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Thread: Brooklyn's Finest: Terrible Terry McGovern

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    Brooklyn's Finest: Terrible Terry McGovern

    Brooklyn’s Finest: Terrible Terry McGovern


    A CBZ Exclusive by Mike Casey


    Here’s a mischievous old story about the featherweight championship fight between Terry McGovern and Aurelio Herrera in 1901, and I will give you the flip side of the coin when you reach the other side.
    When Herrera entered the ring at the Mechanics Pavilion in San Francisco, somebody of considerable note was conveniently perched nearby.

    Legendary referee Joe Humphreys had travelled out to California with McGovern and was sitting in a chair behind Aurelio’s corner nattily attired in boots and a big Stetson. Joe wasted no time in approaching Herrera, all too eager to dispense some kindly, paternal advice.

    “Listen, kid,” Humphreys said, “I’ve bet the works on you and you’ve got the biggest chance in the world. I’ve been east and seen this guy McGovern and he ain’t so much. All he’s got is a kick, and if he puts you down you’ve got to watch yourself when you get up. If he should knock you down, take your time. Don’t get up in a hurry.

    “I’m going to stay right back of your corner and if McGovern should drop you, you turn and watch me and I’ll wave my hand when it’s time to get up. Don’t pay any attention to anyone else. I know this bird and I’ll give you the office. You gotta win and I’ll split 50/50 what I take off these birds. Remember, now – keep your eye on me.”

    Aurelio Herrera nodded his head. “I’ll remember,” he said.

    Herrera was a tremendous puncher who had the smarts to go with his power. Writer Joe Williams memorably described the little destroyer from San Jose as “… a savage hitter and shrewd as a Shylock.”

    Against McGovern, Aurelio stormed into battle, full of confidence. Terrible Terry, as furious a whirlwind as there ever was in a ring, found himself being bashed and buffeted by a hurricane. The champion was in all sorts of trouble as Herrera winged in damaging punches. Repeatedly Terry was struck by numbing blows to the chin and was dazed and tiring after four rounds of furious action.

    Terry McGovern couldn’t run or play hide and seek. It just wasn’t in his nature. When he came out for the fifth round, it was with simple instructions from manager Sam Harris to go hell for leather and knock Herrera out.

    The two fighters engaged like a pair of charging bulls and McGovern suddenly uncorked a big shot to send Herrera to his knees. Aurelio needed a friend and he looked to the kindly Joe Humphreys and awaited the signal. Joe looked back and never removed his hands from his pockets. Herrera was counted out. His big chance had gone and so too had Mr Humphreys by the time the puzzled challenger sought him out.

    That, folks, is our mischievous story. A story of a classic sting and a good man wronged. The flip side of the coin? Well, in more candid times when boxing writers spoke with far greater freedom, Aurelio Herrera was often referred to as ‘a touch yellow’ when the going got tough against the true major league hitters.

    Whatever the truth of that juicy old chestnut, few ever doubted that Terry McGovern, from Brooklyn, New York, was a major league hitter of the highest pedigree.

    There is really no overly fancy way of describing McGovern’s relentless and intimidating style of fighting. As my fellow historian Tracy Callis says: “Terry came out swinging at the opening bell. He was aggressive and attacking in style, a relentless, hard-hitting offensive machine. He wasted no time in feeling his man out, his main objective being the total destruction of the other man. He went right to work at taking his man out and was often compared to Jack Dempsey, the heavyweight champion, in that respect.

    “McGovern applied constant pressure as he stalked his man. From his moderate crouch, he was a terrific head and body puncher. His left hook was hard and his right was fast and explosive to his opponent’s chin or heart area.

    “Like Bob Fitzsimmons, Joe Choynski, Joe Walcott and Stanley Ketchel, Terry’s explosive punching power far exceeded his size. Some contend he could be easily outboxed, but he applied so much pressure that even the best of boxers made mistakes in avoiding him. One false move and it could be over.

    “The list of fighters McGovern beat includes Joe Gans, George Dixon, Frank Erne, Oscar Gardner, Harry Forbes, Casper Leon, Thomas ‘Pedlar’ Palmer, Eddie Santry, Aurelio Herrera, Jimmy Briggs, Tim Callahan, Joe Bernstein, Sammy Kelly, Tommy Sullivan, Tommy White, Eddie Avery, George Munroe, Patsy Haley, Austin Rice and Billy Rotchford.

    “Among those who recognised the greatness in McGovern were DeWitt Van Court (boxing instructor of the Los Angeles AC), Charles Mathison (New York state boxing judge and veteran sportswriter), Biddy Bishop (old-time fighter, manager and boxing promoter), Bill Duffy (old-time fight manager), boxing historians Jack Hare and Alexander Johnston, sportswriter Thomas S Rice and Ring magazine writer, Francis Albertanti.”

    Hitter

    There is really nothing that can adequately prepare a fighter for getting hit by a true hitter. Confidence, positive thinking and hypnosis are delicate and temporary shields against the dreadful force of shock. We repeatedly saw emphatic evidence of this fact in the peak career of Mike Tyson, as bodies were broken and senses were shattered. The vanquished so often looked as if they had stared into the eyes of Mephistopheles. Watch the expression of stunned disbelief on the face of Trevor Berbick as his communication cord is cut. Even as his legs assume a scrambled mind of their own, Berbick still cannot believe his fate.

    Terry McGovern’s power shocked opponents in a similar way. Men of great experience and sound technical knowledge would come prepared and then be rendered mindless and clueless by the cold reality. Nat Fleischer, among others, estimated Terry’s punching power to be equivalent to that of a middleweight.

    McGovern, of Irish stock, was a gifted athlete who might have become similarly famous as a baseball star. He practised regularly with the major league New York and Brooklyn teams and rejected a number of offers to turn professional.

    Born in Johnstown, Pennsylvania, and raised in Brooklyn, Terry had been a professional fighter for just over two years when he fought Johnny Ritchie at the Westchester Athletic Club in New York in the summer of 1899. The bout was billed for the American bantamweight championship over 25 rounds and McGovern started only a slight favourite. One crack from his left hook in the third round concluded matters. Ritchie was out and Terry had begun his inexorable march to greatness.

    Just two months later he was back at the same venue, challenging England’s Pedlar Palmer for the world bantamweight championship. Now here’s a little tale about that fight which, though not at all unusual for the era, certainly has a modern day ring to it. McGovern and Palmer weighed in at five o’clock in the morning on the eve of the fight, with Terry holding a one-pound advantage at 116 1/2lbs. By fight time, the guess among writers was that Pedlar was around 121, while Terry looked nearer 130.

    The ring was pitched in the middle of a stockade, with seating to accommodate a crowd of 10,000. Ticket prices ranged from three to fifteen dollars and some 9,000 people attended. The distinguished guests included Tom Sharkey, Bob Fitzsimmons, Kid McCoy, Jim Corbett and the old strong boy himself, John L Sullivan.

    They had come to watch a fight that would last for just two minutes and thirty-two seconds as Palmer was simply overwhelmed and brutally swept away. Even McGovern’s supporters hadn’t reckoned that their man could win in such quick and devastating fashion. Palmer’s superior skill and movement was simply swamped by Terry’s power and aggression.

    Palmer forced the pace, quite clearly confident of his chances as he shot out the left jab, but he was quickly in trouble from McGovern’s return fire and constant pressure. It didn’t take Terry long to manoeuvre the battle to close quarters, where he scored heavily with half-arm punches, favouring a right to the jaw and a follow-up right to the body. McGovern punched continuously with both hands in a quick and brutal exhibition of cold power, although he was forced to take a frustrating time-out before applying the coup de grace.

    The boys had been fighting for a minute when the timekeeper accidentally hit the gong. McGovern and Palmer went to their corners and resumed fighting after twelve seconds. McGovern scored with a left and a right to the head, but Palmer countered him. Pedlar went into a crouch and used his left to try and fend off the oncoming McGovern, but the champion didn’t see the fast and sudden left hook to the head that sent him tumbling to the canvas.

    Palmer was up at ‘four’ but clearly shaken as Terry bulled him to the ropes and went to work with both hands. McGovern was being too rash in his attempts to finish the fight, and Palmer’s instinct took over as he ducked and avoided the follow-up blows with great skill. But Terry kept punching and Pedlar was forced to crouch and seek refuge in a clinch. As the fighters broke, McGovern struck Palmer with a hard right over the heart and then cracked a left hook off his chin. Palmer was badly shaken and began to stagger as Terry saw his chance to bring down the curtain.

    Another big right sent Pedlar crashing to the mat and into a semi-conscious state. He made a gallant attempt to get to his feet, but McGovern was already turning to his seconds and raising his arms in victory. Referee George Siler counted Palmer out and the fallen champion’s handlers rushed into the ring to escort their man back to his corner.

    A scene of mild chaos followed as some of Terry’s supporters invaded the ring to present their hero with a floral horseshoe, which was quickly picked apart by voracious souvenir hunters. John L Sullivan then got up into the ring and called at McGovern to shake Palmer’s hand. Terry duly obliged and headed for his dressing room. Palmer, having regained his senses, was able to walk from the ring.

    Surprised but overjoyed by the speedy manner of his great triumph, McGovern told reporters: “I don’t know what to say. It came off much quicker than I expected. I thought it would certainly go on at least ten rounds or maybe seventeen, but I had no doubt as to the result. I never felt Palmer hit me and I’m sure he was unable to touch me with any effect. I am now ready to meet them as they come, George Dixon first and the rest in their proper order.”

    Terry didn’t find himself short of offers. Tom O’Rourke, on behalf of George Dixon, challenged McGovern at 116lbs for $5,000 a side. The manager of Oscar (The Omaha Kid) Gardner also pitched in with a challenge to fight McGovern at any weight from 114lbs up for $10,000 a side.

    Champion

    George Dixon, the brilliant little magician they called Little Chocolate, went out like the true champion he was at the Broadway Athletic Club in New York. And it did indeed seem that the slight and ghostly little master from Canada had been the champion of the world forever.

    But Dixon was on the wane, a leopard fast losing its speed and reflexes, and just about ripe for a rampaging young lion like Terry McGovern. By the time the hunt was over on the night of January 9, 1900, McGovern was the proud owner of both the bantamweight and featherweight championships.

    Dixon, hustled and punched out of the battle after eight torrid rounds, had been knocked out of a fight only once before in his illustrious career, and only then after being cruelly duped by the gloriously named Kentucky Rosebud, alias Walter Edgerton.

    In dethroning the great Dixon, Terry McGovern impressed many boxing observers, who were quick to point out how rapidly Terry had progressed into a much cleverer and more cunning fighter. Although favoured to beat Dixon, the Brooklyn boy knew that he would have a fight on his hands. George’s preparation for the battle had been long and thorough, including a stay at the West Baden Springs and three weeks of hard training near Lakewood in New Jersey.

    It was noted at the weigh-in that Dixon looked in superb shape, while McGovern looked tight and drawn. George certainly looked a picture of confidence in the opening round, as he took the role of the aggressor and frequently led with left hooks and swings. McGovern, demonstrating his fast improving ring education, avoided many of these blows by stepping neatly inside the champion. He attacked Dixon’s body with great vigour, bringing a look of mild surprise to George’s face. Few men had been able to reach the master’s ribs and kidneys.

    Dixon repeatedly found the mark with jarring punches to the head and jaw, but McGovern took the punishment well and it failed to deter his aggressive march. Time and again, the stomach and the ribs were Terry’s targets. George’s task suddenly looked mountainous in the seventh round as McGovern’s relentless attack and lusty punching began to take effect. Arguably the watershed of the battle was when Terry nearly broke Dixon’s nose with a right hand smash. All at once, that one blow seemed to visibly drain the fading champion. At the gong, blood gushed from the damaged nose as he walked unsteadily back to his corner.

    George made a good recovering and fought back bravely in what would prove to be the fateful eighth round. But the champion was clearly unsteady and vulnerable. He slipped to the floor coming out of a clinch and McGovern earned a round of applause by helping Dixon to his feet. George’s poor balance and his general bearing were sending out all the right signals to a hungry hunter of Terry’s ferocity. Dixon slipped a second time after treading on a wet patch near McGovern’s corner, and the marauding challenger seemed to sense that his opponent was ready for the kill.

    Terry tore into George, flooring him with a volley of lefts and rights. Dixon took his time getting to his feet and McGovern was poised to follow up as he hovered just four feet away. A body blow put George down for the second time and then Terry ran riot as he decked the broken champion a further six times. Most of the knockdown came from the withering effects of McGovern’s body assaults. When George gamely arose for the eighth time, manager Tom O’Rourke threw in the sponge.

    Beaten and tired, Dixon spoke little in the aftermath, but said that he had never faced any fighter greater than McGovern. It was George’s contention that Terry, in prime condition, would see off any man of his weight in the world.

    McGovern told reporters that he had been confident of ending the fight before the tenth round, but added that he had never faced a better opponent than Dixon.

    Close, But No Oscar

    Terry McGovern relished the challenge of overcoming adversity in much the same way as Stanley Ketchel and Jack Dempsey. The roof doesn’t cave in for such men when the going gets tough. It blows right off from the force of their indignation.

    On March 9,1900, at the Broadway Athletic Club in New York, Oscar Gardner must have thought he was on his way to winning the featherweight championship of the world. Moving well and boxing smartly, Oscar saw his opening in the first round and floored Terry McGovern with a peach of a left to the jaw.

    The world must have seemed a beautiful place for Gardner at that point in time. Somebody had handed him an impossibly difficult jigsaw and he was slotting the pieces into place like a born genius. Then Mr McGovern got a tad angry. Embarrassed by his unusual predicament, he got up and launched one of the most vicious attacks of his thunderous reign when he came out refreshed for the second round.

    He tore into Oscar, flooring him with a left. The torrent of blows kept coming from McGovern as he decked the dazed and disoriented Gardner twice more. So fast and hard were the champion’s punches that Oscar could neither protect himself nor fire back. He showed tremendous pluck in hauling himself up from the knockdowns, barely beating the count on each occasion. But Terry had him.

    There was no slackening of pace, no lull or measuring process as McGovern charged in for the kill in the third round. A left hook to the jaw sent Oscar staggering towards the ropes and a cracking right to the face had him in complete disarray. A final left hook to the head finished the fight and cemented Terry McGovern’s place as the world’s premier featherweight. He would knock out Oscar Gardner for a second time a year later at San Francisco.

    Crash

    The great crash was heard around the world when Terry McGovern’s star sensationally fell out of the sky. Terry’s reign as featherweight champion was just two months short of two years when Young Corbett II registered that stunning second round knockout of McGovern that still makes us blink when we see it in the record book.

    Was Terry’s star of the shooting variety? Some posed the question then and some pose it today. Well, here was a man who had engaged in 63 recorded battles going into the Corbett fight, battles that had been waged in one of the toughest and most unforgiving eras boxing ever saw.

    If McGovern were meeting Corbett at the MGM Grand next week, would we not be questioning Terry’s wisdom in taking a possible fight too many? Sixty-three fights! Dear, oh dear, we would likely be describing him as battle-worn, battle-scarred, and in total denial.

    I think the simple story of the Corbett fight was that Terry McGovern ran into the one man who would always beat him. Some of us wander pleasantly through life without ever meeting that certain person who can whip us at everything. Others aren’t so fortunate. It is equally important to remember that Corbett was a tough, tenacious, canny fighter who would feature highly in the all-time featherweight rankings for many years afterwards. Billy Rothwell, as was his given name, was also fearless; a priceless quality against McGovern, whose reputation as a destroyer could shred opponents mentally as well as physically.

    For all that, McGovern’s fall from his seemingly sturdy pedestal was indeed a mighty shock. ‘TERRY McGOVERN MEETS HIS MASTER’, blared one headline. The fight at the Nutmeg Athletic Club in Hartford was over after just one minute and forty-four seconds of ferocious fighting. McGovern was outfought and out-thought by a man of similar steel and power.

    Corbett, fighting out of Denver, was almost perfect in the way he executed his victory. The sense of disappointment felt by the New York fans who had travelled up to Hartford was compared to the grief felt when John L Sullivan met his Waterloo at the fast hands of another Corbett, the great James J.

    McGovern looked superbly fit, but he couldn’t match Young Corbett’s speed. The first round, fought at a breakneck pace, was an earlier version of that unforgettable opening session between Marvin Hagler and Thomas Hearns. Terry and Corbett lashed at each other with a fury, both looking as though they might fall at any moment. It was clear, however, that Corbett’s work was more controlled and that McGovern was putting himself peril. Terry was placing all his faith in his big left hook and leaving himself worryingly open for damaging counter punches.

    Corbett was far more composed and seemed to have an answer for everything McGovern did. But Terry kept charging in and ripping away, as if believing he were invincible. Then it happened. Corbett cracked a hard right to the jaw that sent McGovern crashing onto his back. The crowd gasped and could scarcely believe what it was seeing. Terry’s admirable powers of recuperation helped him to his feet at the count of seven, but suddenly he seemed vulnerable and drained of strength.

    He survived the round cleverly by hustling and punching his way back into the fray, but Corbett’s accurate countering now bore an ominous look. When McGovern got back to his corner, he told his handlers, “That’s the toughest guy I ever met, but I’ll lick him just as soon as I see an opening.”

    It was not to be. Corbett had Terry’s number now and the knockout was not long in coming in the second round. Fighting on the defensive, Corbett checked McGovern’s charges with accurately placed left jabs and then floored him with a left uppercut. Not accustomed to such treatment, Terry fatally lost his temper at that point. The red mist descended and all he could do was play into Corbett’s hands by rushing in recklessly.

    However, it was a gloriously defiant attack on McGovern’s part, which brought new heart to his supporters. Incredibly, the fight was still in the balance, but then Terry made his biggest error. Corbett feinted and threw a grazing right as McGovern sidestepped. It didn’t seem a greatly significant moment, but then Corbett feinted again during a vicious exchange and nailed Terry with another right – the knockout punch!

    McGovern tried gamely to beat the count as his disbelieving supporters cried at him to get up. He didn’t make it.

    A happy Corbett told reporters: “I was sure I could beat McGovern and my opinion was based on what I had seen and heard of him. I felt that I had him from the first punch, but I was cool-headed all the way through. When I began to sting him he lost his head, and when he lost his head it was all over. I had him right there, and with a right swinging uppercut I landed the blow which won the battle.”

    McGovern was philosophical in the aftermath. “Well, you can’t tell how things can be accounted for. I hope to make another match with Corbett and I am more than confident that he will not be able to put it over me again.”

    Corbett did put it over McGovern again. In March, 1903, he knocked out Terry in eleven rounds at San Francisco.

    Epilogue

    There is, of course, another massive entry on the record of Terry McGovern, that of fellow legend Joe Gans. On December 13, 1900, McGovern apparently knocked out Gans in two rounds at Malachi Hogan’s Saloon in Chicago.

    I won’t venture into great detail about this unfortunate chapter in boxing, since it is currently a mighty subject all of its own in the form of a feisty thread in our Old Timers section. Many will tell you the knockout was legitimate. Many others will violently disagree. The simple facts are that Joe Gans, one of the greatest defensive wizards of all time, was knocked down seven times in a highly odious affair that chased boxing out of Illinois for nearly thirty years. Joe looked almost thespian-like at times, though certainly no Larry Olivier.

    After the fight, Joe told a Chicago Times-Herald reporter, “The better man won. I did not ‘lay down’. I was hit hard early in the fight and that seemed to take the wind out of me. I don’t think there is anyone who can stand up to McGovern at the lightweight limit.”

    Yet Al Goldstein, of the Baltimore Sun, later wrote: “Only a month before, the battlers had staged a ‘friendly’ unrecorded fight at Poth’s Roadhouse in Westchester, NY, and Gans, according to observers, had given the harassed Brooklyn brawler a four-round boxing lesson.”

    Well, folks, maybe and maybe not. For what my opinion is worth, I believe that a prime Joe Gans, trying his utmost, would have seen off Terry McGovern or any other man of similar poundage, past or present.


    Mike Casey is a boxing journalist and historian and Special Features Writer for the Cyber Boxing Zone. He is a member of the International Boxing Research Organization (IBRO), an auxiliary member of the Boxing Writers Association of America and founder and editor of the Grand Slam Premium Boxing Service for historians and fans (www.grandslampage.net).

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    Re: Brooklyn's Finest: Terrible Terry McGovern

    My thanks to my good pal and our resident historian, Tracy Callis, for his input on this feature.

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    Re: Brooklyn's Finest: Terrible Terry McGovern

    Thanks Mike

    Mcgovern has become a favorite of mine. Not many fighters have as many great stories surrounding them and as always you found some new ones.


    Iskigoe

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    Re: Brooklyn's Finest: Terrible Terry McGovern

    Here is a pretty good record for McGovern, though it is incomplete, not bout wise, but I still plan to paraphrase reports for all of his fights.


    Terry McGovern
    (John Terrance McGovern)
    “Terrible Terry,” “The Brooklyn Terror”
    Born: March 9 1880; Johnstown, Pennsylvania
    Died: February 26 1918, Brooklyn, New York
    Ht: 5’ 4”
    Wt: 112-127
    Reach: 67”
    Race: White/Irish-American
    Manager: Jimmy Dunn, Sam Harris, and Joe Humphreys
    Career: 1897-1908

    Total Bouts: 80
    67-7-6 (44 KO)



    1897
    Apr 3 Jack Snee Brooklyn, NY (Greenwood AC) L DQ 4
    Apr 17 Frank Barnes Brooklyn, NY (Greenwood AC) W PTS 10
    May 3 Eddie Avery New York, NY (Polo AC) W PTS 4
    May 22 Kid Dougherty Brooklyn, NY (Greenwood AC) W PTS 10
    Jun 7 Tom McDermott Brooklyn, NY (Greenpoint SC) W PTS 10
    Jun 19 “Brooklyn” Tommy Sullivan Brooklyn, NY (Greenwood AC) D PTS 10
    Aug 16 Eddie Goodbody Brooklyn, NY (Greenwood AC) W PTS 10
    Aug 23 Billy Barrett Brooklyn, NY (Greenpoint SC) W PTS 10
    Sep 18 Jack Leon Brooklyn, NY (Greenwood AC) W KO 7
    Oct 2 Jack Reagan Brooklyn, NY (Greenwood AC) W TKO 6
    --Some sources list Johnny Reagan.
    Oct 9 Jack Doyle Brooklyn, NY (Greenwood AC) W TKO 7
    Oct 23 Eddie Goodbody Brooklyn, NY (Greenwood AC) D PTS 4
    Nov 13 Harry Peterson New York, NY (Polo AC) W PTS 6
    Dec 18 Charles Roden New York, NY (Polo AC) W PTS 6
    Dec 31 Jimmy Kelly Brooklyn, NY (National AC) W KO 2

    1898
    Feb 25 Billy Maynard Yonkers, NY (Waverly AC) W PTS 8
    Mar 12 Pinkey Evans Yonkers, NY (Waverly AC) W PTS 8
    Apr 15 Fred Mayo Waterbury, CT (Jacques’ Auditorium) W KO 6
    May 5 George Monroe Yonkers, NY (Waverly AC) D PTS 20
    Jun 11 George Monroe Brooklyn, NY (Greater New York AC) W KO 24
    Jul 23 Tim Callahan Brooklyn, NY (Pelican AC) L DQ 11
    Aug 4 George Monroe Brooklyn, NY (Greenwood AC) W DQ 7
    Aug 20 Tim Callahan Brooklyn, NY (Pelican AC) D PTS 20
    Sep 15 Eugene Garcia Brooklyn, NY (Greenwood AC) W KO 5 (1:30)
    Oct 1 Harry Forbes Brooklyn, NY (Pelican AC) W KO 15
    Nov 19 Tim Callahan Brooklyn, NY (Greenwood AC) W KO 10
    Nov 26 Paddy Donovan Philadelphia, PA (Nonpareil AC) W KO 3
    Dec 17 Jimmy Rose Brooklyn, NY (Greenwood AC) W KO 2
    Dec 31 Austin Rice Brooklyn, NY (Pelican AC) W TKO 14

    1899
    Jan 30 Casper Leon Brooklyn, NY (Greenwood AC) W KO 12
    Feb 18 Fred Snyder Philadelphia, PA (Nonpareil AC) W NWS 6
    Mar 14 Patsy Haley New York, NY (Lenox AC) W KO 18 (0:48)
    Apr 28 Joe Bernstein New York, NY (Broadway AC) W PTS 25
    May 26 Sammy Kelly New York, NY (Broadway AC) W KO 5
    Jun 8 Billy Barrett New York, NY (Broadway AC) W KO 10
    Jul 1 Johnny Ritchie Tuckahoe, NY (Westchester AC) W KO 3
    Sep 12 Thomas "Pedlar" Palmer Tuckahoe, NY (Westchester AC) W KO 1 (2:32)
    --Bantamweight Championship of the World.
    Sep 29 Fred Snyder Philadelphia, PA (Industrial Hall AC) W TKO 3
    Oct 9 Billy Rotchford Chicago, IL (Tattersall’s AA) W KO 1
    Nov 18 Patsy Haley Chicago, IL (Tattersall’s AA) W KO 1 (1:40)
    Nov 18 “Turkey Point” Bill Smith Chicago, IL (Tattersall’s AA) W KO 3 (1:00)
    Nov 30 Eddie Sprague Hartford, CT (Nutmeg State AC) W KO 2
    Dec 12 James J. Corbett, Jr. Chicago, IL (Trocadero) W KO 2
    Dec 18 Charlie Mason Cincinnati, OH (People’s AC) W KO 2
    Dec 18 Freckles O'Brien Cincinnati, OH (People’s AC) W KO 1
    Dec 22 Harry Forbes New York, NY (Broadway AC) W TKO 2 (1:33)

    1900
    Jan 9 George Dixon New York, NY (Broadway AC) W TKO 8
    --Featherweight Championship of the World.
    Jan 29 Jack Ward Baltimore, MD (Eureka AC) W KO 1 (2:05)
    Feb 1 Eddie Santry Chicago, IL (Tattersall’s AA) W KO 5
    --Featherweight Championship of the World.
    Mar 9 Oscar Gardner New York, NY (Broadway AC) W KO 3
    --Featherweight Championship of the World; Weights: 123 - 123 ˝.
    Mar 15 Eddie Lenny Philadelphia, PA (Industrial Hall AC) W TKO 2 (1:45)
    Apr 17 Tommy White Chicago, IL (Tattersall’s AA) D PTS 6
    Apr 20 Tommy Warren New York, NY (Broadway AC) W TKO 1
    May 21 Elwood McCloskey Philadelphia, PA (Penn Art AC) W NWS 6
    Jun 12 Tommy White Brooklyn, NY (Seaside AC) W KO 3
    --Featherweight Championship of the World.
    Jun 23 George Dixon Chicago, IL (Tattersall’s AA) W PTS 6
    Jul 16 Frank Erne New York, NY (Madison Square Garden) W TKO 3
    Nov 2 Joe Bernstein Louisville, KY (Nonpareil AC) W KO 7 (2:05)
    --Featherweight Championship of the World.
    Nov 13 Kid Broad Chicago, IL (Tattersall’s AA) W PTS 6
    Dec 13 Joe Gans Chicago, IL (Tattersall’s AA) W KO 2 (2:05)

    1901
    Apr 30 Oscar Gardner San Francisco, CA (Mechanic’s Pavilion) W KO 4
    --Featherweight Championship of the World.
    May 29 Aurelio Herrera San Francisco, CA (Mechanic’s Pavilion) W KO 4
    --Featherweight Championship of the World.
    Nov 28 Young Corbett II Hartford, CT (Nutmeg AC) L KO 2 (1:44)
    --Featherweight Championship of the World; Corbett weighed 126 lbs.

    1902
    Feb 22 Dave Sullivan Louisville, KY (Southern AC) W TKO 15
    --Some sources report this bout as a Lightweight Championship of the World contest.

    1903
    Feb 6 Joe Bernstein Philadelphia, PA (Industrial Hall AC) W NWS 6
    Feb 25 Billy Maynard Philadelphia, PA (Penn Art AC) W KO 4
    Mar 31 Young Corbett II San Francisco, CA (Mechanic’s Pavilion) L KO 11
    --Featherweight Championship of the World.
    Sep 26 Lew Ryall Philadelphia, PA (National AC) W NWS 6
    Oct 3 Billy Willis Philadelphia, PA (National AC) W NWS 6
    Oct 20 Jimmy Briggs Boston, MA (Criterion AC) W PTS 15
    Dec 19 Billy Willis Philadelphia, PA (National AC) W NWS 6

    1904
    Jan 1 Leo “Yock” Henninger Allentown, PA W KO 2
    Apr 10 George Barton St. Paul, MN L PTS 6
    Oct 10 Eddie Hanlon Philadelphia, PA (Industrial Hall) W TKO 4

    1905
    Oct 18 "Harlem" Tommy Murphy Philadelphia, PA (National AC) W TKO 1 (2:02)

    1906
    Mar 14 Oscar "Battling" Nelson Philadelphia, PA (National AC) L NWS 6
    May 28 Jimmy Britt New York, NY (Madison Square Garden) W NWS 10
    Oct 17 Young Corbett II Philadelphia, PA (National AC) W NWS 6

    1908
    May 16 Young Loughrey Philadelphia, PA (National AC) L NWS 6
    May 26 Frank "Spike" Robson New York, NY (National AC) D NWS 6




    Career Summary

    Year TB W L D KO ND NC
    1897 15 12 1 2 2 0 0
    1898 14 11 1 2 8 0 0
    1899 17 17 0 0 15 0 0
    1900 14 13 0 1 10 0 0
    1901 5 4 1 0 3 0 0
    1902 1 1 0 0 1 0 0
    1903 7 6 1 0 1 0 0
    1904 3 2 1 0 2 0 0
    1905 1 1 0 0 1 0 0
    1906 3 2 1 0 0 0 0
    1907 Did Not Fight
    1908 2 0 1 1 0 0 0
    12 Years 82 69 7 6 43 0 0



    Fight Notes


    1897
    Apr 3 vs. Jack Snee: The bout took place in Brooklyn, NY at the Greenwood AC. Snee is listed by some sources as “Jack Shea.” The agreed weight was to be 110 lbs for both fighters. The result was not a “KO 1” for Terry as was sometimes listed in various sources. McGovern had the better of the match up until the fourth round when his temper got the best of him, as it would on a couple of other occasions later on in his career. Fouling was frequent in the fourth round with McGovern being the chief offender, which resulted in the referee stopping the bout and awarding Snee the win on disqualification. McGovern was well ahead when the ref stopped the bout. Brooklyn Daily Eagle
    Apr 17 vs. Frank Barnes: The bout took place in Brooklyn, NY at the Greenwood AC. The weight was set for 112 pounds, but Barnes came in over weight and lost his forfeit as a result, but the fight went on. The bout was pretty much even for the first seven rounds, but during the remaining three McGovern pulled ahead on points and in the tenth and final round Terry repeatedly jabbed the stuffing’s out of Barnes without anything in return. Police News
    May 3 vs. Eddie Avery: The bout took place in New York, NY at the Polo AC. Avery had a record of 9-3-1 (9 KO) in 14 total bouts coming into this bout and at one point during his career he held the Bantamweight Championship of America. The New York World states that this was an amateur bout, but being that both me had been fighting pro for a good while, especially Avery, then it had to be a professional bout. This bout was part of a big amateur boxing tournament held at the Polo AC. Both McGovern and Eddie Avery were boxers in the 112 lb class and two of six fighters competing at that weight. No description of the result was given the next day, but these were all amateur fights. W PTS 4 NYW
    May 22 vs. Kid Dougherty: The bout took place in Brooklyn, NY at the Greenwood AC. W PTS 10 BDE
    --Weight: 112 lbs. They furnished one of the best exhibitions seen at the club for some time.
    Jun 7 vs. Tom McDermott: The bout took place in Brooklyn, NY at the Greenpoint AC. The fight was scheduled for ten rounds at 112 pounds. McGovern controlled the fight from start to finish controlling McDermott’s rushing tactics by sticking out his left jab over and over and in the end Terry received the decision. Brooklyn Daily Eagle
    Jun 19 vs. “Brooklyn” Tommy Sullivan: The bout took place in Brooklyn, NY at the Greenwood AC. Sullivan had a record of 7-0-1 (6 KO) going into the bout. Scheduled for ten rounds at 112 pounds McGovern and Sullivan went at one another at a fast and exciting pace and did everything except bite each other for ten rounds without a let-up. In the end the referee declared the fight a draw. Brooklyn Daily Eagle
    Aug 16 vs. Eddie Goodbody: The bout took place in Brooklyn, NY at the Greenwood AC. This was the first of two bouts versus Goodbody and it was scheduled for ten rounds at 112 pounds. Terry was the aggressor for the first few rounds using his left jab in a very clever style. The middle rounds were fairly even. During the last two rounds McGovern worked his jab hard, but Goodbody fought gamely to last out the ten rounds after which the referee named McGovern the victor. Brooklyn Daily Eagle
    Aug 23 vs. Billy Barrett: The bout took place in Brooklyn, NY at the Greenpoint SC. W PTS 10 BDE
    --Going into the bout, Barrett had a record of 4-1-7 (1 KO) in 12 recorded bouts.
    Sep 18 vs. Jack Leon: The bout took place in Brooklyn, NY at the Greenwood AC. Another bout scheduled for ten rounds at 112 pounds. Terry opened up more in this bout as he started using his right hand with telling effect. The first couple of rounds were even as both men landed effectively and often on one another. A right hook to the jaw staggered Leon in the third round and throughout the next two rounds Terry kept up a good pace landing his right to the body and head. Leon landed well in the sixth round, but it was rather short-lived and McGovern came out in the seventh round with intentions of adding the first knockout to his record. Terry drove Leon all over the ring with hard right hands to the body and head landing so effectively that the referee halted the action to save Leon from being completely knocked out. With the win came McGovern’s first stoppage victory and also pretty much the beginning of the style of fighting that not only won him scores of fans, but also a style of fighting that struck fear and terror in the hearts of his opponents! Brooklyn Daily Eagle
    Oct 2 vs. Jack Reagan: The bout took place in Brooklyn, NY at the Greenwood AC. W TKO 6 --
    Oct 9 vs. Jack Doyle: The bout took place in Brooklyn, NY at the Greenwood AC. Police stopped the bout in the seventh round and McGovern was awarded the decision, so was it a “TKO 7,” or “W TD 7.” Brooklyn Daily Eagle
    Oct 23 vs. Eddie Goodbody: The bout took place in Brooklyn, NY at the Greenwood AC. Bout was scheduled for ten rounds at 112 lbs. Police stopped the bout due to a prior bout where a boxer was seriously injured and looked as though he would die! Brooklyn Daily Eagle D PTS 4 BDE
    Nov 13 vs. Harry Peterson: The bout took place in New York, NY at the Polo AC. W PTS 6 --
    Dec 18 vs. Charles Roden: The bout took place in New York, NY at the Polo AC. W PTS 6 BDE
    --BDE lists “Jerry McGovern.” Wt: 112 lbs.
    Dec 31 vs. Jimmy Kelly: This bout took place in Brooklyn, NY at the National AC. A right uppercut put Kelly down and out. Some sources list “Jack Kelly.” Brooklyn Daily Eagle W KO 2 BDE

    1898
    Feb 25 vs. Billy Maynard: This bout took place in Yonkers, NY. W PTS 8 --
    Mar 12 vs. Pinkey Evans: This bout took place in Yonkers, NY. W PTS 8 --
    Apr 15 vs. Fred Mayo: The bout took place in Waterbury, CT at Jacques’ Auditorium. Attendance: 1,500 (est) Scheduled for ten rounds at 112 lbs. Naugatuck Daily News
    May 5 vs. George Monroe: This bout took place in Yonkers, NY. The weight of both men scaled less than 112 pounds each. It was an excellent bout from the sound of the first gong until referee Edwards declared it a draw. Terry was the aggressor for most of the bout, but George was always ready to counter the attack. There were no knockdowns, but each man suffered eye cuts and they fought one another to a standstill and were punching out of clinches. Terry was just beginning to fall into the rushing style that would make him so popular and at times, just when the audience thought that McGovern was on the verge of knocking his man out, Monroe always came back with a viscous counter. Unknown Newspaper Clip
    Jun 11 vs. George Munroe: The bout took place in Brooklyn, NY at the Greater New York Athletic Club. The men weighed in at 112 pounds. Both looked fit to go the entire twenty-five rounds that was scheduled. The first round was a “feeling out” round in which no damaging blows were landed by either fighter. Monroe did most of the leading in the second, but was dropped for a count in the third. McGovern started fast in the fourth and did all of the leading and the fifth round was more of the same. McGovern was cautioned twice for using his head in close. In the sixth round, McGovern cut loose knocking his opponent all over the ring and by the end of the seventh it looked as though it would only be a matter of time until Monroe was knocked out. Monroe managed to gain a little measure on McGovern in the ninth and tenth rounds. Up to the thirteenth neither man had landed any real damaging blows. McGovern again cut loose in the fourteenth hitting hard and drawing blood for the first time in the fight. Monroe was weak at the end of the fifteenth and betting was 3 to 1 that he would not last two more rounds, but Monroe regained his energy and probably had the better of the mill in the two rounds that were supposed to be his last. The fight was nearly even at the end of twenty rounds. Monroe was downed again in the twenty-second round, but still managed to land as much as he took. The twenty-third was even, but in the twenty-fourth McGovern began to land often and land hard. Terry landed a hard shot and followed it up with another hard punch which sent Monroe down for the count, the result “KO 24.” Brooklyn Daily Eagle
    Jul 23 vs. Tim Callahan: This bout took place in Brooklyn, NY at the Pelican AC. George Monroe was the scheduled opponent for Terry, but when turned out to be a no-show , Callahan was substituted and he came into the bout with a record of 7-1-3 (0 KO). Scheduled for twenty-five rounds at 114 pounds, McGovern lost his head fouling Callahan on three times in which he was warned by referee Herald each time, mostly for hitting in the clinches. In the tenth round, Terry repeated the offense and although Callahan was very much the worse for the wear and taking a steady beating he was immediately named the winner by disqualification. Brooklyn Daily Eagle
    Aug 4 vs. George Monroe: The bout took place in Brooklyn, NY at the Greenwood AC. The bout was scheduled for twenty rounds with Gus Pevereley acting as referee. Monroe objected to the fact that Pevereley, who was the official referee of the club, was named referee for the bout stating that Pevereley would naturally be inclined to be bias toward McGovern since Terry was a South Brooklyn boy. After a lengthy argument, Monroe agreed to go on with Pevereley acting as referee, but stipulating that the first man to hit on the break, or hit in a clinch after being ordered to do that person be immediately disqualified. As it turned out it was Monroe who broke the rule first, twice in the early rounds, but Terry did not want the win in that fashion and he generously allowed the infractions to pass unnoticed. Monroe was warned to keep his head but after receiving a blow to the wind that sorely distressed him and which he claimed to be a foul blow, Monroe rushed into a clinch and continued to hit after being ordered to break and as a result referee Pevereley had no other choice but to disqualify Monroe, so McGovern got the win by a seventh round disqualification. Brooklyn Daily Eagle
    Aug 20 vs. Tim Callahan: This bout took place in Brooklyn, NY at the Pelican AC. Callahan’s record was 8-1-3 (0 KO). The bout was scheduled for twenty rounds at 115 pounds and twenty rounds it went with the end result being a draw. Brooklyn Daily Eagle
    Sep 15 vs. Eugene Garcia: The bout took place in Brooklyn, NY at the Greenwood AC. The bout was scheduled for fifteen rounds at catch weights. At the beginning of the second round, Terry rushed his opponent, but Garcia easily side-stepped and Terry went through the ropes, but he was up and back in immediately and went to work landing lefts and rights to the body and head. Terry used his left jab very effectively in the third round, which started to make some openings for his power shots. Garcia landed a hard right uppercut to McGovern’s mouth, but with little, or no effect and Terry tore into Garcia battering him all around the ring during the fourth round again landing lefts and rights to both the body and head. After 1:30 of fighting in the fifth round, Terry let fly a right hook that found its mark and dropped Garcia in his tracks putting him down and out by knockout in the fifth round. Brooklyn Daily Eagle
    Oct 1 vs. Harry Forbes: This bout took place in Brooklyn, NY at the Pelican AC. Scheduled for twenty-five rounds, Forbes had a record of 17-2-4 (8 KO) coming into the fight. W KO 15 BDE
    Nov 19 vs. Tim Callahan: The bout took place in Brooklyn, NY at the Greenwood AC. Callahan’s record was 9-1-5 (0 KO). W KO 10 BDE
    Nov 26 vs. Paddy Donovan: This bout took place in Philadelphia, PA at the Nonpareil AC. W KO 3 PN
    Dec 17 vs. Jimmy Rose: The bout took place in Brooklyn, NY at the Greenwood AC. W KO 2 BDE
    Dec 31 vs. Austin Rice: This bout took place in Brooklyn, NY at the Pelican AC. W TKO 14 BDE

    1899
    Jan 30 vs. Casper Leon: The bout took place in Brooklyn, NY at the Greenwood AC. The fight was scheduled for twenty-five rounds at 115 pounds. McGovern was a favorite at 100 to 80 in the betting. Charley White, Leon’s manager stated afterward that Terry broke two of Leon’s ribs in the second round. The rules governing the bout were straight Queensberry with no hitting in the clinches, or breakaway which should have played greatly in favor of Leon as McGovern was very much an inside fighter. In Casper Leon Terry was suppose to be meeting the toughest challenge of his short career as Leon was one of the top fighters of his size in the world, but McGovern handled him as if he were a novice just starting out and Terry scored a clean knockout in the twelfth round. The club was packed with probably its largest crowd ever up to that point in time. Leon was known for his cleverness, but as it turned out his cleverness was no match for the ring generalship and McGovern’s ability to severely punish and opponent. McGovern had a slight lead going after five rounds, but it was becoming evident that it would really only be a matter of time before Leon fell. Throughout the remaining rounds Terry put in some terrific work to the head and body and his right hand was doing particular damage whenever it landed as Terry put all of his force into each blow and the shots to the body had a very telling effect on Leon as he was visibly weakening by the constant attack put forth by McGovern. In the twelfth round both men came out and swapped some quick punches, but Terry’s was much more powerful and on a quick counter, McGovern shot over a short left that landed flush on the point of Leon’s chin and down he went as if he had been shot. Referee, Owen Ziegler counted Leon out with only a few seconds remaining in the round. It took several minutes for Casper to fully recover his senses. Former world champion and human dynamo Jimmy Barry was only able to knockout Casper Leon once in 28 rounds, and failed in other return bouts to do the trick. Brooklyn Daily Eagle & The National Police Gazette
    Feb 18 vs. Fred Snyder: This bout took place in Philadelphia, PA at the Nonpareil AC. W NWS 6 PI
    Mar 14 vs. Patsy Haley: This bout took place in New York, NY at the Lenox AC. Scheduled for twenty-five rounds at 116 pounds the bout was to determine who would face European Bantamweight Champion Pedlar Palmer in order to have a World Bantamweight Champion. This was the first of two bouts that these two would go at it. Haley was one of the most formidable opponents Terry had faced and the cleverness at which Patsy fought surpassed any other boxer Terry had yet met in the ring, but McGovern rose to the occasion and took Haley out in eighteen rounds, a feat that Oscar Gardner could not do in twenty rounds and one that Dave Sullivan took twenty-three rounds of the hardest kind of fighting to do. Going into the bout Patsy stated that he was in the absolute best shape of his life and the same could be said of McGovern. Haley put forth a good effort in which his clever footwork saved him several times, but in the end the consistent whirlwind attack to the body and head that McGovern administered to his foe was just too much for Patsy to handle. Terry finished the bout looking as fresh as when he started without a scratch on his face and he fought a very fair fight throughout. Every time that he put Haley on the floor Terry stood back until he could regain his feet. The action was lively. But Haley’s punches lacked the steam that those of McGovern carried. In the fourth round a hard right uppercut dropped Haley on his back for a count of seven and as soon as he was upright a viscous right cross dropped him for and eight count and once more in the fourth another right put Haley down for the third time, the last of which Haley was down for a nine count. Amazingly, Haley was fresh for the next few rounds despite the beating he was taking and he would often land some hard shots of his own, but to no effect on Terry. In the fifteenth round McGovern sent his man to one knee after landing a hard combination and Haley was down for another nine count. Again in round seventeen Haley found himself on the floor after Terry had landed a hard straight right and in round eighteen after forcing Haley to the ropes a brutal right cross put Haley down and out at 0:48 of the eighteenth round. It was a clean knockout and Haley had to be carried back to his corner. Referee was Charlie White. Brooklyn Eagle & Police Gazette
    Apr 28 vs. Joe Bernstein: This bout took place in New York, NY at the Broadway AC. Scheduled for twenty-five rounds at 125 pounds. Terry was a 2 to 1 favorite going into the bout. Bernstein weighed in at 124 pounds and McGovern was 119 pounds. This was McGovern’s debut at the featherweight limit and not only did he win, but he also showed skill that he was not known to possess. The crowd was one of the largest ever up to that point in time to be put on at the Broadway AC. The fight was the best scrap since the club had reopened. Up until this bout, Terry had been viewed primarily as a slugger with little science and cleverness, but against Bernstein he showed that he not only could brawl and slug, but that he was in deed a very clever fighter with considerable skill. Terry had a solid defense throughout, but it was his offense that brought out the crowd. Bernstein used a very good defense as well and by keeping his guard up Terry was forced to work the body, which he did very, very well. Joe seemed to better at infighting, but he was still outmatched by the “Brooklyn Wonder.” Terry was the aggressor throughout and was extremely effective working the body of his opponent, while Bernstein was relegated to cover and counter punch to keep from absorbing the solid whacks that McGovern was capable of landing to the head. Although the bout was a very hard fought battle between the two the only blood that was spilled was a slight trinkle of crimson from the nose of Bernstein. At the end of the bout the referee, Johnny White, awarded McGovern the decision on points which was applauded by the crowd. Bernstein was down twice from the hard shots of McGovern, but he managed to last out the match. McGovern winner by decision after twenty-five rounds. Brooklyn Eagle and Police Gazette
    May 26 vs. Sammy Kelly: This bout took place in New York, NY at the Broadway AC. Kelly came out fresh in the fifth round, feinted, then led, but missed, and like a flash McGovern was in, first with a left hook to the stomach, then a right to the jaw, and Kelly staggered. McGovern planted another, then a hard right jolt on the jaw, and Kelly went down like a log. He made a feeble effort to rise, but was counted out. New York Times W KO 5 BDE
    Jun 8 vs. Billy Barrett: This bout took place in New York, NY at the Broadway AC. Barrett came into this bout with a record of 16-4-10 (6 KO) in 30 total bouts. W KO 10 BDE
    Jul 1 vs. Johnny Ritchie: This bout took place in Tuckahoe, NY at the Westchester AC. The fight was to be fought at 118 pounds for a purse of $2000; $1500 to the winner and $500 to the loser. Scheduled for twenty-five rounds with clean breaking and no hitting in the clinches were the stipulations of the bout. The fight was to decide the Bantamweight Champion of America and the winner would face Pedlar Palmer for World recognition as Bantamweight Champion. Jimmy Carroll was referee. A left hook to the point of the chin put Ritchie down and out in the third round. Brooklyn Daily Eagle
    Sep 12 vs. Thomas "Pedlar" Palmer: Bantamweight Championship of the World. This bout took place in Tuckahoe, NY at the Westchester AC. Weights: 115 ˝, 113 ˝. Time: 2:32. Palmer came into the bout undefeated with a record of 27-0-1 (4 KO). KO 1 BDE
    Sep 29 vs. Fred Snyder: This bout took place in Philadelphia, PA at the Industrial Hall AC. WTKO 3 PI
    --Snyder was down twice in the first and six times in the second after which the police stopped the bout.
    Oct 9 vs. Billy Rotchford: This bout took place in Chicago, IL at Tattersall’s AA. McGovern went after Rotchford much the same way as he attacked Palmer in September and the result was a quick ending of around a minute. W KO 1 BDE
    Nov 18 vs. Patsy Haley: This bout took place in Chicago, IL at Tattersall’s AA. WKO 1 BDE
    --Time: 1:40
    Nov 18 vs. “Turkey Point” Bill Smith: This bout took place in Chicago, IL at Tattersall’s AA. WKO 3 BDE
    --Time: 1:00
    Nov 30 vs. Eddie Sprague: This bout took place in Hartford, CT at the Nutmeg State AC. It took less than a minute of the second round for Terry to put an end to matters. Sprague was down three times in the first round. He was down once in the second in which he was counted out. W KO 2 PG/DD
    Dec 12 vs. James J. Corbett, Jr: This bout took place in Chicago, IL at Tattersall’s AA. WKO 2 --
    Dec 18 vs. Charlie Mason: This bout took place in Cincinnati, OH at the People’s AC. WKO 2 BDE
    Dec 18 vs. Freckles O'Brien: This bout took place in Cincinnati, OH at the People’s AC. WKO 1 BDE
    Dec 22 vs. Harry Forbes: This bout took place in New York, NY at the Broadway AC. Forbes came into the bout with a record of 35-3-12 (11 KO). --Time: 1:33 W TKO 2 BDE

    1900
    Jan 9 vs. George Dixon: This bout took place in New York, NY at the Broadway AC for the Featherweight Championship of the World. Dixon had a record of 51-5-22 (30 KO) coming in.W TKO 8 BDE
    Jan 29 vs. Jack Ward: This bout took place in Baltimore, MD at the North Avenue Rink (Eureka AC). Ward was never given much thought of winning, but he was a decent and fairly clever opponent for Terry to show his wares against and he was expected to give Terry a few rounds of work, but that was not the case. Ward was outclassed and overwhelmed right from the get-go and was dropped for the ten count in rather quick fashion. One observer stated that the bout looked like a Topy Spaniel against a Bull Terrier. McGovern was just superior in every area and at the sound of the gong he went straight after Ward. Ward tried to fight back, but Terry was invincible to any counter shots as he bombed Ward into a corner and into submission. After landing some hard body shots Terry sent over a right that was very compact, but very powerful and Ward went down and out until referee Al Herford reached the count of ten. The time was two minutes and five seconds of the first round. Police Gazette
    Feb 1 vs. Eddie Santry: The bout took place in Chicago, IL at Tattersall’s AA. For the Featherweight Championship of the World. Santry’s clever defensive work bothered Terry for a couple of rounds, but once he settled in it was only a matter of time. Santry had claimed his stake to the World Featherweight Title (122 lbs) by virtue of his knockout victory over Ben Jordan of England. Referee: George Siler. Santry was down once in the second and again in the fourth. Santry tried to keep his distance in the fifth, but when he realized that it was impossible Eddie bravely made a stand, which would turn out to be a mistake as Terry thrived on that type of fighting. Both were swinging wildly when a McGovern uppercut stopped Santry in his tracks and caused him to drop his guard and Terry instantly seized the opportunity and dropped a left to the jaw followed by a right to the ear as Santry was falling. Eddie fell face first and rolled over. At the count of nine Santry got to his knees and tried to straighten himself up, but was unable to do so and referee Siler gave the bout to McGovern by knockout in five. McGovern did not have a mark on him when he left the ring. Cripple Creek Morning Times. I have a great write-up from the Chicago Tribune by George Siler, who referee’d the fight.
    Mar 9 vs. Oscar Gardner: This bout took place in New York, NY at the Broadway AC. WKO 3 BDE
    --Featherweight Championship of the World; Weights: 123 - 123 ˝. Referee: Johnny White. A left to the jaw put Terry down in the first round, but McGovern rose with a vengeance and his attack on Gardner was of cyclonic proportions. Gardner went down three times, each time almost taking the count. A left hook to the neck put Oscar down and out.
    Mar 15 vs. Eddie Lenny: This bout took place in Philadelphia, PA at the Industrial Hall AC. Lenny was much better than his 15-8-25 (6 KO) would suggest. Time: 1:45. WTKO 2 PN
    Apr 17 vs. Tommy White: This bout took place in Chicago, IL at Tattersall’s AA. WPTS 6 BDE
    --Att: 12,000. White was mainly on the defensive while Terry was the aggressor throughout.
    Apr 20 vs. Tommy Warren: This bout took place in New York, NY at the Broadway AC. When the match was made, Sam Harris, the champion's manager, did not know anything about Warren, or the bout never would have taken place. When Harris did learn about him he tried to have the match declared off, but the club insisted that he carry out his contract. At 8:30 o'clock last evening he again asked that it be canceled, but had to live up to the articles. Warren, who is about 45 years old, weighed fully 140 pounds, but did not look to be in any kind of shape and came into the bout with a record of 48-9-5 (31 KO). Terry was afraid to hit him hard and only tapped him lightly. Twice Warren went down from right hand swings and he was weak when the round closed. The crowd began hooting when they saw what Warren really was and the club officials decided to call it off. Brooklyn Daily Eagle W TKO 1
    May 21 vs. Elwood McCloskey: This bout took place in Philadelphia, PA at the Penn Art AC. W NWS 6BDE
    Jun 12 vs. Tommy White: This bout took place in Brooklyn, NY at the Seaside AC. WKO 3 BDE
    --Featherweight Championship of the World. White was down seven times in the third and final round.
    Jun 23 vs. George Dixon: This bout took place in Chicago, IL at Tattersall’s AA. Dixon’s record prior to entering the ring was 51-6-23 (30 KO). W PTS 6 BDE
    Jul 16 vs. Frank Erne: This bout took place in New York, NY at Madison Square Garden. Erne had a record of 28-2-12 (13 KO) prior to the contest. Attendance: 14,000 (est). Erne was certainly the more clever of the two, but McGovern’s onslaught was so fierce, as it always is, that Erne could not hold him off. Erne, the World Lightweight Champion, had agreed to to get down to 128, which is five pounds below the lightweight limit for the bout. McGovern was sent to his knees in the first round after Erne landed a straight left to the chin, but Terry was up and on the attack again. In the third round a fusillade of punches to the body and head put Erne down for a nine count and he was a mask of crimson as he gallantly reached his feet. McGovern met him with another volley of punches and for a short time Erne tried to mix it with Terry, but McGovern’s attack was too fierce and Erne sank to the canvas. Courageously Erne was up again before the ten-count was tolled, but he was visibly in very bad shape and as Terry stalked and measured his opponent Frank’s seconds threw in the sponge signaling that McGovern was Erne’s master by technical knockout in three rounds. It was probably McGovern’s greatest performance and with it came Terry’s third knockout of current world champions all within nine months time; bantamweight, featherweight and lightweight world champions all fell under the furious onslaught that was Terry McGovern in the ring!
    Nov 2 vs. Joe Bernstein: This bout took place in Louisville, KY at the Nonpareil AC. (2:05)WKO 7 BDE
    --Featherweight Championship of the World.
    Nov 13 vs. Kid Broad: This bout took place in Chicago, IL at Tattersall’s AA. W PTS 6 BDE
    Dec 13 vs. Joe Gans: This bout took place in Chicago, IL at Tattersall’s AA. McGovern-124, Gans-133. Gans entered the ring sporting a record of 73-4-7 (52 KO). An article in the Durango Democrat of Colorado stated that McGovern was now the undisputed World Lightweight Champion. The bout itself was a “fake” on Gans part as he laid down, but it was evident that Terry was not in on the fix and went about fighting in his usual manner while Gans put forth a terrible display. Referee: George Siler. Time: 2:05 W KO 2 BDE

    1901
    Apr 30 vs. Oscar Gardner: This bout took place in San Francisco, CA at Mechanic’s Pavilion. WKO 4BDE
    --Featherweight Championship of the World. Gardner went down repeatedly from Terry’s attack.
    May 29 vs. Aurelio Herrera: This bout took place in San Francisco, CA at Mechanic’s Pavilion. Featherweight Championship of the World. Herrera stepped into the ring undefeated with a record of 20-0-3 (20 KO).
    W KO 4 TT
    Nov 28 vs. Young Corbett II: This bout took place in Hartford, CT at the Nutmeg AC. Corbett had a record of 32-4-7 (26 KO) going into the fight. (1:44) L KO 2 BDE
    --Featherweight Championship of the World; Corbett weighed 126 lbs.

    1902
    Feb 22 vs. Dave Sullivan: This bout took place in Louisville, KY at the Southern AC. Sullivan carried a record of 23-8-16 (17 KO) into the bout. Some sources report this bout as a Lightweight Championship of the World contest. After fifteen grueling rounds in one of the best fights that was ever witnessed in Louisville, “Terrible” Terry came out on top with a technical knockout. It was not one of the whirlwind victories that has made Terry such an instant success, but instead a battle of attrition and one of the most difficult struggles of McGovern’s career in the ring. For the first ten rounds the battle was about as even as it could get with both men fighting furiously. Terry took over in the tenth round and in the eleventh round he floored Sullivan and upon rising it was evident that it was know only a matter of time before McGovern slipped his special brand of sleeping potion over to Sullivan. Sullivan was exhausted as the twelfth round started and from then on he was mainly in a defensive survival mode, but McGovern would not be denied that which he loved most…a knockout! Making a final stand Sullivan put together a nice little rally in the fourteenth round, but by the end of the round McGovern’s attack had Sullivan clinching for dear life as Terry blasted lefts and rights to his opponents head and body. Sullivan, game to the core, started another rally in the fifteenth round, but he was down quickly. Sullivan was not out cold, but as he rose before the fatal ten count McGovern came at him like the beast he was and Dave just sank back down to the canvas at which time referee, Bob Fitzsimmons, wisely called a halt and awarded the win to McGovern. Brooklyn Daily Eagle

    1903
    Feb 6 vs. Joe Bernstein: This bout took place in Philadelphia, PA at the Industrial Hall AC. After a year out of the ring, McGovern returned to the ring wars to face an old rival in Joe Bernstein this being their third bout against one another; Terry won the previous two, the last by knockout. Industrial Hall was packed long before the main bout came on. At no point during the bout did Bernstein have an advantage and although he finished on his feet through six rounds McGovern gave Bernstein considerable punishment and beat him decisively. Joe did land some hard shots on occasion, but he always took a drubbing in return. Terry did most of his work to the body and it was evident that the “old power” still lingered in McGovern’s lethal fists and had any of the vicious body blows landed to Bernstein’s head he would have surely took a nap on the canvas. Joe was down for a nine-count in the fifth round, but Terry was unable to put him away as Bernstein still possessed the heart of a winner although he lost. Not being able to put Bernstein away also may have been because of McGovern’s lengthy hiatus out of the ring, but Terry was in splendid condition physically and he fought fast throughout all six rounds and looked as though he could have went several more rounds had the occasion called for it. Philadelphia Evening Bulletin
    Feb 25 vs. Billy Maynard: This bout took place in Philadelphia, PA at the Penn Art AC. W KO 4 PEB
    Mar 31 vs. Young Corbett II: Featherweight Championship of the World. This bout took place in San Francisco, CA at Mechanic’s Pavilion. Corbett entered the ring with a record of 39-4-8 (30 KO). At 8:30 P.M. the betting was 10 to 9 in favor of McGovern. The fight was fast and neither man showed a bit of idleness. Corbett had a shade in nearly every round and when he stunned Terry in the eleventh round, Corbett seized the moment and went after Terry without letting up until McGovern sank to the floor a battered and beaten man! Terry was down for a seven-count in the first round and again in the second. George Harding was timekeeper and he stated that the blows that put Terry out were left and right swings to the head followed by a right uppercut to the chin. The big amphitheatre was packed with an estimated 11,000 screaming fans, which was the largest crowd to ever witness a bout in San Francisco at that point in time. Corbett was attended by Alex Greggains, Tim McGraw, Billy Otts and Harry Tuthill. McGovern was accompanied by Sam Harris, Charlie Mayhood, Eddie Cain and Joe Angelo. Ed Graney was referee. Corbett came in at 127 and McGovern was several pounds under the required weight. Both me were in excellent condition and gave it their all until Corbett was declared the victor in round eleven! Daily Kennebec Journal
    Sep 26 vs. Lew Ryall: This bout took place in Philadelphia, PA at the National AC. W NWS 6 DDR
    Oct 3 vs. Billy Willis: This bout took place in Philadelphia, PA at the National AC. Willis was game and although he was greatly overmatched he gave McGovern six tough rounds. Terry fought like the “Terry of old,” as he lit into his opponent in whirlwind fashion, but he was met head on by the scrappy Willis. Only once did Billy try to stall. It was in the fourth round after McGovern had landed a brutal right hand to the body and Willis, who was visibly weakened by the blow, did not hesitate to save himself by holding on. With that one exception, Willis met and fought McGovern every inch of the way. Willis put up the fight of his life, but McGovern was master of the bout in all six rounds. Willis came into the bout with a record of 36-6-18 (10 KO) in 61 total bouts. Milwaukee Free Press
    Oct 20 vs. Jimmy Briggs: This bout took place in Boston, MA. For the first ten rounds it seemed as though McGovern had lost the “it” that he use to possess and a favorable decision in his favor was greatly in doubt. However, through great ring generalship Terry had his opponent at his mercy by the time the bout ended as he dealt out some terrible punishment upon his foe, but Terry never could land the homerun punch. During the last two rounds, McGovern landed around twenty shots that he put every ounce of his strength into. Briggs took it well, but he was a well-beaten fighter by this time. Briggs was overly game, but over matched. The men were teeing off at one another when the bell rang ending the fight. ***
    --Briggs came into the bout with a record of 47-11-20 (18 KO) in 78 total bouts.
    Dec 19 vs. Billy Willis: This bout took place in Philadelphia, PA at the National AC. W NWS 6 PR
    --Willis came into this bout with a record of 42-7-18 (9 KO) in 68 total bouts. A right to the jaw dropped Willis in the second round.

    1904
    Jan 1 vs. Leo Henninger: The bout took place in Allentown, PA. A right to the body ended the fight. Henninger was several pounds heavier than Terry and from the very beginning of the first round Leo tried to use it to his advantage. Time and again Henninger went straight at McGovern, which was met with hard shots to the stomach and head and by rounds end Henninger was ducking, dodging and holding on for survival. McGovern came out with a vengeance and a snarl in the second and was on top of Henninger before he could get his hands up. A feint to the body gave Terry the opening he was looking for and viscous right cross to the chin dropped Henninger for a nine count. As he staggered to his feet Leo was met with a savage barrage of punches and was soon hung over the ropes by a quick one-two punch. As Henninger bounced off the ropes Terry had him measured and cut loose a long right which crashed home with telling effect and McGovern watched as his opponent was counted out in the second round. Police Gazette
    Apr 10 vs. George Barton: The bout took place in St. Paul, MN. L PTS 6 --
    Oct 10 vs. Eddie Hanlon: This bout took place in Philadelphia, PA at the Industrial Hall AC. WTKO 4 PR

    1905
    Oct 18 vs. "Harlem" Tommy Murphy: This bout took place in Philadelphia, PA at the National AC. The large club house was packed with 3,500 fans (tickets sold-out) that showed up to witness the bout and were given a treat as McGovern come out like the McGovern of old and annihilated Murphy at 2:08 (some list 2:02) of the first round. Terry beat Murphy into such a helpless state that referee Jack McGuigan had no other alternative other than to stop the bout. Murphy was knocked down four times during the brief encounter and Terry left the ring without a scratch. The articles of agreement called for 127 pounds at 6:00 P.M., and both were under that weight. Betting was pretty lively at even money. Both men appeared to be in good condition when they entered the ring. When the gong sounded the men went right after one another. Murphy was little impressed with McGovern’s reputation as a brawler and stood there toe-to-toe with the terror of Brooklyn on even terms until Terry landed one of his famous straight rights and down Murphy went. It was a devastating punch and it was clear to everyone present that Murphy was in a bad way. As he reached his feet at the count of nine, Murphy staggered across the ring and met with a right uppercut that dropped him like he had been shot! Up again at the count of nine, Murphy was hit with a hard left to the jaw that almost sent him through the ropes, but was pushed back by spectators and turned around into a storm of blows. At this point Tommy was defenseless and after McGovern dropped him on two more occasions referee McGuigan stopped the bout and awarded McGovern the win by technical knockout at 2:08 of the first round. Philadelphia Public Ledger
    1906
    Mar 14 vs. Oscar "Battling" Nelson: This bout took place in Philadelphia, PA at the National AC. L NWS 6PN
    Att: (5000 est) Nelson entered the ring with a record of 40-10-13 (25 KO).
    May 28 vs. Jimmy Britt: The bout took place in New York, NY at Madison Square Garden. Britt’s record coming in was 11-4-1 (5 KO). Att: 4000 (est). Referee: Tim Hurst. W NWS 10 TT
    Oct 17 vs. Young Corbett II: This bout took place in Philadelphia, PA at the National AC. Corbett had a record of 56-10-10 (42 KO) coming into the fight. The bout was one of the bloodiest and most brutal ever witnessed in the city. W NWS 6 PN

    1908
    May 16 vs. Young Loughrey: The bout took place in Philadelphia, PA at the National AC. Going into the bout, Loughrey had a record of 48-21-21 (17 KO). According to the DKJ, Loughrey had the better of the mill. Daily Kennebec Journal has a good write-up of the bout. Daily Kennebec Journal
    May 26 vs. Frank "Spike" Robson: The bout took place in New York, NY at the National AC. The bout was somewhat tame. McGovern started well and landed enough blows to knock out any man had the punches had any steam on them. In the sixth round there was a glimpse of the McGovern of old, but the strength was not there. According to the Washington Post the bout was even. Washington Post



    Exhibition Bouts

    1900
    Feb 21 George Dixon New York, NY EX 3 PI
    Dec 8 Tommy White Milwaukee, WI EX 4 --

    1901
    Jan 18 Louden Campbell Pittsburgh, PA (Bijou Theater) EX 4 PI
    --Campbell was down three times. Every round was a slugging match and Campbell gave McGovern some good shots and gave such a good account of himself that his friends want to see him face Terry in a ten round bout.
    Apr 12 Danny Dougherty Denver, CO (Colorado AC) EX 4 CNP
    Apr 12 Danny Dougherty Denver, CO (Denver Wheel Club) EX 4 CNP
    -The previous 2 bouts were held the same date
    Sep 28 Joe Tipman Baltimore, MD EX 2 --
    Nov 10 Kid Abel Chicago, IL EX 4 --
    Dec 3 John Donahue Reading, PA EX 2 PI

    1904
    Dec 16 Johnny Burdick Pittsfield, MA EX 4 --

    1905
    Dec -- Johnny Burdick Boston, MA EX -- --

    Scheduled Bouts

    1897
    Mar 17 William Downey Brooklyn, NY (Broadway AC) SCH

    McGovern as Referee

    1901
    May 2 Al Neill [KO 1] Jim Trimble Bakersfield, CA


    Notes

    Moved to Brooklyn from Pennsylvania when he was about a year old.

    Short blows to the body followed by a viscous straight right is McGovern’s strongest asset, particularly his work to the body.

    Died of pneumonia and kidney ailment in the charity ward of King's County Hospital, Brooklyn, New, York, USA, on February 22, 1918.
    http://www.antekprizering.com/mcgovernobitpage.html
    Inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame.

    Measurements for his first bout against George Dixon

    McGovern Dixon
    Neck: 15 1/8” 15”
    Biceps: 10 9/10” 10 Ľ”
    Forearm: 9 ˝” 9 ľ”
    Chest: 33 ˝” 34 ľ”
    Wrist: 6 ˝” 7”
    Waist: 27” 26”
    Thigh: 19 ˝” 19”
    Calf: 12 7/8” 12 Ľ”


    Measurements for his first bout against Young Corbett 11/28/1901

    McGovern Corbett
    Age 21 21
    Height 5-3 5-2 1/2
    Neck 14 1/4 15
    Chest 33 1/2 36
    Chest (expanded) 35 1/2 38
    Waist 27 1/2 29
    Thigh 19 1/2 19 1/2
    Calf 13 13
    Biceps 13 13
    Forearm 10 11
    Reach 65 66 ˝



    KO % .5375 (43 Knockouts in 80 Total Bouts)



    Sources
    BDE= Brooklyn Daily Eagle
    REG= Reno Evening Gazette
    NYW= New York World (Courtesy of Deepak)
    PG= Police Gazette
    PEB= Philadelphia Evening Bulletin (Courtesy of Harry Shaffer)
    PR= Philadelphia Record Yearly Results (Courtesy of Chuck Hasson)
    PN= Philly Newspaper Clipping (Courtesy of Chuck Hasson)
    DNSJ= Daily Nevada State Journal
    RC= Record Compilation
    IBRO= Additions and Corrections from IBRO Journals
    NDN= Naugatuck Daily News
    BDW= Bangor Daily Whig
    WP= Washington Post
    TT= Trenton Times
    Various Newspaper Clips from Harry Shaffer

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    Re: Brooklyn's Finest: Terrible Terry McGovern

    Barry, this is wonderful stuff, maestro! I greatly enjoyed reading through it and thank you for taking the trouble.

    Mike

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    Re: Brooklyn's Finest: Terrible Terry McGovern

    all excellant-thanks again.

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    Re: Brooklyn's Finest: Terrible Terry McGovern

    Great article Mike...as usual. As I have said to you, I don't think that there is a more prolific writer, who writes about boxing history, than yourself and I truly enjoy reading each article you write, but what I like best is that you are reminding us all of the names of these great fighters of the past and bringing their boxing career's back to our attention giving them the proper credit that they deserve...just a great job.

    I did see one error though, which has always been repeated throughout the years, but it's the comment about how the Gans-McGovern fight killing boxing in Chicago; it never happened.

    I'm not certain when the claim that Gans-McGovern killed boxing in Chicago started, but following Gans-McGovern, which took place in late 1900, there were 25+ professional boxing cards that were put on in 1901 in Chicago, there were 100+ boxing cards staged in 1902, around 30+ in 1903, around 50+ in 1904, around 20+ in 1905 and so on, so boxing was never killed in the city.

    However, big-time boxing was not to return to Chicago for a couple of decades following the bout, but professional boxing continued to prosper in the city following the bout, but instead of title fights and big name fighters it was mostly local fighters making up the cards.

    I would guess that between 1901 and 1925, or whatever year it was that big-time boxing came back to Chicago, that there were 1000+ different professional boxing cards that were pulled off in Chicago following the Gans-McGovern bout and I have no clue about amateurs, but I imagine that amateur boxing continued as well.

    I am very curious and would love to find out when that claim first started and who started it as I remember reading about it in pretty much every article that I have ever read that talks about that fight. It's just another one of those many myths/inaccuracies that have been passed on down to us to try and correct.

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    Re: Brooklyn's Finest: Terrible Terry McGovern

    Barry, you've got me hooked! I'll do some digging. Fleischer, I'm sure, made similar comments, so I don't know how it all came about.

    Leave it with me, sir!


    Mike C

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    Re: Brooklyn's Finest: Terrible Terry McGovern

    Barry, we discussed this in another thread. It is certainly a bit of hyperbole to say that the McGovern-Gans fight killed boxing in Chicago, but the fact remains that it killed professional boxing except in private clubs.

    Mike, my research has shown the following chronology:

    1. Gans lost to McGovern, which some claimed was a fixed fight. And that got Mayor Harrison all pissy about professional boxing.

    2. In or around July 1901, the Chicago City Council, at the mayor's urging, voted to repeal the ordinance that permitted public boxing in Chicago.

    3. In or around December 1901, Mayor Harrison said bouts "for profit" in Chicago were prohibited, but private clubs could continue to have boxing matches for their members.

    4. Public boxing was legalized again in the 1920s, not long before Dempsey-Tunney II.

    Barry is absolutely correct that professional boxing continued in Chicago. However, the impact was smaller purses for the fighters because the matches were held in smaller private clubs and, thus, the "big name" fighters were less willing to fight in Chicago than before, and certainly not against one another. For example, Tommy Ryan, who lived in Chicago for a time, fought many bouts in Chicago before 1901. After the "ban," Ryan moved to Kansas City and only fought two more times in Chicago.

    Yet, one can say that professional boxing was "killed" in Chciago, in at least two ways: 1. Professional boxing was "killed" in that public professional bouts were illegal. (One could no longer buy a ticket and attend a boxing match in a public venue.) 2. It "killed" boxing in Chicago because, economically, Chicago ceased to be an important boxing city. Limiting boxing to private clubs had a negative impact in terms of the gate sizes and the quality of the matches. For example, Tattersall's - where Gans and McGovern fought - could seat nearly 10,000 people; the largest private club in Chicago - the Chicago Athletic Association - had a seating capacity of maybe 1,000.
    Last edited by raylawpc; 04-28-2007 at 11:54 AM.

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    Re: Brooklyn's Finest: Terrible Terry McGovern

    Professional boxing was still going strong right after the McGovern-Gans bout...there was nothing "killed" about boxing due to the fight other than no big-time fights were held there, but it's still simply just an inaccurate claim that has been passed down through the years just like 1000 other inaccurate boxing myths, which Nat Fleischer spread a slew of them.

    As to fights only being held in clubs...that was not something that was limited to Chicago only. It was the same way in New York at the same time, as well as in several other locals, professional fights were held in private clubs and anyone could become a member of whatever club the same day of a certain fight...all they had to do was buy a fight ticket, but that does not make the fights any less professional...which that era was often refered to as the "Club Membership" days...the "No Decision" era.

    The claim that Gans-McGovern killed boxing in Chicago is just simply wrong, no ifs, ands, or buts about it and there is no way that anyone can say that boxing in Chicago was killed after that bout when around 1000 professional cards were still held! Regardless of the quality of fighter and fights there was still professional boxing in Chicago in the years following the McGovern-Gans bout, hence nothing was killed!
    Last edited by BDeskins; 04-28-2007 at 12:05 PM.

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    Re: Brooklyn's Finest: Terrible Terry McGovern

    Literally killed, no. Figuratively, if you compare boxing in Chicago before and after the McGovern-Gans fight, one could say that "killed" was an apt description of the situation.

    Barry, do you have any contemporareous materials showing that one could become a club member "for a day" in Chicago? I could be wrong, but my understanding was that in Chicago, one attended a boxing match either as a legitmate member of the club, or as the guest of a member.

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    Re: Brooklyn's Finest: Terrible Terry McGovern

    >>>one could say that "killed" was an apt description of the situation.<<<

    Maybe if there would have been only around five, or ten professional shows during that those years then yeah, that might work a little better, but it's just plain wrong and rather silly to try and claim it when close to 1000 professional fights were staged during that time.


    >>>Barry, do you have any contemporareous materials showing that one could become a club member "for a day" in Chicago? I could be wrong, but my understanding was that in Chicago, one attended a boxing match either as a legitmate member of the club, or as the guest of a member.<<<

    I've got a bunch of articles on those days...Ring magazine ran a really good series on the Club Membership days in the early 1930s. I don't know exactly how it worked, but pretty much anyone could join a club on the day of a fight, unless it was a club that practiced racial exclusion, or perhaps some upitty rich members club, but for the most part anyone could get a membership the same day of a fight...whether they were then considered regular club members I don't know. The club membership was just a way to kind of settle down the reformers who were calling for boxing to be abolished, but it really had little effect on boxing...especially in New York as big-time fights were staged under the ND rules.

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    Re: Brooklyn's Finest: Terrible Terry McGovern

    I don't believe club membership worked the same in all states; my understanding is that it was quite restrictive in Chicago. What you describe is certainly the way New York worked under the Horton Law.

    I would appreciate it if you would someday share that Ring article with me.

    Barry, I have the utmost respect for your knowledge of boxing. Shall we agree to disagree, and leave it at that?

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    Re: Brooklyn's Finest: Terrible Terry McGovern

    Actually the Ring articles cover several states...Boston, Philly, New york, Chicago, California...it's not just one article!

    But regardless of how the club membership worked...boxing was never killed in Chicago...plain and simple! If it had been the there would have been NO, NO boxing in Chicago, but that is so not the case!



    >>>Shall we agree to disagree, and leave it at that?<<<


    We can do that, but I don't see what the debate is...as I showed...professional boxing was never killed in Chicago...that's a fact...not opinion!

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    Re: Brooklyn's Finest: Terrible Terry McGovern

    Now down through the years, if it had been said and passed down that the Gans-McGovern fight would effect boxing in Chicago for some 20 years following the fight in the city, well that would be very accurate as it did effect who fought there, but boxing killed in Chicago...that's just not true!

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    Re: Brooklyn's Finest: Terrible Terry McGovern

    Okay. How about if we agree that McGovern-Gans killed Chicago as a major venue for the next 25 years, and that the statement morphed through the years into McGovern-Gans "killed boxing in Chicago?"
    Last edited by raylawpc; 04-30-2007 at 12:37 AM.

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    Re: Brooklyn's Finest: Terrible Terry McGovern

    >>>and that the statement morphed through the years into McGovern-Gans "killed boxing in Chicago?"<<<

    Thats what I had always read until I decided to look it up myself...I don't recall how early it was started, but I think it was being claimed as early as the 20s.

    As to agreeing on killed...killed is a term and action that is so final...

    I think I would prefer to use a phrase like "The public reaction to the outcome of the McGovern-Gans bout negatively effected big-time boxing in Chicago for many years following the fight."

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    Re: Brooklyn's Finest: Terrible Terry McGovern

    Or maybe "affected."
    Pete "Just Being A Butthole Before Going Off to Bed" Leo.

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    Re: Brooklyn's Finest: Terrible Terry McGovern

    I always have problems with those two...I use to have the same problem with their and they're.

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    Re: Brooklyn's Finest: Terrible Terry McGovern

    What about stalactite and stalagmite? PeteLeo.

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    Re: Brooklyn's Finest: Terrible Terry McGovern

    Quote Originally Posted by BDeskins
    Actually the Ring articles cover several states...Boston, Philly, New york, Chicago, California...it's not just one article!
    Barry, if there is anyway to get copies of those articles from you, I would appreciate it very much. In fact, if you have the dates of the Ring magazines in which they appeared, I can get copies of the articles from another source. Thanks.

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    Re: Brooklyn's Finest: Terrible Terry McGovern

    My dear Barry/Ray/Pete and all,

    I haven't forgotten this one - I'm still collating all my info on Terry's battle with Joe.

    Will get back to you as soon as I can, gents...

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    Re: Brooklyn's Finest: Terrible Terry McGovern

    Mike, it sounds like an article is in the works!! You might also want to look at an earlier thread on this very topic, which has a lot of good points pro and con regarding the legitmacy of the fight: "Was Mcgovern-gans Really A Fake?" The discussion extended over 5 pages.

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    Re: Brooklyn's Finest: Terrible Terry McGovern

    Ray, I saw it - and it's making me itch more and more.

    You rascals, you!

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    Re: Brooklyn's Finest: Terrible Terry McGovern

    You have my permission to quote any and all of the excellent points I made on both threads - just spell the name right!

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