size compensate for Mayweather’s advantages in speed and boxing ability?” That’s the underlining question.

    Think about it, in twenty-seven of Floyd’s thirty seven bouts, he weighed in under the lightweight limit of 135-pounds. And even though he has been successful at the higher weights he hasn’t established a significant championship legacy like he did when he was the most dominant Junior Lightweight Champion in history. Floyd has only fought six bouts above the lightweight limit, three at 140-pound and three at 147-pounds and now he is moving up yet again to fight Oscar De La Hoya at 154-pounds. That’s an incredible jump and even though it’s been done, more fighters have failed in their championship quests at higher weights than have been successful.

    Most of the fighters that have won major titles at higher weights have done so against mediocre titlists. Sugar Ray Leonard didn’t beat Michael Spinks or an even a Virgil Hill for his WBC 168 and 175-pound titles, he instead beat Donny Lalonde, who was so eager to make his first and only multi-million dollar payday that he agreed to come in at 168 pounds so the fight could also be fought for the newly created 168-pound title as well as his 175-pound title. This was also advantageous to the Sugar Man because Donny Lalonde had to cut so much weight that he was severely weakened and even though he put Sugar Ray down for just the second time in his career, he was too weakened to put up a sustained effort and was brutally knocked out in the 9th round.

    Again we’re not talking about Donny Lalonde; we’re talking about Oscar De La Hoya. We are talking about an Olympic Gold Medalist who has beaten more world champions than any active fighter today. We are talking about a man who fought Bernard Hopkins for the middleweight title two years ago. Even Emanuel Steward, who trained Oscar for a stint in 1997 thinks highly of Oscar’s fighting ability.

    When asked if he thought if Oscar would have been able to compete with the great welterweights of the 80’s, Emanuel commented, “I don’t know if Oscar would have beaten those guys because Tommy and Ray Leonard were really special, but I do believe that with his combination of speed and boxing fundamentals that he would have been able to compete with any of them.”

    Some fans might bring up the fact that Oscar also fought at a lower weight similar to Floyd, but he only fought beneath 140-pounds for the first three years of his career. Since 1996 he has fought at or above 140-pounds and has been fighting at Junior Middleweight since June of 2001.

    This size disparity between the two will dramatically impact the evolution of the fight. Because Mayweather is moving up and since he was already just an average puncher at the lower weights, his punching power will be diminished considerably and his punches will have less of an impact on De La Hoya than they did on previous smaller opponents.

    Even though Oscar was stopped for the first time in his career against Hopkins, I don’t think that performance was a realistic indicator of the quality of Oscar’s chin because to this day I still feel like De La Hoya took a dive because for the first time in his career he was in a fight that he knew he couldn’t possibly win. Thrown in the fact that Hopkins is probably one the top six or seven middleweights of all-time and that he was a huge 160-pounder who moved up and won the real Light-Heavyweight Championship and is now contemplating fighting world class heavyweights, which makes De La Hoya’s ability to last nine rounds with the Executioner a hard fact that Oscar has a hall of fame caliber chin. And If Hopkins couldn’t legitimately put De La Hoya down through nine rounds then Floyd Mayweather definitely won’t be able to accomplish the task.

    The second way in which the size difference will affect the fight is that even though Oscar’s power has also diminished as he moved up in weight, he is still a dynamic puncher and has the definitive edge in power. Although more size doesn’t always mean more power in this instant it rings true. De La Hoya has always been a better puncher than Floyd and the disparity in size is going to exasperate the difference in power.

    If Floyd had been offered 10-million dollars for the Ricky Hatton fight at 140, he would have still made the Junior-Welterweight limit. Conversely in his last fight, De La Hoya looked at though that he finally filled out into a genuine 154-pounder. He was solid and didn’t look like he could drop down to welterweight.

    The speed of the fighters is the third way in which their weight disparity will affect the fight. Smaller fighter are usually faster than larger fighters and this axiom will be exemplified during the course of the fight. Mayweather is smaller and faster while De La Hoya is larger and more powerful. Suprisingly, I envision a bout similar to the 1987 classic between Ray Leonard and Marvin Hagler. With Floyd on his toes landing light flashy punches with De La Hoya following him around the ring trying to land his power shots to no avail. Still even in his bout with Hagler there were times when Ray had to gut it out and fight with the man and that is when we are going to see If Floyd has it. We never got to see Roy Jones pushed in his prime, but I think we are going to get the chance to see Floyd pushed.

    Another very plausible scenario is that De La Hoya comes out and his strength, enormous size, and vast physical advantages overwhelm Mayweather much the same way that Terry Norris overwhelmed Meldrick Taylor in their 1992 match up and he knocks out Floyd in a fashion similar to how he beat Auturo Gatti.

    You could bring up the fact that Shane Mosley moved up from Lightweight to Welterweight and then to Junior Middleweight to beat Oscar and theorize that if Mosley could do it then Floyd will be able to, but the problem with that rationalization is that Mosley was a huge lightweight. In fact he fought as an amateur at 139 pounds in a class seven pounds above Oscar’s Olympic weight so there wasn’t that much of a size disparity when the two fought in comparison to Floyd who fought in the 1996 Olympics at 119 pounds.

    Joe Louis coined the phrase, “He can run, but he can’t hide,” and this very well rings true when the Golden Boy meets the Pretty Boy on May 5 at the MGM Grand in a bout where size does matter.

  23. #53
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    Re: De La Hoya-Mayweather Pre-Fight Press & Predictions

    Oscar De La Hoya and Floyd Mayweather Jr; Bad Guys who are Good
    By Johnny Benz from Dog House Boxing

    No one can deny when it comes down to crunch time, two of the baddest fighters in the ring are undoubtedly Oscar De La Hoya and Floyd Mayweather Jr. Both have the kind of skills that not only pay the bills, but also showcases the kind of talent reserved only for future hall of famers. Inside the ring, you don't expect Gentlemen, you expect Monsters with relentless savage power. You get that with De La Hoya and Mayweather Jr. So when May 5th rolls around, the date reserved for De La Hoya vs Mayweather Jr, fans won't be expecting anything but two explosive fighters bringing all they got to the table. You shouldn't expect anything less from these two bad asses.

    They sure are bad inside the ring, so it's a pleasant surprise that both of them represent themselves like Gentlemen in public. Recently Floyd Mayweather Jr was in Grand Rapids, Michigan hosting his fifth annual Thanksgiving Feast giveaway. At the event, Mayweather handed out over 500 turkeys to selected families. The turkeys came with all of the trimmings - including potatoes, vegetables, stuffing, cranberry sauce and pies. One elderly man who had no gas to get

    home from the event was handed $20 by Mayweather Jr. himself just to ensure the man got home safetly. It's stuff like that that makes you respect Mayweather Jr. He doesn't have to do it, and it certainly doesn't make him any money. You can judge a man's heart when you see him help out so many strangers. The verdict is Mayweather's heart is made of warm solid Gold and not a cold lump of Coal.

    De La Hoya's Golden Boy Promotions this weekend will be hosting Approximately 5,000 children and their families to an event that will see the families enjoying the day with real snow, entertainment, fun, food and lots of toys. The toys will be given out by Golden Boy Promotions fighters. The event will not be cheap and like Mayweather's Thanksgiving day Feast, it won't be a money making event, but it will touch countless lives in a positive way. It's something De La Hoya does not have to do, but he chooses to do so. He chooses to give back and not over look those less fortunate than the rest of us.

    It makes you feel good when you know that some of the cold hard cash you pluck down on these pricey Pay-Per-View events makes it's way back to the community. It makes you want to support fighters like De La Hoya and Mayweather Jr. At least it does for me. I respect what they are doing on the outside. Yeah, they might be "Bad" inside the ring, but outside the ring they are as "Good" as they come... and isn't that the way it is suppose to be? De La Hoya and Mayweather Jr are making the sport look good on their free time and on their dime.

    Of course most of us do not have the kind of money to do what De La Hoya and Mayweather can do, but we can learn a lot from them and take a page from their kindness. We might not be able to give 500 turkeys away or load up 5000 children with toys... but each of us can do our small part. A little donation to the Salvation Army or your local food depot for the needy will go a long way. Maybe some extra kindness is all the world really needs, to remember there are those who need our help... and even a little help means a lot on a grand scale.

    Have a Safe Holiday Season and remember others this Christmas.

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    Re: De La Hoya-Mayweather Pre-Fight Press & Predictions

    I know one thing, Floyd Jr. is not gonna stand there and punch it out with Oscar, an aged Oscar at that. Hes gonna out box him. I dont like this fight at all. id rather see Floyd go down to 135 or 130 and face Manny Packman. Then we'd see something!!!!

  25. #55
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    Re: De La Hoya-Mayweather Pre-Fight Press & Predictions

    A Message to Floyd Sr. and Floyd Jr.; Stop and Think Before it's Too Late
    By Jeff Mayweather from Braggingrightscorner.com

    Once again I feel it's my duty to step up and be the man I feel my brother and nephew should be. I have been reading all these horrible and distasteful articles and I'm reaching out -again- to these two people that I care for and love immensely. Since the Floyd Mayweather Jr. versus Oscar de la Hoya fight was made, it has brought out the absolute worst in both Floyds.

    To be honest, there are no real losers financially in this fight, so why not just let it be business and not a mud-slinging contest like you're running against one another, like in some race for political office.

    I'm not passing judgment on my nephew, simply words of wisdom...

    Floyd Jr., as a father yourself, you need to set a better example for your children than your very own actions against your Dad. How would you feel if your children did to you the same exact thing you are doing to your father, (karma). Would you be hurt or confused as to why this has happened? In such a case, you shouldn't be upset, because they will have learned that behavior from you, their father. What will be your response if your own son said to you, "Dad you did the same thing with your Dad, so it can't be wrong."

    The sad part is that one day these children will read all this bad publicity, and they will be old enough to understand, and because of your actions you will turn them against the man that gave you life and is also their grandfather. They will never

    know the true meaning of his existence in your life; because you're upset with him your children will miss out on sharing precious moments with their grandfather.

    I must tell you that neither one of you looks good in this situation. There is a song that immediately comes to mind, "Cat's In the Cradle." Anyone that knows this song knows exactly what it tells, its message. Take a look back in time, as well as into the future, and ask yourselves, where will this nonsense lead?

    Floyd Jr., can you remember the time when you and your Dad were inseparable and started out on a mission together where money was never an issue, only the goal you shared, which was to take the boxing world by storm and make a lasting impression, one so strong and unique that both of your names would be remembered forever in the annals of boxing history? (Not for one of the worst father and son's relationship to ever grace -or should I say disgrace- the sport of boxing).

    Floyd Jr., you once said that once your father was released from prison he would never again have to eat beans, it would be steak from then on. Those words that once rang so loud and strong, no longer have any meaning at all.

    Floyd Sr., please don't wear your emotions on your sleeve for the entire world to see. Don't let the media bait you into some negative response about your son and how you feel disrespected by his ways, and don't take it to heart as though you're talking about the enemy and not your own son, the child you passed your boxing knowledge on to, which has put him in the position where he is today. You don't have to remind everyone of that fact, because the Boxing world knows. Everyone already knows Floyd Jr.'s story, and no matter how he tries to display it, he just can't disassociate himself from you.

    Floyd Jr. and Floyd Sr., there was a time when you needed each other so badly that your need for one another is the reason you both are here today. Otherwise all this talk and hype, success, the praise, and all that goes with being successful, could very well have never happened. When a shotgun was drawn on your Dad at point-blank range, pointed at his chest, the only thing that saved your Dad was the fact that he took a chance not only with his life but yours as well. When told to put his son the ground, Floyd Sr. had the courage to say he was willing to sacrifice all that you meant to him and was ready to give his life willingly. While staring death in the face, while he looked into the perpetrator's eyes, he said, "You will have to kill us both!!!" He then received a shotgun blast to his leg instead and almost lost the limb in the process.

    I'm sure you can still remember the many days you went to the hospital and saw your father lying in a hospital bed with his legs screwed together in order for the muscles from one leg to create muscles for the weaker and wounded leg. The countless skin grasps that were necessary before he could walk again. Have you forgotten?

    Can you both remember how it felt that day when all the dreams and hard work paid off, when Floyd Jr. won his very first Championship over Genaro Hernandez? I certainly do, and it brought tears to my eyes. It was as though everything you guys had dreamed of had finally arrived, and the skies were the limit. Are those moments in time going to be the only precious moments you two will have for the rest of your days on this earth?

    In reality, one day, one of you will pass on. You, as a son, will you even attend your father's funeral? And you, as a father, will you attend you son's funeral? And if you do, please don't shed a tear because once a person is gone, they are gone forever; there are no more second chances to right whatever was wrong right here on earth.

    The time is now, because tomorrow isn't promised to anyone. Neither one of you can tell me you have so much resentment that it doesn't matter. They say money is the root of all evil, please don't let it destroy you and the legacy you created together; not one person did it, we all had a part in creating what is now considered the Mayweather Legacy. Myself and Roger, and the entire Mayweather family included, we all had a hand in helping Floyd Jr. become the fighter he is today, no matter how small that part may have been.

    Our family could be one of the most powerful families in the history of boxing if we could just let our guards down and joined forces to uplift our name. We need to stop using the famous shoulder roll when it comes to dealing with the issues that confront and hurt us.

    I hope that one day we can all get together and sit down over dinner; we don't even have to talk about boxing, just talk about better days. I'm sure it would warm everyone's heart, even if it's just for that one day. Let's have one day together as a family. I feel we owe that much to my Mother before she passes on, she is the matriarch of the family and I'm sure before she leaves us she would have a smile on her face that no amount of money could ever bring.

    Life is too short. Don't be afraid to say something nice every once in a while. I was once told that if you don't have anything nice to say, it's best to say nothing at all.

    My plea to you both is to stop and think before it's too late...

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    Re: De La Hoya-Mayweather Pre-Fight Press & Predictions

    Im picking De La Hoya on this one

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    Re: De La Hoya-Mayweather Pre-Fight Press & Predictions

    Love him or hate him, Oscar takes on the best in the world again and again. HOF here he comes.

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    Re: Mayweather/DeLa Hoya is on.

    Quote Originally Posted by kikibalt
    I don't hate PBF, in fact I think he is one of the best, if not the best since SRL.

    With that said, I just think that DLH will be to big for PBF.
    Every thing been equal (Size & weight) I would pick PBF to win

    I agree with Mr Baltazar that Oscar should prove to be too big for Floyd. The key to this fight is can/will Oscar be able to cut off the ring & make Floyd stand and fight. If he can't then Floyd will potshot him all night. If he can keep Floyd on the ropes I think he wears him down and either wins a clear decision or possibly stops him late.

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    Re: De La Hoya-Mayweather Pre-Fight Press & Predictions

    When was the last time Oscar won a megafight?
    Actually I think PBF outslicks Oscar pretty easily.Floyd usually rises to the occasion in these kinds of fights while Oscar usually dosen't.

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    Floyd Mayweather Sr. Speaks Out

    Floyd Mayweather Sr. Speaks Out
    By David A. Avila from Sweet Science

    A gust of wind whistles through the crowded gym as Floyd Mayweather orchestrates pinpoint punches from his pupil like a music maestro directing a full symphony.

    Pacing and rhythm are deadly serious even during drills.

    Other pugilistic trainers peek a look over at the professor of boxing who wears a white cut-off tee shirt emblazoned with “World’s Greatest Trainer” on the front. Mayweather shouts out instructions to his protégé who is sparring inside one of two boxing rings.

    Inside the Las Vegas boxing gym Mayweather appears content. But once the gym quiets down the turmoil regarding his potential tutoring of Oscar De La Hoya boils to the surface. His son Floyd Mayweather Jr. will be opposing the Golden Boy on May 5, 2007.It could be the greatest boxing event of this century.

    Critics decry the father for intending to guide a fighter against his own son. In one recent piece a boxing writer debased Mayweather for his decision to train De La Hoya for the right price.

    Mayweather was incensed by the comments tossed at him.

    “That writer is an a*****e,” Mayweather said. “He’s a coward for not saying it to my face.”

    It irks the professional boxing trainer that anyone should be able to toss rocks through his glasshouse.

    “People don’t understand I was training Oscar before little Floyd wanted to fight him. So why should I have to stop,” said Mayweather. “I didn’t tell little Floyd to fight him.”

    Teaching prizefighters the finer points of the science of boxing has enabled the former professional boxer to accumulate a number of the best prizefighters in the country. Fighters line up to learn the finer points of boxing from the boxing maestro, like some modern-day Socrates.

    Professional fighters such as Panchito Bojado, Mickey and Cortez Bey, Chad Dawson and Laila Ali enlist his aid to prepare for battle inside the ring.

    “I got a few more,” Mayweather says.

    On this day, after Chad Dawson completes his training for the day, Ali steps through the ring ropes to begin her work with the boxing maestro. Speed and more speed with precision, timing and defense are Mayweather’s trademarks.

    “Floyd works on everything defense and offense,” said Ali who is preparing for her next bout, that takes place in Africa on Feb. 3.

    Though Mayweather has guided De La Hoya’s last eight prizefights during the last seven years, the former Michigan native feels a variety of reasons predicate a larger contract for this looming clash. At the moment, Golden Boy Promotions and Mayweather are negotiating.

    “First, both Oscar and little Floyd are getting much more than they normally get, so why can’t I get mine? I got to be compensated,” Mayweather says adding that De La Hoya is making more than $26 million and his son $12 million. “Second, he’s (De La Hoya) fighting my son. I’m the one who taught him (Floyd Jr.) all he knows.”

    Floyd Mayweather Jr. has rocketed through the boxing world capturing world titles in four weight classes beginning in 1998 when he stopped Genaro “Chicanito” Hernandez for the WBC junior lightweight title. Since then he moved up in weight three more times in winning the lightweight division, junior welterweight division and welterweight division world titles. Now he’s zeroing in for a fifth against De La Hoya.

    “If Oscar wants to beat little Floyd he has to come to me. I’m not saying he can’t beat Floyd without me because he does have a puncher’s chance,” Mayweather said, adding that De La Hoya has the heart of a champion. “But I got all the answers because little Floyd learned all he knows from me.”

    When De La Hoya first announced he would consider fighting Mayweather Jr. he insisted he would do it with Mayweather Sr.

    “I won’t fight without Floyd Mayweather Sr. in my corner,” De La Hoya said after beating Ricardo Mayorga last May.

    At first Floyd Sr. balked at the prospect of guiding a fighter against his son. But now, for an unspecified price, he would prepare the Golden Boy against his son Floyd Jr.

    Back in the late 1990s Mayweather Sr. was imprisoned for several years on drug charges. He resumed training his son but soon the two broke from each other due to differences of opinion over managerial matters. Papa Mayweather was kicked off the residence his son had allowed him to use and the two have barely spoken with each other since. Floyd Sr. was replaced as his son’s trainer with Roger Mayweather the uncle.

    Mayweather Sr. said this past November the Mayweather family gathered for a holiday at grandma’s house. He arrived early and expected to see the whole family. When Floyd Jr. arrived and learned his father was present, he departed quickly.

    “He jumped back in his car and left,” said Mayweather shaking his head. “That decided for me to kick his [butt] and get someone to kick his butt for me.”

    Floyd Jr. refuses to comment on the family matters. He acknowledges the boxing wisdom he attained from his father and his uncle.

    “My father is more defensive-minded,” said Floyd Jr. “My uncle Roger’s style is more exciting.”

    Family strife aside, Golden Boy Promotions has yet to decide whether to bow to Mayweather’s demand for a monetary boost for his services. Calls to the Golden Boy headquarters on Friday afternoon have not been returned.

    Mayweather doesn’t worry about whether he will be retained or not.

    “When he challenged Oscar he challenged his daddy,” he says of his son. “Training fighters is my job. It’s my business. I don’t want to go back in prison again.”

    As Chad Dawson, one of his fighters, prepares to leave the gym, Mayweather gives the lanky southpaw some advice. The light heavyweight challenger listens intently as if it were his father.

    “I’m a teacher,” Mayweather said. “Ain’t no one man going to hold me down.”

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