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Thread: Razor Ruddock Re-Invents Himself

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    Razor Ruddock Re-Invents Himself

    Razor reinvents himself

    RON BULL/TORONTO STAR



    When he was a hard-hitting heavyweight contender earning seven-figure purses, Toronto's Donovan (Razor) Ruddock rolled with a 20-person entourage.

    Ruddock has retained at least some of that money – he arrives at a Woodbridge health club in a gleaming white BMW with tinted windows and Florida licence plate. But the crew's much smaller now. Only his wife, his daughter, a niece and a nephew accompany him today.

    It's been five years since Ruddock's last pro bout, and fifteen since the wars with Mike Tyson that defined his career.

    A decade ago his toughest fights were in court with creditors and ex-girlfriends, but the Razor says he's back and sharper than ever.

    Ruddock, 43, is reinventing himself – as an inventor.

    These days he's hawking a trash compactor he designed called "The Boxer," and he's banking on his name and ring fame to generate George Foreman-sized buzz.

    But Ruddock insists he's not the stereotypical broke ex-boxer. He's just a businessman.

    "Everybody needs money," Ruddock says. "Donald Trump doesn't stop working, so why is it so different for me to make a living. It's an honest living. I do need money, but it's also a great product."

    Ruddock traces his reinvention to a friendly bet he made four years ago with his current wife, Tritcha.

    She was sick of using her hands to cram trash into garbage cans around the house, so the Ruddocks had a contest: they each sketched out a trash compactor, and decided to try to market whichever design looked better. Donovan's design – which included a lever that would squash garbage better than your hands ever could – won the bet.

    He called a patenting agent, who learned that no similar product had been invented yet.

    Ruddock, retired from the ring and working as an online day trader, decided to follow up, but soon learned the path from blueprint to lucrative product is about as smooth as the road to a heavyweight title.

    He had to find engineer to tell him how the contraption he had drawn would look in real life. Then dropped $15,000 on a prototype. And began the long, and still ongoing, process of securing patents in Canada, the U.S. and abroad.

    By late 2005, after three years of work, "The Boxer" finally hit the market.

    Ruddock, a two-time Canadian champion, welcomes the inevitable comparisons to George Foreman, the former world champion who has made millions lending his name to a line of grills. But Ruddock makes a crucial distinction between himself and Big George.

    Ruddock is the creator, not just the namesake.

    "I'm honoured to be compared with George but I don't want people to get the wrong idea about the product," Ruddock says. "I'm the one who created this thing from paper. That's the difference."

    Foreman may lack Ruddock's ingenuity, but the Razor can't match Big George's profile – or his sales.

    By the time he retired for good in 1997, Foreman was a three-time world champ with a name and face familiar to consumers worldwide. Meanwhile, Ruddock lost his biggest fights against Mike Tyson (twice) and Lennox Lewis, and never competed for a major world title. He's as well known as the men he defeated — Michael Dokes, Bonecrusher Smith, Mike Weaver — but not as famous as the men who beat him.

    While Foreman hyped his product on infomercials, Ruddock's TV presence is limited to a 75 second commercial featuring boxing highlights, a woman struggling with her garbage, and Ruddock, his disembodied head appearing Max Headroom-style in the woman's trash can, urging her to "fight back" against garbage.

    The grill bearing Foreman's name sells between 8 million and 10 million units a year. About two years ago Foreman sold naming rights to the grill to Salton Inc. for $137 million (all figures U.S.) in cash and stock.

    Ruddock, meanwhile, has sold 400 trash compactors through his website, www.razorruddock.com, but says sales will take off once "The Boxer" becomes available in stores. Ruddock didn't say when that would happen but says he's negotiating with several retailers.

    Ruddock's older brother Delroy shares that confidence.

    "I didn't know exactly how it was going to work, but he was motivated enough to make it work, and he did," says Delroy, who managed Ruddock during his early 1990s run through the heavyweight division. "There's a million products out there. You just have to try and market it as best you can. If it catches on ... boom! If the right people talk about it, it makes all the difference in the world."

    You can also trace Ruddock's reinvention to a roadwork session in 2001. He was 37, living in Ft. Lauderdale and training for a Canadian heavyweight title fight against Toronto's Egerton Marcus. While jogging Ruddock's left arm went numb, then limp. Tests revealed he might have nerve damage. The feeling eventually returned to his arm, but Ruddock already knew that the Marcus fight, which he won, would be his last.

    Ruddock's previous transition to life outside the ring hadn't gone smoothly. After losing to American Tommy Morrison in 1995, Ruddock took a layoff that nearly ruined him.

    He lost $1 million when his Ft. Lauderdale night club, Razor's Palace, folded. He later declared bankruptcy.

    He fought with his ex girlfriend over custody of their son. In 1997 he was charged after allegedly forcibly taking back a diamond ring he had given her.

    A contract dispute with his brother Delroy caused a temporary split between the men.

    It took Ruddock three years to solve his personal problems, and three more years of fighting followed. By October, 2001, he hadn't won a world title, but he'd attained something even more rare among faded boxing stars: an honest opinion of his own ability.

    He says he stopped boxing because he knew he'd never again perform the way he did in 1991, in two hard-fought losses to Mike Tyson.

    Ruddock now weighs 260 pounds, about 20 above his fighting weight. Before dawn most mornings he's in the boxing studio at Xcel Fitness in Woodbridge, pounding a heavy bag for eight rounds.

    So while 44-year-old Evander Holyfield keeps chasing a world title, Ruddock sticks to selling trash compactors.

    "A lot of fighters come out of the ring very hurt," he says. "I've seen a couple of them. I might have made a couple of them. I didn't want to go back and fight when I'm 50 years old. That don't appeal to me. I'm not taking no chances with my health."

    He says he doesn't need the quick payday a comeback might bring. Despite the bankruptcy, Ruddock owns homes in Woodbridge, Fort Lauderdale and Jamaica – each with a "Boxer." His investors include his brother Delroy, and Ruddock says he has put $500,000 of his own into the project.

    And when you're that deeply invested, he says, returning to the ring has no appeal.

    "I'm very happy. I'm excited," he says. "I'm happy that I have something to do, a journey."

  2. #2
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    Re: Razor Ruddock Re-Invents Himself

    That is wonderful and I wish Donovan the best of luck with his new enterprize.

    He was a gentleman in the ring, in the dressing room and afterward.

    blessings,

    Ron Lipton

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    Re: Razor Ruddock Re-Invents Himself

    I saw an interview on TV the other day up here in Toronto with Donovan talking about his product as well as briefly discussing his boxing career. He spoke of today's heavyweight situation and today's boxing scene in general. He looks good, hasn't seemed to have aged a bit since I last saw him in the ring and was his usual smiling, laughing amiable self. Good to see him get out the ring with his health still intact.

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    Re: Razor Ruddock Re-Invents Himself

    I wish someone who knows him, would go up to him and tell him Referee Ron Lipton says hello, wishes him the best, and would like to write him.

    thanks,

    Ron

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    Re: Razor Ruddock Re-Invents Himself

    Quote Originally Posted by Ron Lipton
    I wish someone who knows him, would go up to him and tell him Referee Ron Lipton says hello, wishes him the best, and would like to write him.

    thanks,

    Ron
    Mr Lipton, I did a Google search for you and found this.


    P.O. Box #0142, 3426 Weston Road
    North York, ON, M9M 2W1, Canada.

    Call Toll Free
    1.888.766.7228

    More Info & Enquiries
    info@razorruddock.com

    After Sales Support:
    Support@razorruddock.com


    Taken from his website

    http://www.razorruddock.com/index.html

    Hope this helps you get in contact with him.

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    Re: Razor Ruddock Re-Invents Himself

    Thanks buddy,
    I will try to say hello to him through those sites.

    best,

    Ron

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    Re: Razor Ruddock Re-Invents Himself

    Razor Ruddock: Devastating Puncher Is Now an Inventor!
    INTERVIEW By Sean Newman from Dog House Boxing

    In the 1990’s, Donovan “Razor” Ruddock was one of the most feared heavyweight punchers on the planet. His frightening knockout of Michael Dokes is one to remember, when three straight left hand “Smashes” left Dokes slumping down to the mat to lay motionless for minutes. Ruddock defeated four former heavyweight champions during his career, fought Mike Tyson in two memorable fights, and was named as one of the 100 hardest punchers of all-time by The Ring Magazine.


    Today, having been retired from boxing for over five years, Ruddock is looking to score a knockout as the inventor of a useful new product called ‘The Boxer Compactor’, which his website, www.razorruddock.com (a live link is provided below), describes as a ‘manually operated trash compactor that is affordable and easy to use.’ ‘The Boxer Compactor’ came into existence as a result of a bet between Ruddock and his wife, with Razor’s idea winning out. Razor recently took time to speak with Doghouse Boxing on this and other topics, including his fights with Tyson, Lennox Lewis, and the real story behind his loss to David Jaco. Here’s hoping that Ruddock’s invention is as successful as he was in the ring. Read on to see what he had to say.

    Sean Newman: Hi, Razor, Happy New Year. How is everything?

    Razor Ruddock: Happy New Year to you too, my friend. Everything is well, I can’t complain.

    SN: Let’s talk about your boxing career first. How did you come up with the nickname ‘Razor?’

    RR: It’s because I was in the Canadian Army Reserves and I used to box, and when I would hit people I would cut them so they started calling me ‘Razor.’

    SN: Every time I hear the song ‘The Harder They Come’ by Jimmy Cliff, I think about you walking to the ring. What made you pick that song and stick with it? Was it just a personal favorite of yours?

    RR: Yeah, it is a favorite and it kind of explains the way I fight, you know? The harder they come, the harder they fall.

    SN: Next, I wanted to know how you came up with ‘The Smash,’ which was a hybrid left hook/uppercut.

    RR: I was trying to break through defenses because other punches just weren’t working. I decided to try something new, create and throw an uppercut right up the middle.

    SN: The ‘smash’ nearly killed Michael Dokes, or so it appeared at first.

    RR: (laughs) I know.

    SN: Were you concerned for him after that fight ended?

    RR: I know, most people thought that. I never intended on doing that. It’s just that that’s what boxing is all about. There was nothing personal about it. I mean, he was trying to do the same thing to me, and fortunately, I did it to him first. No animosity at all, that’s just the business. I knew he would come around. I wasn’t too worried.

    SN: You lost a fight by eighth-round TKO to Dave Jaco. It’s been said that you had an asthma attack which led to the end of the fight. Once and for all, could you give us your version of what happened in that fight?

    RR: Yes, I did have asthma. I was winning the fight, I knocked him down, but the guy was tough. I was inexperienced, coming up and starting out. The doctor stopped the fight in the corner. I fought Tyson with asthma as well.

    SN: Having fought two wars with Mike Tyson, what are your thoughts about him?

    RR: To tell you the truth, I feel sympathy for him. I wish I could help him. I think he lost his way. I mean, despite the fact that he may not like me, I don’t dislike Tyson.

    SN: So the things he said about making you his girlfriend and all of that didn’t bother you?

    RR: No, that’s just his personality. You can’t really pay Tyson any mind. It’s just his personality. It never really bothered me.

    SN: Watching the fight from an unbiased standpoint as much as you can, do you think the stoppage by (referee) Richard Steele was justified in your first fight with Mike?

    RR: No, it wasn’t. It was definitely not right at all to do that. He had closer ties to Don King, that’s the reason why he did that.

    SN: How difficult was it to fight in the rematch with a broken jaw and how do you think that affected the outcome of the fight?

    RR: It obviously affected the outcome tremendously. You understand when you have a broken jaw, that that is a tremendous thing to have to fight with. But because of the fact that I am a warrior, I refused to give up; I refused to say that I will lose. I decided to fight through it. I didn’t want to give Tyson the benefit of saying that he had stopped me twice.

    SN: Did you ever give thought to a third fight with Tyson?

    RR: No, I never really thought about it. The fact is that it never really interested me. I did what I had to do in the two fights we had, and it was done.

    SN: You were expected by many to win your fight against Lennox Lewis. What happened in that fight? Did you just get caught?

    RR: Yes, I just got caught, but realistically the fact of the matter is that Tyson and I finished each other. Lewis fought a shell of us both; he would have never wanted to fight us when we were still fresh. It’s true, he got a shell of us, and we weren’t the same after we fought each other. We fought two brutal wars. His eardrum was busted in the second fight and my jaw was broken, and we were just never the same.

    SN: You had a long layoff before fighting Tommy Morrison, and there were problems prior to the bout with your promoter. Were you physically and mentally in shape for that fight?

    RR: Yes, there were problems, but I don’t like to complain or make excuses. But yes, there were problems before the fight. I just went through with it because I come to fight. I think I was physically in shape. I don’t think I was totally mentally in shape. I could have beaten Tommy Morrison, no problem at all.

    SN: Morrison hit you with a tremendous left hook, but you bounced right back up. Do you think the referee stopped the fight too quickly there as well?

    RR: The referee stopped the fight way too early, trust me. You see what happens, when they got the opportunity to stop the fight on me, they would use that opportunity, because they were afraid of me. Tyson was afraid of me, Lennox Lewis was afraid of me, Morrison was afraid…I mean, the fact is when they get me in a compromising position it’s easy for the referee to stop the fight on my part because they know I’m dangerous.

    SN: You embarked on another comeback and then retired after winning the Canadian heavyweight title with a victory over Egerton Marcus. Why did you stop fighting?

    RR: I was jogging in the park in Fort Lauderdale and I realized that my left arm was hanging by my left side and I couldn’t hold it up. I decided that was the end. I decided I don’t want to take any chances with my health because if you stay in there too long you get hurt. There are a lot of fighters who hang on too long, and if I had hung around, you would have been talking to me and saying ‘what a shame.’ I stopped fighting and look what I’ve come back and done.

    SN: Just a couple more questions about boxing. You never got a title shot despite being one of the top contenders in the division for a long time. Was that a result of politics, were you just in the wrong place at the wrong time, or were there other reasons why you never got that shot?

    RR: Wrong place at the wrong time, and I just accept it. I have no regrets at all, trust me, I have no regrets. I’ll tell you the truth, I feel sorry for Tyson more than I feel sorry for myself, even though he won the title.

    SN: There are several top heavyweight fighters of the 1990’s that you never faced. If you could choose just one that you would have liked to have fought, who would it be and why?

    RR: Evander Holyfield. I think I could have taken him. He was champion at the time, and he didn’t want to fight me.

    SN: This is a standard question asked of heavyweight fighters of previous eras: What are your thoughts on the current heavyweight division?

    RR: I haven’t been following boxing because I’ve been so busy. I did my time in boxing, I enjoyed it, it was good to me, and I just have to move on. You have to know when to leave. You can’t stay there forever.

    SN: Please tell us about your invention, ‘The Boxer Compactor.’

    RR: It’s doing well. I’m very excited and happy, and I’m glad that I’m the one who invented the product. They’ve been trying to invent a product like this since 1901 and they never got it. My wife is the one who really wanted something to compact garbage. We joined together at the same time to see which of us could create something like that. It was amazing. I drew my diagram and she drew hers, and she threw away hers because she realized mine was better. She said, “You’re telling me there is no one else out there who invented this thing?” and I said no. I’m negotiating right now to get it in stores. They’re very interested in the product. After you use this, you will never go back to the traditional way again. It makes too much sense. If you can compact the garbage and have extra space in the bag, wouldn’t you do that?

    SN: Thanks for taking the time to speak with me, Razor. It’s been an honor.

    Writer’s Note: I would like to thank Tyson4lyfe of The Dog Pound for his efforts in trying to set up this interview, along with his friend, Dominique Hill. This may not be an Oscar award acceptance speech, but I’d also like to thank Razor himself for being a true gentleman. It’s always a pleasure to speak with men who conduct themselves with as much class outside the ring as they do inside of it.

    For more information about Razor Ruddock and his new invention ‘The Boxer Compactor,’ we encourage you to visit www.razorruddock.com.

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