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Thread: History of California Boxing in Photos

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    Re: History of California Boxing in Photos

    Art "Golden Boy" Aragon, November. 1949

    Art Aragon, billed as The Golden Boy, is taking the title quite seriously. He wears a gold colored robe and drives a gold colored Cadillac..

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    Re: History of California Boxing in Photos



    Al Silvani, Frank Sinatra, Cisco Andrade, Hank Sanicola, Ralph Gambina

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    Re: History of California Boxing in Photos

    Art "Golden Boy" Aragon On Oscar De La Hoya,

    "He can use the nickname, good fighter," " Reminds me a little of me. Glad we came in different eras, wouldn't have been room for both of us."

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    Re: History of California Boxing in Photos

    Art "Golden Boy" Aragon 1954,

    Much of the sheen of the "Golden Boy," Art Aragon, has worn off in recent years because of bad showings he's made and because of the defeats he's suffered, but the cocky welterweight still must be considered a top man in his class. Art, for example, has been decisively whipped when he's tackled the champions or top contenders. Jimmy Carter gave Aragon his worst trouncing in 1951 when Art tried to win the lightweight crown. Earlier Carter had lost to Aragon in a non-title match. Billy Graham decisioned Art early to halt a six-match victory string. And while Aragon bested Chuck Davey in Los Angeles, the verdict was questionable and unpopular. But Art's over-all record is good.

    Unpopularity is nonthing new to Aragon, who works out of Los Angeles. His sneering remarks about other fighters, his cafe brawls, his showy behavior has long had press and public alike against him. Nevertheless, arrogant Art is a torrid box-office attraction on the West Coast. From 1950 through 1953, for example, his 23 bouts drew over $620,000 in gate revenue. The fans flock to the Stadium to see the brash, 26-year-old welterweight get his just deserts. He's always booed upon entering the ring wearing a gold robe. Once Aragon retaliated by thumbing his nose at the crowd.

    The controversial, "colorful" Aragon hails from the sunbaked state of New Mexico. He turned professional at Los Angeles in 1944, after having worked as a laborer in a dairy plant. A speedy boxer with concealed dynamite in both hands, he ran up a phenomenal string of kayoes although his opposition at first was limited solely to West Coast local talent. His initail big win was over Enrique Bolanos and he's had good wins over Johnny Gonsalves and Lauro Salas. Art is managed by patient Jimmy Roach who has made Aragon rich beyond his dreams. Most boxing insiders feel Aragon hasn't a chance to cop welterweight honors unless he trains seriously and cuts out his screwball tactics. Meanwhile, though, they're paying off.

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    Re: History of California Boxing in Photos

    Keeny Teran/Pappy Gault, April. 9, 1955

    Keeny Teran, 113, one of the most controversial figures in California ring history, was declared the winner by TKO, in round two, over Pappy Gault, 118, former American bantam champ, at Hollywood Legion Stadium. There was a storm of protest from many ringsiders who felt that referee Tommy Hart had been over-hasty in the stoppage of hostilities. Gault had not been floored. He was staggered by a right to the chin, but seemed to be possession of all his faculties when the referee stopped it.

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    Re: History of California Boxing in Photos

    Enrique Bolanos/Manny Madrid, May. 25, 1951

    A low blow landed by Manny Madrid, 138, was all that saved Enrique Bolanos, 136, from suffering his first defeat in the Hollywood Stadium ring. Madrid was penalized one point for the foul, which made their total points add up even at the end of the bout-and the contest was declared a draw. Madrid had led in 5 of the first 7 rounds, but faded in the stretch, possibly due, in part, to a psychological effect, as Bolanos moved out in front immediately after being given a rest to recuperate from the low blow. When the bout resumed in the 7th. Bolanos fought with renewed vigor, while Madrid slowed up and became wild in his punching, Enrique won the final three rounds, mostly with an effective left hook to the body. Although Bolanos is the puncher of the two, it was Madrid who came closest to scoring a knockdown, having Enrique in trouble late in the 6th.

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    Re: History of California Boxing in Photos

    Art "Golden Boy" Aragon/Morris Leviege April. 21, 1955

    Art Aragon the Golden Boy, who attracted over $9000,000 into the till of promoter Cal Eaton in his last 26 fights, returned to a California ring after an absence of ten months to score a 7-round knockout over Morris Leviege, Eureka, at the Olympic Auditorium. Aragon somewhat slow and rusty after his long lay-off, flashed his old-time form in the 7th, after being nailed by some hard punches. He flamed into action with a sharp left hook which set Leviege back on his heels, then followed up with a blistering barrage for which he is famed. Referee Lou Grossman, sensing the helplessness of Leviege, halted hostilities after 1 :25 of the 7th. Aragon weighed 146 1/2; Leviege 140.

    Leviege is the lad who had Cisco Andrade on the canvas last November, up in San Jose, though Cisco won the duke. In his last appearence in Los Angeles. Aragon drew a gate of $130, 000 with Vince Martinez at Hollywood Ball Park, to establish a California record for a non-title fight. Despite a driving rain, a crowd of 4,038 cash customers paid a gross $6,388 to see the rukus. As one scribe put it; "only with Aragon could this happen". This fight was not televised.

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    Re: History of California Boxing in Photos

    Art "Golden Boy" Aragon/Mario Trigo, May. 8, 1951

    In defeating Mario Trigo at Los Angeles Olympic, Art Aragon won the California lightweight title and the dubious distinction of being the foremost contender (California version) for world title. And some of the local scribes stated that he looked the part. It was an action scrap and although not one-sided, Trigo was the recipient of much punisment. Mario was not as elusive as usual, in fact, was an easy target, but, due to poor timing, Aragon missed half his punches. Aragon, set on a kayo victory, stalked Trigo continually and had his jinx opponent hurt and wobbly several times, but couldn't put over the finisher. Trigo appeared about to cave in numerous times, but he recuperates quickly, and would always come back with a counter-attack. Mario was decked once, a short hook dropping him for a 1-count in the second.
    Trigo outslugged the tired Aragon in the 8th, and came out fast in the 9th, forcing Art to give ground, but shortly after was knocked into the ropes from a left hook to the jaw. Seeing his foe was hurt, Aragon tore in with a vengeance, raining lefts and rights to Mario's head. Trigo was being badly pounded but appeared in no worst shape then on several previous occasions and the referee's action in halting the fight at this point brought forth considerable booing. Aragon looked drawn and pasty at 134 1/2, Trigo came in at 135.

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    Re: History of California Boxing in Photos

    Quote Originally Posted by Cholo
    Art "Golden Boy" Aragon/Teddy "Red Top" Davis, May. 22, 1951
    Anytime a cagey, shifty boxer is bent on merely going the distance, it is almost impossible to knock him out and in failing to tag him, his apponent is made to look bad. Such was Art Aragon's predicament in his 10-rounder with Teddy(Red Top)Davis, of Hartford, at the Los Angeles Olympic. They started fast, but Davis soon discovered that Aragon was out for a KO victory and that is what would happen if he, Davis, didn't avoid Art's artillery. And Red Top knew the answer to that one. Davis ducked like a hell-diver, ran like a deer, and grabbed like a bargin hunter at Macey's. The crowed booed the cutie's tactics, but it didn't change his safety-first technique. The pattern of the contest was the same round after round. Aragon continually stalked Davis, but missed over half his punches and all of the pay-off ones. Art did get in some short hooks and uppercuts that hurt the Hartford hare. Red Top may not have been scared, but at times he gave a good imitation of a guy who was. Aragon, 138, was credited with 9 of the rounds. Davis weighed 134.

    Art Aragon vs Teddy "Red Top" Davis

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    Re: History of California Boxing in Photos

    Over a 100,000 views, thanks people....

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    Re: History of California Boxing in Photos

    Cassius Clay knocks out Archie Moore



    By: Scott Harrison

    Nov. 15, 1962: Cassius Clay raises his arms in triumph after knocking out Archie Moore in the fourth round of their match at the Sports Arena. Clay — who in 1964 changed his name to Mohammad Ali — had predicted he would win in the fourth round.

    Los Angeles Times writer John Hall reported:

    Cool and cruel Cassius Clay turned the “Battle of the Ages” into his own private Clay bake Thursday night as he amazingly erupted just as predicted to send a finished Archie Moore reeling toward retirement with a crushing fourth round knockout triumph before 16,200 dazzled fans at the Sports Arena.

    Moore, hopelessly beaten from the start, went down three times in the fourth before referee Tommy Hart stopped it at 1:35 with the battered old Mongoose lying limply on his side. …

    For the 11th time in his 16-0 pro career, Clay called the exact round. Against such a dangerous, experienced and proud old warrior as Archie the Mongoose it belongs in the Twilight Zone.

    This photo by former Los Angeles Times staff photographer Larry Sharkey was lead art on the front page of the next morning’s Times Sports section.

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    Re: History of California Boxing in Photos

    Quote Originally Posted by Cholo
    Art "Golden Boy" Aragon/Johnny Gonsalves, July. 24, 1951
    One big round, in which he almost stopped his foe, gave Art Aragon a decisive victory over Johnny Gonsalves in their ten-rounder at the Los Angeles Olympic. Whithout that lop-sided round, Aragon would still have rated an edge on his aggressiveness, for the Oaklander boxed too much on the defensive. However, toss out the fifth heat and the result might have been different, for even after that pummeling, Johnny came back to cop a couple of the remaining rounds. Gonsalves wasn't the boxing wizard he was against Rudy Cruz, although he did some beautful defensive work, causing Aragon to miss two-thirds of his punches and at times look like a rank amateur, several times he had the enraged Golden Boy lunging into the ropes and occasionaly Art would find the elusive Oaklander behind him. But Aragon kept winging and his peristence paid off in the fifth. Aragon nailed Gonsalves with a right on the jaw that sent Johnny reeling into the ropes and Art was at him with the fury of a wounded beast. Aragon rained blows on his hurt foe, who covered up as best he could, but many of the punches landed on the Oaklander's jaw and head. How that boy can withstand punishment! After 30 seconds of this pummeling, Gonsalves turned away and his head protruded outside the ropes, which prompted Referee Mushy Callahan to push Aragon aside and start counting over the Oaklander. At the count of three, Johnny turned around and put on a counter-attack that forced Aragon to give ground. The crowd yelled like mad! The all-out attack took a lot of steam out of Aragon and no doubt sapped a lot of Gonsalves' stamina, so the fight slowed down a bit in the following rounds, although they were still exciting sessions and closely contested. Aragon weighed 139, Gonsalves 137.


    I was at the Olympic for this 1951 fight Paul, and I can still clearly hear the roar of the crowd as Aragon was pounding Gonsalves against the rope.


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    Re: History of California Boxing in Photos

    Quote Originally Posted by Cholo
    Art "Golden Boy" Aragon/Chico Vejar, Mar. 15, 1958

    It was a rainy evening, but it didn't prevent Hollywood Legion Stadium from establishing a new record for gate receipts. A crowd estimated at 6,000 paid a gross of $40,444 to see Art Aragon, 153, register a unanimous decision over Chico Vejar, 154, and margin of victory was quite conclusive. Referee Frankie Van tabbed it 99-90: Judge Dynamite Jackson, 98-92, and Judge George Latka, 97-91 Previous high for Hollywood was $29,800, set in 1955 by Bobo Olson and Willie Vaughn. Given a break in the weather, this time , the Legion might have sold out completely and drawn close to $50.000. The fight was not televised. Prices: $5 to $15. Aragon's best weapons were his potent left hook and right hand uppercut. Only in Round 2 did Vejar seem to have the upper hand. Only knockdown of the fight was registered by Aragon in the 6th, when Chico went down for no-count following a left hook to the chin. Legion capacity is 6,500 and when a crowd of 6,000 braved dreary, rainy weather at $15 top to see this scrap. It was probably the best compliment Aragon has received in many years. It is possible that Aragon's next opponent hereabouts may be fellow-townsmen Tombstone Smith or possibly Kid Gavilan. Both fights would be sellouts.
    Frank, I have a scrapbook with loads of old newspaper clippings of Golden Boy, I'll post more. I hope they soon do a documentary or book on the Golden Boy, would make fascinating viewing and reading..
    Art Aragon v Chico Vejar







    Art Aragon having his gloves taken off by trainer Benny Conyers

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    Re: History of California Boxing in Photos



    Babe McCoy Smoking Cigar and Standing Next to His Lawyer
    Matchmaker Babe McCoy, who had been called the "big boss"
    of California boxing, confers with his attorney Jake Ehrlich, (R),
    after returning from an appearance before a committee investigating
    gangster influence in California boxing.

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    Re: History of California Boxing in Photos

    Babe McCoy
    From Boxrec Boxing Encyclopaedia

    Matchmaker

    Babe McCoy (real name "Harry Rudolph"), brother of former World Middleweight Champion Al McCoy, perhaps is best known as the matchmaker for the Los Angeles Olympic Auditorium from 1942 to the mid-1950s. He is regarded as the driving force at this famed arena during that era. Before becoming a matchmaker at the Olympic in 1942, McCoy was a well-known figure in Los Angeles boxing circles for close to a decade. For much of the 1930s, he was manager of boxers. But during the early 1940s, he would switch over to promoting and matchmaking at various Los Angeles area venues -- including the Wilmington Bowl, the Eastside Arena, and the Ocean Park Arena.

    When a colorful Australian sports legend and the manager of the Los Angeles Athletic Club's Riviera Polo Fields, Snowy Baker, became the boxing promoter at the Olympic Auditorium, which was owned by the Los Angeles Athletic Club (L.A.A.C.), Baker hired a veteran matchmaker, Joe Waterman. An all-around boxing man, Waterman had a great deal of success as a matchmaker at many venues, including the Olympic during at least two previous stints. But in 1942, Waterman didn't stay long because of personal health problems. As a result, Babe McCoy became Waterman's replacement.
    Babe McCoy

    Snowy Baker was the boxing promoter at the Olympic Auditorium for about a year. After Baker left, Cal Eaton took over the post. About the same time, a red-headed woman named Aileen LeBell would become the business manager. Lebell had worked for the L.A.A.C. or for one of the bigwigs of the club, Frank Garbutt. Eaton, Lebell, and McCoy would form a formidable trio, with McCoy being regarded the key member at the time, due to his knowledge of the boxing business.

    Since World War II was raging at the time, unemployment was practically nil and people had plenty of money to spend. As a result, the timing of the trio couldn't have been better. Despite the fact that the Olympic Auditorium had gone through some tough times during the 1930s because of the Great Depression, it was regarded as a venue with great potential. In fact, a number of boxing people had some success at the Olympic previously. They included Joe Levy, Jack Doyle, Wad Wadhams, and Joe Waterman.

    In 1956 the California State Athletic Commission banned Babe McCoy for life for having arranged fixed matches along the West Coast from the late 1940s through the mid-1950s.

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    Re: History of California Boxing in Photos

    Art "Golden Boy" Aragon/Tommy Campbell, May. 16, 1950

    At the Olympic Auditorium at Los Angeles, Art "Golden Boy" Aragon scored a three-round knockout over Tommy Campbell after a questionable second round which saw Aragon decked for a seven count. Midway in the second round Campbell caught Aragon flush on the jaw with a right cross to the chin which sent Aragon careening through the ropes and onto the apron of the ring. Referee Reggie Gilmore waved Campbell to a neutral corner and began counting over Aragon, the 1 to 5 favorite. Golden Boy stood up on wobbly legs, but Campbell made no move to step into action and as Aragon moved across the ring they fell into a clinch without throwing a punch. At the end of the round the referee went to Campbell's corner and told him to get in there and fight or his license would be taken away. Campbell made an effort in the third, but Aragon came out like a tiger and a vicious left hook followed by a powerful right cross dropped Campbell for a nine count. As he arose Aragon rushed him and with a crushing right dropped him for the full count. An investigation the day following the fight saw both fighters cleared on all counts but Campbell's California license was taken away because he has failing sight in one eye. A crowd of 7,500 was on hand, contributing a gross of $16,558.

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    Re: History of California Boxing in Photos



    Art Aragon v Tommy Campbell

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    Re: History of California Boxing in Photos

    Quote Originally Posted by Cholo
    Art "Golden Boy" Aragon/Carlos Chavez, June. 6, 1950

    The veteran Carlos Chavez pulled one of the big upsets of the year when he took a ten-round decision over the top heavy favorite. Art Aragon, in their Los Angeles battle. The fight was action packed from the opening bell with Aragon making the mistake of staying in close with the bull shouldered Mexican. Chavez outbanged the "Golden Boy" in close and then when he backed away, Carlos caught him with hard shots to the head. Chavez set a blistering pace from the start with the younger Art matching him blow for blow in the early heats. However, instead of wearing himself out, Carlos kept up the torrid going after the half-way mark, while Aragon began to show signs of wear and tear. At long range, Aragon missed badly and Chavez countered beautifully. In the fifth round the Mexican shook Aragon with a left hook to the chin after Art missed a right cross aimed at the jaw. The Hollywood youngster was on queer street for over 50 seconds as Chavez chased him all over the ring in a bid for the kayo. However, Aragon came back strong during the last minute of the round to make it a fairly close session. After the battle, Aragon admitted he lost, but that he just couldn't seem to get started. Here is the scoring of the officials: Referee Joe Stone tabbed it 58 to 52 points for Chavez Judge Charley Randolph had it 56 to 54 for the Mexican and Judge Johnny Indrisano marked the bout 57 1/2 to 52 1/2 for the Mexican battler, making the decision unanimous. A crowd of 7,478 wild-eyed fight fans paid a gross gate of $32,210.60 for the show which was promoted for the benefit of the worthy "Fight for Life" charity. Despite his loss, Art Aragon remains the biggest attraction on the Pacific Coast and he was rematched with Enrique Bolanos right after the Chavez upset. In there first bout, Aragon knocked out Bolanos and gained one of the top-contender spots for Champion Ike Williams' title..


    Carlos Chavez (L) v Art Aragon I

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    Re: History of California Boxing in Photos

    Quote Originally Posted by kikibalt View Post
    Babe McCoy
    From Boxrec Boxing Encyclopaedia

    Matchmaker

    Babe McCoy (real name "Harry Rudolph"), brother of former World Middleweight Champion Al McCoy, perhaps is best known as the matchmaker for the Los Angeles Olympic Auditorium from 1942 to the mid-1950s. He is regarded as the driving force at this famed arena during that era. Before becoming a matchmaker at the Olympic in 1942, McCoy was a well-known figure in Los Angeles boxing circles for close to a decade. For much of the 1930s, he was manager of boxers. But during the early 1940s, he would switch over to promoting and matchmaking at various Los Angeles area venues -- including the Wilmington Bowl, the Eastside Arena, and the Ocean Park Arena.

    When a colorful Australian sports legend and the manager of the Los Angeles Athletic Club's Riviera Polo Fields, Snowy Baker, became the boxing promoter at the Olympic Auditorium, which was owned by the Los Angeles Athletic Club (L.A.A.C.), Baker hired a veteran matchmaker, Joe Waterman. An all-around boxing man, Waterman had a great deal of success as a matchmaker at many venues, including the Olympic during at least two previous stints. But in 1942, Waterman didn't stay long because of personal health problems. As a result, Babe McCoy became Waterman's replacement.
    Babe McCoy

    Snowy Baker was the boxing promoter at the Olympic Auditorium for about a year. After Baker left, Cal Eaton took over the post. About the same time, a red-headed woman named Aileen LeBell would become the business manager. Lebell had worked for the L.A.A.C. or for one of the bigwigs of the club, Frank Garbutt. Eaton, Lebell, and McCoy would form a formidable trio, with McCoy being regarded the key member at the time, due to his knowledge of the boxing business.

    Since World War II was raging at the time, unemployment was practically nil and people had plenty of money to spend. As a result, the timing of the trio couldn't have been better. Despite the fact that the Olympic Auditorium had gone through some tough times during the 1930s because of the Great Depression, it was regarded as a venue with great potential. In fact, a number of boxing people had some success at the Olympic previously. They included Joe Levy, Jack Doyle, Wad Wadhams, and Joe Waterman.

    In 1956 the California State Athletic Commission banned Babe McCoy for life for having arranged fixed matches along the West Coast from the late 1940s through the mid-1950s.
    I would really like to see Hap's thoughs on this post.

    Randy

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    Re: History of California Boxing in Photos

    Thanks for the invite, Randy.

    I cannot write about McCoy or the Olympic without mention of the little gem across town, the Hollywood Legion Stadium. Funny thing about the two fight clubs and their matchmakers. One was huge,almost two large for the local fan base while the other was a cozy, jewel box catering to a more affluent clientel. But the competition was fierce, almost palpable, friendly at times and warlike during some periods, especially during the late depression years in the mid 1930s.

    Keeping the great Olympic afloat was always a problem every year until World War II broke out. At a time when the Legion was jumping for joy with its consecutive yearly sellouts, week in and week out, the Olympic was frequently running spot shows. The place went dark for the first time soon after its grand opening with an announcement that "lack of talent" caused the card cancellation. The ultimate happened in 1940 when the Olympic showed weekly until late June and then went dark for the reminder of the year.
    In 1941 it remained dark from January to March, when boy wonder Joe Lynch took over as matchmaker for a short time.

    Babe McCoy is credited with saving the place for boxing but he had a tremendous boost from the outbreak of the world war. Even then, I remember getting in to the Olympic balcony with a coupon and a service charge of 25 cents. That only stoppped when Parnassus, who headed the local managers association, pressured the promoters to discontinue the practice.

    Without a doubt the Olympic Auditorium will be eternal in the minds of us old timers, regardless of how controversial its matchmakers might have been. It simply could not compete on a weekly basis with the Legion Stadium. The Hollywood club had a more affluent fan base, people in the film industry who made the place their Friday night hangout where more movie business was transacted in one night than in the previous four working days. It was their place to be on fight night, and for the aspiring thespians it was the place to be seen. The overhead nut for each show was miniscule in comparison to what it cost the huge Olympic each week. And its matchmaker at the time, Charlie McDonald had a plush job where he could match two out of towners in the main event and still play to a sellout audience. In the east it was the Garden, in the west it was usually the Legion Stadium where touring fighters wanted to show.

    Much more to this topic, but for now will take a break.

    hap

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    Re: History of California Boxing in Photos



    Audie Aragon, son of boxing Legend Art Aragon, speaks of his father at WBHOF event shortly after the death of the original "Golden Boy".

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    Re: History of California Boxing in Photos

    Thanks Hap.
    This information is priceless.
    Thanks again for passing on your expierence.

    Randy

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    Re: History of California Boxing in Photos

    Art "Golden Boy" Aragon.."The Ring" (1952)

    Screen script writers have again turned to the boxing ring for a film plot and the release this month of the King Brothers' production "The Ring" could well be the beginning of a profitable period for Los Angeles lightweight Art Aragon. In the film Aragon makes his debut as a screen star in the role of a Lightweight title holder, and when you remember that he has won and lost on points to world's champion Jimmy Carter, who Aragon is currently tempting into a rubber match for the world's crown. Art could well repeat his screen performance in real life....

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    Re: History of California Boxing in Photos



    Rick Farris (L)vs. Gabe Gutierrez
    1970 Diamond Belt Bantamweight Championship-Olympic Auditorium, Los Angeles

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    Re: History of California Boxing in Photos



    Frank Baltazar, and old rivals, Bobby Chacon and Danny "Little Red" Lopez at the 2010 California Ball of Fame Banquet.

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    Re: History of California Boxing in Photos

    The Teamsters Gym, downtown Los Angeles, Ca.



    This is where my boys started their boxing careers back in '64. I was in the area this morning and I stopped and shot this photo. Memories of past times came flooding to me as I shot the photo, I closed my eyes and I seen 3 year old Tony and 6 old year Frankie shadow boxing in the Teamsters ring.

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    Re: History of California Boxing in Photos

    Boxing is build on a foundation of sepia tone memories passed on from generation to generation and the Teamsters gym produce plenty.

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    Re: History of California Boxing in Photos



    Julio Cesar Chavez and Don King...1989

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    Re: History of California Boxing in Photos

    Frankie Baltazar v Chango Cruz

    http://youtu.be/tgDI91Q81p0
    Frankie Baltazar v Chango Cruz
    October 28, 1976

    On Monday, October 25, 1976, Frankie and I were working at a Ford dealership (paint shop) in Alhambra, Ca. That morning I told Frankie that on our lunch hour I was going to go see Don Chargin at the Olympic Auditorium to see if I could set up a six-round fight for him for that coming Thursday night.

    I left Alhambra about 11:30 AM. and got to the Olympic about 25 minutes later. As I parked the car I was thinking about how hard it had become to get Frankie fights. His record stood at 4-1 with 2 knockouts. The one decision loss was an out-of-town (Stockton, Ca.) fight against Reynaldo Zaragoza, a fight that just about everybody in the house thought Frankie had won.

    As I entered the Olympic I was hoping that I wasn't again wasting my time as I had been doing lately in talking to Chargin. I climbed the stairs to his office and as I got to the door I could hear Harry Kabakoff saying, "What are we going to do Don? Castillo won't fight Cruz."

    "We'll find somebody for him to fight, so don't worry Harry," I heard Don say. As I walked in I could see that Harry looked like he was about to start crying, but he smiled a big smile when he saw me walk in.

    "Is your boy ready to fight?" Harry asked me.

    "Yes, that's why I'm here, to see if I can get Frankie a six-round fight," I answered.

    "How about Thursday night in the main event?" Harry asked.

    "Against who?" I countered.

    "Chango Cruz."

    "C'mon Harry. Cruz has had 12 fights with 8 KO's, Frankie only has five fights. By the way, what happened to Castillo?"

    "Castillo got sick, so they say. I think they are afraid to fight my new champ," said Harry.

    I turned to Chargin and asked him about getting a six-round fight, and he said that none of the local fighters wanted to fight Frankie and that it was too expensive to bring in out-of-town fighters for a six-round fight. At that point Harry jumped in and told me to forget about a six rounder and to take the Cruz fight. Chargin then said, "Frank, we'll pay you XXX dollars."

    "I don't know, Don. Like I said, Frankie only has had five fights, and he has never gone more than seven rounds. This would be a ten-round fight against a guy with 12 wins, 8 by knockout. I don't want to put Frankie in over his head," I said to Chargin. Harry again jumped in and said they would pay us more than they first offered. After going around for about an hour and seeing the offer go up a few more times and being told not to worry about the weight, I accepted the fight.

    I got back to the shop and told Frankie to go home, that he was fighting the main on Thursday. "Who am I fighting Pops?" he asked.

    "You are fighting Chango Cruz, mijo," I said.

    "But Pops! Cruz has 12 wins and 8 by knockout. I only have five fights. What happened to Castillo?"

    "Castillo got sick, mijo. Now go home, I'll see you at the gym," I told him.

    I wasn't sure that Frankie would beat Cruz, but I was sure that he wouldn't get hurt. After all, Frankie had been boxing since he was six years old.

    Frankie won by ninth-round knockout, and Harry didn't talk to me for about six months after that. . . . .

    -------

    ...LOL!!...soon after this fight I got fired and since Frankie was working for me; he had to go too. The owner said we were spending too much time on the fight game. It worked out for us though, within a couple of week I landed a better paying job, one mile from our house, at our local Chevy dealer. There the owner loved us, we couldn't do no wrong. He and his wife started attending Frankie and Tony's fights, on our dime of course....LOL!!
    Last edited by kikibalt; 09-07-2011 at 08:03 AM.

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    Re: History of California Boxing in Photos



    Oscar De La Hoya (R)...La Parrilla..East Los Angeles

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