Home News Current Champs WAIL! Encyclopedia
The Cyber Boxing Zone Message Board
+ Reply to Thread
Page 41 of 69 FirstFirst ... 313233343536373839404142434445464748495051 ... LastLast
Results 1,201 to 1,230 of 2060

Thread: History of California Boxing in Photos

  1. #1201
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    In the Barrio, In La Puente,Ca.
    Posts
    12,026
    vCash
    500

    Re: History of California Boxing in Photos

    Quote Originally Posted by Wing master
    Does any of you have any idea where this picture might have been taken at? It was taken around the time Hank fought at the Olympic Auditorium in late 1935. The photo is in the Winkler collection, if that helps.



    Thanks guys.
    Randy
    Have no idea where this pic was shot at, it might be at the original Main Street Gym., but I couldn't say for sure...that gym burned down around 1951.

  2. #1202
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    711
    vCash
    500

    Re: History of California Boxing in Photos

    Seems to me there were three major boxing gyms in LA at the time. The Main Street Gym, the Manhattan Gym in the Spring Arcade Building and the Ringsside Gym on 12th street between Broadwaay and Hill. The photo looks to be from the Rinside Gym, which was never crowded or even busy in those days and did not last very long in business.

    hap

  3. #1203
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    In the Barrio, In La Puente,Ca.
    Posts
    12,026
    vCash
    500

    Re: History of California Boxing in Photos

    Quote Originally Posted by dongee
    Seems to me there were three major boxing gyms in LA at the time. The Main Street Gym, the Manhattan Gym in the Spring Arcade Building and the Ringsside Gym on 12th street between Broadwaay and Hill. The photo looks to be from the Rinside Gym, which was never crowded or even busy in those days and did not last very long in business.

    hap
    Thanks friend Hap....

  4. #1204
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    711
    vCash
    500

    Re: History of California Boxing in Photos

    A bit or two on John Thomas, a fine boxixng master, reliable referee and all around nice guy. He had an older brother who boxed earlier, Clarence. John's two bouts with Bolanos were mini-classics in that he seemed to be leading early on but failed when he elected to trade with his heavy hitting foe. I was at ringside for both fights.
    The one outdoors at Wrigley field was on occasion of my first date with my future wife, Jo (46 years). It is believed to have been for the state lightweight title, but in fact was advertised for the Pacific Coast Championship

    Strangely, the very hot rematch was held indoors at the Olympic, a reversal of what usually happens with hot rematches. They went from a huge venue into the confines of the Olympic Auditorium. That turned out to be John's last fight. He retired at a very early age. The two kayo losses to Bolanos ae the only two such recorded against John Thomas, a bundle of class. personified.

    hap
    .

  5. #1205
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    711
    vCash
    500

    Re: History of California Boxing in Photos

    You are quite welcome Frankie. Just hope I am right about the photo.

    hn

  6. #1206
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    In the Barrio, In La Puente,Ca.
    Posts
    12,026
    vCash
    500

    Re: History of California Boxing in Photos



    Rudy Garcia
    Former California Featherweight Champion
    In this day and age Rudy would have been be a super star... :OhYes:

  7. #1207
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    711
    vCash
    500

    Re: History of California Boxing in Photos

    Rudy Garcia was one of the hardest punching featherweights developed in California. He was managed by Lee Boren, who also stareted Artie Aragon. The buckle he is wearing here was awarded to him a Hollywood Legion Stadium where he won the state title. The gold plated piece was fashioned by Tom Ogilvie, who later became Post #43 Commander and had a musical instrument repair shop in the Legion building to the right of the main entrance on El Centro sreet.

    hap

  8. #1208
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Wyoming U.S.A.
    Posts
    340
    vCash
    500

    Re: History of California Boxing in Photos

    Thanks Hap and Frank.
    I will look into the Ringside Gym.
    You two guys knowledge is priceless.

    Thanks again
    Randy

  9. #1209
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    In the Barrio, In La Puente,Ca.
    Posts
    12,026
    vCash
    500

    Re: History of California Boxing in Photos



    John Thomas
    John refereed my last amateur fight, I never fought pro.





    John Thomas with??

  10. #1210
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    In the Barrio, In La Puente,Ca.
    Posts
    12,026
    vCash
    500

    Re: History of California Boxing in Photos



    Charlie Powell


  11. #1211
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    In the Barrio, In La Puente,Ca.
    Posts
    12,026
    vCash
    500

    Re: History of California Boxing in Photos



    Left to right: Tommy Hart (referee), Bill Schroeder, Willie Pep, unknown woman, Mushy Callahan & Braven Dyer Jr..

  12. #1212
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    711
    vCash
    500

    Re: History of California Boxing in Photos

    About the Ringside Gym:

    I liked the place, it was neat, clean, well equipped but lacked the dawing power somehow to bring in the mainstream battlers to train there. Hymie Caplan, who had both Lou Salica and Abe Feldman at the time, trained his boys there.
    On one of my visits to the gym I struck up a conversation with a young, affable featherweight named Sal Hernandez. He was at Jefferson High School and boxing pro, I was at Fremont High goofing off. We seemed to hit it off well, and he told me he was one of two brothers boxing. Frankie Hern was his brother's fighting name. Sal was just a prelim kid at the time which leads to the upsshot of this little bit.
    A few weeks later I was shocked when Sal was rushed into a main event at the Olympic against the highly feared Henry Armstrong. I never learned the details, or even the reason that fight was approved by the people in charge, but it remains in my memory as one of the worst mismatches of all time in our state of California. Naturallly, Henry disposed of the youngster in a couple of rounds. Bah humbug.

    hap navarro

  13. #1213
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    in a house
    Posts
    172
    vCash
    500

    Re: History of California Boxing in Photos

    Hap - while your brain is firing on all cylinders do you have any idea who the gentlement in this photo are?

    I have Big Boy Hogue on the left then................?


  14. #1214
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    711
    vCash
    500

    Re: History of California Boxing in Photos

    Boxscribe:

    No idea at all, mainly because my eyesight has been letting me down for many months now. If I were to use the photo in a published work, I would simply crop the shot leaving the two fighters intact. I didn't even recognize Burley in the photo.....that's how bad my eyes have gotten. Sorry.

    The mere thought of the twins facing Burley in ring combat is mind boggling to me. But i have no doubt that fights like that hastened the Hogues' exit from the limelight. Read the account of Shorty's bout with Charley in the midwest to get an idea of what I mean.

    h00ap navarro

  15. #1215
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    in a house
    Posts
    172
    vCash
    500

    Re: History of California Boxing in Photos

    Hey Hap- thanks for the feedback.

    I think the fighter shaking hands with Big Boy is Larry Derrick (I have another photo from their fight, but Derrick is on the deck). I just wanted to see if anyone knew any names for sure.

    You are right about the twins and Burley. Burley knocked Shorty cold in Minneapolis (the first - and possibly only - fighter to this). The result is listed as a TKO because the ref didn't even bother to count; Shorty was out for a while.

    As you know, the twins had a habit of challenging the guys that beat the other, so Big Boy sought a fight with Burley after Charley stopped Shorty. The result was the same (a clean KO, but listed as a TKO) only a few rounds sooner in that instance.

    I think the general concensus is that Shorty was the better of the two and there was always that sibling rivalry between them to prove who was the better (hence the challenge matches).

    Would you say that was the case?

  16. #1216
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    711
    vCash
    500

    Re: History of California Boxing in Photos

    Question......are you Harry Ottey?

    I have always had a soft spot in my heart for those two boys since they retired so prematurely and so dramatically on a downward spiral. The two should have retired rich and famous instead of all but forgotten by their hundreds of fans. I thought they would hit it big when they came under the management of oldTom Jones, who had managed three world champs. But perhaps the kids had their own way in charting their boxing careers. Lordy how enormous those two would have been in today's boxing market place.

    Good to hear from you.

    hap navarro

  17. #1217
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    2,503
    vCash
    500

    Re: History of California Boxing in Photos

    hello hap,

    i was wondering if you have any recollection of the fight at legion stadium between freddie steele and jimmy casino. seemed a failed comeback attempt for the great steele.

    thanx,

    greg

  18. #1218
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    in a house
    Posts
    172
    vCash
    500

    Re: History of California Boxing in Photos

    Quote Originally Posted by dongee
    Question......are you Harry Ottey?

    I have always had a soft spot in my heart for those two boys since they retired so prematurely and so dramatically on a downward spiral. The two should have retired rich and famous instead of all but forgotten by their hundreds of fans. I thought they would hit it big when they came under the management of oldTom Jones, who had managed three world champs. But perhaps the kids had their own way in charting their boxing careers. Lordy how enormous those two would have been in today's boxing market place.

    Good to hear from you.

    hap navarro
    Yes Hap, I am Harry Otty. The story of the Hogue twins is a very sad tale indeed. They had very short and bright careers as you know. I have researched their boxing careers from their amateur days (I think I know have complete amateur records for both - most definately for Shorty) right through their pro careers and for a good deal of stuff that went on in their life outside of boxing (military careers etc.). Should make for a great story/book if I can get past a few walls.

    Anything you have on them would be a great help (anecdotes etc.).

    I know it has been repeated a few times about how Charley Burley ruined a few fighters - in the case of Shorty Hogue I believe Charley definately started him on the slpppiery slope.

  19. #1219
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    711
    vCash
    500

    Re: History of California Boxing in Photos

    Quote Originally Posted by gregbeyer
    hello hap,

    i was wondering if you have any recollection of the fight at legion stadium between freddie steele and jimmy casino. seemed a failed comeback attempt for the great steele.

    thanx,

    greg
    My all time favorite middleweight. bar none because I have accorded the same honor to Sugar Ray as a welterweight. I have no recollection of that fight except that it had been rumored that Freddie was still suffering from an earlier injury when he had his last few bouts. That may be true, but somehow, Steele had lost much of his poise after his beloved manager Dave Miller died.
    His record is obviouslyh impressive, having lost only five times in more than 120 bouts, and three of those losses coming very; late in his career.

    I sorta relived his reat moments viewing his performance in the film Story G.I. Joe where he does a solo bit that stays with one for hours later.
    To see Freddie at his very best you must watch his total domination of a rising Gus Lesnevich at the Olympic in the late 1930s.
    I would liken him to a speedier Billy Conn with deadly accurate power in either fist. Freddie Steele.

    hap

  20. #1220
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    In the Barrio, In La Puente,Ca.
    Posts
    12,026
    vCash
    500

    Re: History of California Boxing in Photos



    Rudy Garcia, standing on the right, with other members of the 1948
    Los Angeles National Golden Glove Teams on their way to Chicago for
    the national tournament.

  21. #1221
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    In the Barrio, In La Puente,Ca.
    Posts
    12,026
    vCash
    500

    Re: History of California Boxing in Photos


  22. #1222
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    2,503
    vCash
    500

    Re: History of California Boxing in Photos

    Quote Originally Posted by dongee
    My all time favorite middleweight. bar none because I have accorded the same honor to Sugar Ray as a welterweight. I have no recollection of that fight except that it had been rumored that Freddie was still suffering from an earlier injury when he had his last few bouts. That may be true, but somehow, Steele had lost much of his poise after his beloved manager Dave Miller died.
    His record is obviouslyh impressive, having lost only five times in more than 120 bouts, and three of those losses coming very; late in his career.

    I sorta relived his reat moments viewing his performance in the film Story G.I. Joe where he does a solo bit that stays with one for hours later.
    To see Freddie at his very best you must watch his total domination of a rising Gus Lesnevich at the Olympic in the late 1930s.
    I would liken him to a speedier Billy Conn with deadly accurate power in either fist. Freddie Steele.

    hap
    thank you hap,

    yes he had a great record and does not get enough credit in all time listings. there is a bowling alley here in bellingham (where freddie had his first few pro bouts as a 100 pounder two against jimmy britt whom had a great record himself) that once had a statue of him. i keep meaning to try and run down what happened to it. he also owned a pub not far from here after he retired from boxing as well as hollywood.

    i have seen the lesnevich fight and he is frightening in his execution of such a good fighter as gus.

    i believe the injury was a broken sternum which made lifting his arms in defense difficult and lead to his shocking one round KO loss to all hostack.

    would have loved to have seen more of freddie steele.

    greg

  23. #1223
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    In the Barrio, In La Puente,Ca.
    Posts
    12,026
    vCash
    500

    Re: History of California Boxing in Photos

    Not Boxing

    Whittier Blvd, E.L.A

    Memories of A Lost Boulevard; Ghosts of the Eastside




    By Aidesmadre

    The character of the E.L.A. that I knew growing up is long gone. Everything changes, evolves.
    Those who lived there before me surely must have cherished their own “good old days” as much as I do mine. And twenty years from now, others will do the same.
    We are beings that exist in that sliver of time between our past and future. Yet, if we were to somehow erase every memory from the past out of our minds, who would we be? The sum of our experiences, the memories of what we have lived before, are essentially the totality of who we are at this moment. So have my experiences and present memories of growing up in E.L.A. formed this person that I am today. E.L.A. is in my DNA.
    It now brings me joy to reminisce, because I can relive those times. Many thanks to all of you out there who join me on these little journeys to memoryland. So let’s take another trip….

  24. #1224
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    711
    vCash
    500

    Re: History of California Boxing in Photos

    Greg:

    There were actually two Jimmy Britts, the Californiana and he Northwesterner, who came along later. Our local guy eventually convinced the other felldow to stop ;using the name.

    Steele was always a cut above most great middles because of his great fluidity, his balance and the ease with which he executed boxxing's more difficult moves.
    His very first pro loss was really a joke. He was talked into a four round bout at the Olympic in 1932 when the club was tryng to return their programs to the old four round days. Freddie was outscrambled by Tommy Herman, a fellow he whipped in a return six rounder shortly afterwards. The curse of the short bout also cost Yg. Peter Jackson when he was outpointed by Don Fraser, Steele's stablemate on one of those cards. In a longer rematch, Jackson stopped Fraser easily.
    I never understood the reasoning, but as late as the 1950s there were advocates in California boxing who longed for the old four round days.
    Bah humbug.

    hap navarro

  25. #1225
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    2,503
    vCash
    500

    Re: History of California Boxing in Photos

    Quote Originally Posted by dongee
    Greg:

    There were actually two Jimmy Britts, the Californiana and he Northwesterner, who came along later. Our local guy eventually convinced the other felldow to stop ;using the name.

    Steele was always a cut above most great middles because of his great fluidity, his balance and the ease with which he executed boxxing's more difficult moves.
    His very first pro loss was really a joke. He was talked into a four round bout at the Olympic in 1932 when the club was tryng to return their programs to the old four round days. Freddie was outscrambled by Tommy Herman, a fellow he whipped in a return six rounder shortly afterwards. The curse of the short bout also cost Yg. Peter Jackson when he was outpointed by Don Fraser, Steele's stablemate on one of those cards. In a longer rematch, Jackson stopped Fraser easily.
    I never understood the reasoning, but as late as the 1950s there were advocates in California boxing who longed for the old four round days.
    Bah humbug.

    hap navarro
    well, now i am confused. according to boxrec the jimmy britt that faced freddie stelle in his first 2 pro fights was from bellingham washington and seemingly went 76 fights never being KO'D.

    on looking for the other jimmy britt i found about a dozen or so.

    funny that people longed for four rounders. these days i find myself long for 15. of course putting a couple of top performers in a 4 rounder might really produce some fireworks.

    greg

  26. #1226
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    711
    vCash
    500

    Re: History of California Boxing in Photos

    Greg:

    The Britt that complained about the Bellingham Britt using the name was the San Fancisco Britt who had fought McGovern, Gans, Nelson, etc. etc.

    hap

  27. #1227
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    2,503
    vCash
    500

    Re: History of California Boxing in Photos

    ahh,

    thank you hap.

    boxrec has the san francisco jimmy britt has having had only 23 fights which goes to show how incomplete boxrec still is. it would be hard to imagine with the names on his resume that he did not have a lot more fights than that.

    still, i get a kick out of perusing records. some interesting facts emerge. i was surprised for instance that mando ramos and willie pep had a common opponent in one ray coleman. if nothing else ray has that. maxie rosenblooms record also amazes me. the ammount of rounds and the traveling he did is impressive.

    lot of fun and it jogs the strangest things from my memory. while going over jerry quarry's record the other day i was struck by the card at the olympic where a fought scrap iron johnson the second time. the semi that night was between pajaro corona and lobito montoya. what i remembered about that fight was a voice at the back of the arena that yelled 3-4 times a round "stop thee fight .... lobito is killeeeng heem". i still laugh thinking about that guy and wonder who he was. i always consider that my "give it to heem colima" moment in time.

    ah well, memories. what else do we have my friend ?

    greg

  28. #1228
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    711
    vCash
    500

    Re: History of California Boxing in Photos

    Greg:

    Maxie was the first fighter to receive more than scale as payment for a prelim bout when he arrived in California after the new boxing law of 1925 took effect. He got $400 for his first showing. In the mid 1930s Gus Wilson's young wildcat Wally Hally received $500 for a prelim bout at the Hollywood Legion,

    And you are right about our Jimmy Britt, who is still almost unknown in spite of his stature among the early idols in this state.
    I also have several unrecorded bouts for Bobby Pacho, early in his career that I have not learned yet how to get into his BoxRec spot.......can you help?

    hap navarro

  29. #1229
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    711
    vCash
    500

    Re: History of California Boxing in Photos

    Oh yes, Greg:

    On the subject of that booming voice from upstairs at the Olympic.....we had one fellow, a heavy set fan who loved to yell out "Referee, stop that bloody battle". always during a slow fight at the Olympic.

    In my day we had Merle, a Legion regular customer who always yelled out "Too Late" as the round came to an end. But the never fail experience at the Olympic always occurred during a dull bout when someone would inflate a condom and float it around the balcony customers for an hour. Fight fans.

    hap navarro

  30. #1230
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    In the Barrio, In La Puente,Ca.
    Posts
    12,026
    vCash
    500

    Re: History of California Boxing in Photos

    Quote Originally Posted by dongee
    Oh yes, Greg:

    On the subject of that booming voice from upstairs at the Olympic.....we had one fellow, a heavy set fan who loved to yell out "Referee, stop that bloody battle". always during a slow fight at the Olympic.

    In my day we had Merle, a Legion regular customer who always yelled out "Too Late" as the round came to an end. But the never fail experience at the Olympic always occurred during a dull bout when someone would inflate a condom and float it around the balcony customers for an hour. Fight fans.

    hap navarro
    Hap, I remember the inflate condom, the lady's underwear, and the rolls of toilet paper flying around in the Olympic's balcony back in the early '50's.

+ Reply to Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
News Current Champs WAIL! Encyclopedia Links Home