Home News Current Champs WAIL! Encyclopedia
The Cyber Boxing Zone Message Board
+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: Jones-Hanshaw Prefight Press & Discussion

  1. #1
    MANAGING EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    In an undisclosed bunker deep in the weird, wild, woods of the Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    11,450
    vCash
    500

    Jones-Hanshaw Prefight Press & Discussion

    Roy’s “Phase One” Begins with Hanshaw
    By Doug Fischer from Max Boxing

    Goals.

    Every boxer at every level of the sport has them – needs them – whether it’s earning a trainer’s praise or the respect of one’s peers, or winning a trophy, a gold medal, a world title, or just making enough money to put food on the table.

    But what about those few boxers who have seemingly done and won everything the sport has to offer? What about those celebrated gladiators who won fame and fortunes, as well as multiple world titles, as contract fighters for premium cable networks?

    Believe it or not, those guys need goals even more than the average pugs. They don’t need the money, but being fighters at heart they don’t want to walk away, either. For these chosen few it’s either fight or get fat; fight or be forgotten.

    The goal for Fernando Vargas is to go out with a victory. For Evander Holyfield it’s to win the heavyweight title (or at least a portion of it) one last time.

    The goal for Roy Jones, who takes on unbeaten Anthony Hanshaw tomorrow night in Biloxi, Mississippi (available on iN DEMAND PPV), is less tangible than those of Vargas and Holyfield.

    Jones’s goal is not just to earn another ‘W’ or more hardware to add to his collection of championship belts. The former four-division champ says he wants to regain the mythical title of Pound-for-Pound best. That’s the dream that drives the 38-year-old veteran who knows he’s a first-ballot hall of famer to continue to fight.

    Having held the very subjunctive status of “pound-for-pound king” for the better part of nine years (on and off, depending on who you ask, between late ‘94 when he dominated James Toney to mid ’04 when he was knocked out by Antonio Tarver), Jones realizes that the recognition doesn’t occur overnight.

    That’s OK. He says that Hanshaw, the second opponent of a comeback that began last July after he suffered three consecutive losses in ’04 and ’05, is “phase one” of his road back to being no. 1 in the minds of boxing fans.

    Jones is too proud to admit it, but he misses the fans. He misses being in the spotlight, and I bothers him that he isn’t going to be the focus of the majority of the boxing world tomorrow night when three attractive welterweight showdowns will be broadcast by his former network, HBO, (and numerous other title fights and significant bouts take place around the globe).

    However, he’s doing his part to make tomorrow’s fight with Hanshaw, a 29-year-old super middleweight contender with a 21-0-1 (14) record, the biggest event that it can be in the Biloxi area.

    Back when Jones was champ and the pound-for-pound king, he sequestered himself from the media, the public, and even the cameras of HBO, which whom he had a very lucrative contract with, whenever he trained. He thought he was doing the world a favor if he took 30 minutes out to conduct a conference call for the press.

    But for the Hanshaw fight, Jones has made himself available to most media requests. He has probably done more one-on-one interviews with boxing writers and sports radio hosts in the past four weeks than he did in the last four years of his light heavyweight title reign.

    Last week Jones did something that was inconceivable five years ago – he conducted a public sparring session in front of 500 onlookers outside of the IP Casino Resort where his fight will take place.

    “Something like that used to be out of the question,” Jones told MaxBoxing. “Back then if a fighter wasn’t familiar with my style it took him a long time to figure me out. So I wasn’t about to allow anyone study me and my style by letting people and video cameras into my training camps.

    “But now, everyone pretty much knows my style. I’m 38 years old now. I got 54 fights. I got nothing to hide, so I might as well bring it to the people.”

    Jones said he enjoyed going rounds with Mexican Olympian Alfred Angulo and Nigerian prospect Akinyemi Laleye in front of the public.

    “I never would have done that years ago,” he said, “but boxing is fun for me now.

    “When I see fans come out for me or hear them ask about me on radio shows it shows me what a blessing from God my career has been.”

    He’s hoping tomorrow’s fight will be a bit of a blessing for the Biloxi waterfront and resort area which was hit very hard by Hurricane Katrina two years ago.

    “It means a lot for Biloxi,” Jones said. “Hurricane Katrina took a lot from this area. Holding a big fight here lets people know that it’s coming back. It makes people stop and pay attention to the area. ‘Roy Jones is fighting here and he’s not just fighting anyone, he’s fighting a young, undefeated cat, so he’s giving us a real fight’. It gets people to come on out and it lets the world know that Biloxi is back.”

    Jones wants to let the boxing world know that he’s back with tomorrow’s fight.

    Last year’s unanimous decision over journeyman Prince Badi Ajamu, in Idaho of all places, was just to prove to himself that he still had the legs to go 12 rounds and the reflexes to out-box a limited opponent.

    Against Hanshaw, Jones says he wants to do more than go the distance and win. He wants to impress.

    “Against Hanshaw I’ve got to make a statement right from the get-go because he likes to get the fight started right away,” Jones said. “Hanshaw wants to keep the pressure on you, so he has to be dealt with early because if you let him get confident you’ll have a problem. I know what I’ve got in front of me. I’ve been watching him for about one and half years. I know that he was a high-profile amateur boxer and I know that he’s very aggressive as a pro.”

    Jones used to eat guys with Hanshaw’s style for breakfast.

    Remember when he shutout Jorge Castro in his first step-up fight as a middleweight prospect? Remember when he toyed with and then blasted out Antoine Byrd and Bryant Bannon after he matured into the most physically gifted super middleweight the world has ever seen?

    “I still like fighting guys with that style,” he said.

    However, these days, people who care about Jones worry when he fights pressure fighters.

    The chilling image of Jones stretched out for minutes after being brutally dropped in the ninth round of his fight with Glen Johnson is the reason for this concern. It was also the beginning of an eventual split between Jones and HBO, the cable network that enjoyed an exclusive relationship with the Pensacola native from his first title win (vs. Bernard Hopkins) in ’93 to his rubbermatch loss to Tarver in ’05.

    The folks at HBO urged Jones to retire for his own good, and even offered him a gig as a co-commentator beside broadcast mainstays Larry Merchant and Jim Lampley as incentive to hang his gloves up.

    When Jones was in his prime, HBO practically allowed him pick his own opponents (and they made him rich in the process), but the fighter didn’t view the network’s pressure to get him to quit as an act of compassion. Jones saw it as “lack of faith” and accepted it like a slap across the face.

    “I always thought they had my best interests in mind but the way they handled my third fight with Tarver showed me otherwise,” Jones said. “They said they were worried about my health and well being, but if they really cared about me they would have let me take a tune-up fight before the [Tarver] fight.

    “I had been off for a whole year, I wanted a tune-up fight before that fight, but they wouldn’t allow it.

    “They supposedly cared about me, but what they basically tried to do with me was what the New York boxing commission tried to do with Evander Holyfield when they took away his license after one fight with Larry Donald.

    “Come on, you can’t do that. Donald was the wrong style for Holyfield. Donald might have done the same thing to Evander when he was in his prime. Now you see Holyfield in with the right kind of styles and he looks good.

    “Same thing with me, you can’t make me retire because I lost to two fighters. How many fights has Arturo Gatti lost and how many times have they [HBO] let him come back? How come Gatti keeps getting fights and they give him tune-ups, too? So that right there showed me something about them.”

    Of course, Jones views boxers like Gianluca Branco, Thomas Damgaard, and Gatti’s opponent tomorrow night, Alfonso Gomez, as a “tune-ups” but guys like these often turn into grueling struggles for the popular New Jersey-based fighter. Jones used to dominate second-tier fighters like that with ridiculous ease. In many ways, Jones was a victim of his own talent. The public was so used to seeing him shutout solid fighters for so long that it was almost shocking to see him struggle (the way Gatti always does) against Tarver in their first bout.

    Jones, who had previously gained 20 to 25 pounds in order to take on John Ruiz in early ’03, lost the muscle mass in order to fight Tarver at light heavyweight later that year, a move that took a heavy physical toll on his body. For most boxing observers that fight was Jones’s last hurrah as a world-class fighter.

    For Jones’s diehard fans it was the biggest mistake of his career, one that cost him his claim to being one of the all-time greats. They theorize that if Jones had stayed at heavyweight and defended the WBA title he easily lifted from Ruiz against a still-respected Evander Holyfield in early ’04 (a fight that was being discussed) their man could have retired with many members of the sports media lauding him as the G.O.A.T.

    It was not to be and Jones says he has no regrets.

    “Not at all,” he said. “I told Tarver and I told the media that I would fight him. So I did. That’s me. That’s how I am. In the middle of that training camp I could feel how the weight loss was effecting me, but I wasn’t about to pull out of the fight. I don’t do that.

    “My training for Glen Johnson was disrupted by Hurricane Ivan. I also got sick during that camp, but I was not going to pull out. I was not going to postpone the bout because, once again, that’s not me.

    “I don’t regret losing because it got me back on my game; it put me back on my game plan. I had put my training on cruise control. I stopped doing all the little things that I used to do while training. A perfect example is basketball. I used to always play basketball during my camps. I would play four and five times a week. It was part of my training. It was part of my competitive edge.

    “Before the Tarver and Johnson fights, I wasn’t playing basketball as much. I wasn’t in the same physical condition.”

    Jones says he wasn’t in the same psychological condition, either.

    “It had gotten too easy,” he says. “I lost focus. I was mentally not there. I wasn’t playing basketball; I wasn’t paying attention to my music. I wasn’t being competitive in the other parts of my life.”

    And if he isn’t being competitive, he isn’t being Roy Jones.

    “In everything I do, I have to do it 100 percent,” he said. “I have to compete.”

    Jones is fighting Hanshaw tomorrow, but in his mind, he’s competing with a couple of little guys he’ll never get in the ring with – Floyd Mayweather Jr. and Manny Pacquaio, the two fighters he sees as the best in the world, pound for pound, at the moment.

    Like a lot of fans, he loves to watch Pacquiao fight, but being a boxer by nature he appreciates more of what Mayweather does in the ring.

    “Manny is a real good fighter, but he’s more busy than skillful,” he said. “He’s the type of fighter that overwhelms other fighters with his heart and his conditioning, but even though he beat Marco Antonio Barrera, I don’t think he’s better than Barrera. I’d still say Barrera’s better, pound for pound, than Manny. To me Manny’s the busiest fighter in the world, but he’s not a thinking fighter and he’s not one to show boxing technique, and that’s not what being pound-for-pound is about.

    “Pound-for-pound is not a popularity contest. It’s about being able to do it all in the ring – offensively AND defensively – at the highest level, and right now Floyd is the best at executing ring generalship.”

    When asked if he would consider the winner of next Saturday’s showdown between Bernard Hopkins and Winky Wright (two fighters that are in the top five or at least top 10 of most boxing writers’ pound-for-pound lists) to be no. 1, Jones was dismissive.

    “Absolutely not,” he said. “First of all, there shouldn’t be any pound-for-pound lists. There’s no. 1 and then there’s everybody else. Second, you’ve never seen any one-punch knockouts with Hopkins and Wright. They never really knocked anybody out who was world class. When I said you got to be able to do it all, I meant DO IT ALL! And that includes punch.”

    That is something the prime Roy Jones had that the current version of Floyd Mayweather lacks.

    “Watch for it when I fight Hanshaw,” he said. “I’m getting back on top. I’m getting my skills together. You won’t see everything that I used to do, but you’ll see a little bit of it. Fans who tune in will see phase one for the return of Roy Jones.”

    And if he’s successful tomorrow night?

    “Then it’s on to phase two,” he said, “which is more skills and more of what fans used to see from me but against a higher profile opponent. Boxing needs a big fight right now. Maybe me and Felix Trinidad could be the one. But I’m not calling him out. I’m just saying that whoever’s next will be well known and will get fans excited.

    “Listen, this goes out to any of the top fighters in the world from 168 pounds to heavyweight, if you think you great and you wanna make a date, let’s get it on.”

  2. #2
    MANAGING EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    In an undisclosed bunker deep in the weird, wild, woods of the Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    11,450
    vCash
    500

    Re: Jones-Hanshaw Prefight Press & Discussion

    Who Will Pay To See Roy Jones On Saturday?
    By Michael Woods from Sweet Science

    You must hand it to Roy Jones, and the promoters of his Saturday fight with Tony Hanshaw: they have worked almost every promotional angle, short of attempting the “Vargas Snap,” to hype up the PPV offering.

    Will it work? What do you think? Have you considered paying $30 to see what Jones has left, when you could delve into an almost free tripleheader of fairly intriguing fare on HBO?

    I don’t frankly see more than about 40,000 hardcore Roy fans ponying up to see the Jones/Hanshaw card (which also features Oscar Diaz and Smoke Gainer in semi-tough scraps), but fight fans are loyal lot. That is why we have a situation like this one, where the main broadcast players aren’t sufficiently compelled with Jones/Hanshaw to put up a decent stake, and event organizers are “forced” to go the PPV route.

    This one is a headscratcher of major proportions, though. HBO, I thought, had already booked July 14 for their tripleheader. It’s not like Jones and Murad Muhammad picked the date, and then Kery Davis and crew came with supersoakers to rain on their parade, right?

    The promoters of the Jones scrap maintain they had the date first, however, and some checking shows that the first mainstream media mention of Jones/Hanshaw came on April 6 in the Cleveland Plain Dealer. Joe Maxse speculated that the event would go down on June 9.

    The first mainstream media mention I see of the HBO Margarito/Williams/Gatti/Cintron offering came on April 26, from Keith Idec in the NJ Herald News, twenty days later.

    The first time I see July 14 mentioned as a date for Roy vs. Hanshaw is in the NY Daily News by Tim Smith on May 20.

    So where’s the truth? As always in boxing, probably somewhere hidden in the middle, under a pile of contention and puffery.

    Jones, who arrived almost two hours late for a press conference at the IP Casino-Resort-Spa on Thursday, has at least provided some decent soundbites and drama leading in to the affair.

    "I am dishing out torture Saturday night,” the 38-year-old Pensacolan said. “Can you all say "and still"? I will not touch Hanshaw until Saturday night. I will tear his ass up! They (the Hanshaw camp) are professionals and so is my camp. I am getting ready to go! The games are over Saturday night and the torture chambers open up.

    Roy took the opportunity to rap two fighters he still sees as rivals in skill and prolifle. “This ain't gonna be like Mayweather-De La Hoya with all that talking and, when the bell rang, northing happened,” Jones said. “This is going to be pain and torture for Hanshaw!"

    Hanshaw, a 29-year-old Ohioan, too has risen to the occasion with his pre-fight bluster. OK, he’s not in Mayorga’s league, but how many are?

    “I was about to fall asleep up here,” he said. “I have worked too hard for this. This is my whole life! I am ready to rock and roll. On Saturday night, I will put Roy Jones' old ass on the canvas.

    The day before, Hanshaw promised the press fireworks on Saturday.

    "I want to say this now, right to Roy's face...Roy, you have been knocked out by (Antonio Tarver, by Glen Johnson...this will be another repeat on July 14."

    When trying to stir the PPV pot, it never hurts to have PBF Sr. around to spew some.

    "My son, Floyd Mayweather Jr., is the world's best, pound for pound,” Senior said. “Don't be shocked, Roy Jones, when you get stopped by Tony Hanshaw. Roy is an emotional fighter and when emotion steps in, logic steps out."

    Lou Duva, age 85, added his voice, and aura of decency, to the mix.

    "Roy Jones is going to win by a knockout,” Duva said. “Hanshaw's team, if they are looking for bets, can come to me. I got Roy Jones but the boxing fans at the Mississippi Coast Coliseum and watching all around the world on PPV TV will be the winners. I know there are other fight shows on TV but only this show has a real legend and that is this one here with Roy Jones. Be sure to watch my guy, welterweight Oscar Diaz from San Antonio, in the co-feature. What Hanshaw should be doing is kissing Roy Jones for Roy giving him this great opportunity.”

    Murad Muhammad put in his two cents.

    "There will be 380 countries watching this event,” he said. “They will see that the Gulf was down on its knees but is getting back better than ever.”

    Let’s see, let’s do some math, and try to put this proposition in clearer economical focus. 380 countries, times 2,000 watchers per country (yes, this is truly theoretical, from the depths of my butt, conjecture here), that equals 760,000 buys. That times $29.95, comes out to $22,762,000.

    Whoa, maybe Murad and Roy and Co. will come out of this better financially than we can guess. But wait. Let it not be said that we don’t do some real journalism here at TSS. Let me quickly bop over to my trusty Google, and fact-check ole Murad.

    Wha…what’s this?

    About.com geography expert, Matt Rosenberg, says that there are 194 countries in the world. Some territories, or regions-—like Bermuda, Puerto Rico, and the UK, are actually governed by other nations—-but seemingly Murad was counting those. And the other 200 countries he’s talking about? Does he consider Brooklyn, Queens and the Bronx separate countries? Has Murad gone and wired up Mars, Pluto and Uranus for cable, and is factoring those locations in?

    Hyperbole is part of the game when it comes to promoting a fight. So let’s just chalk up Muhammad’s math muff to fight-time, hype-time excess. Let’s also hope that Jones and Hanshaw is a pleasing scrap, and at the end of the day, everyone gets their check.

  3. #3
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    126
    vCash
    500

    Re: Jones-Hanshaw Prefight Press & Discussion

    Well Jones won a unanimous decision. He knocked down Hanshaw in the 11th . Jones fought on the ropes for much of the fight where he wasn't as effective as when he was at the center of the ring.

    One card had it 114-113 , the others were more lopsided.

    A good win for Roy but really why keep fighting ?

  4. #4
    Roberto Aqui
    Guest

    Re: Jones-Hanshaw Prefight Press & Discussion

    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas44
    A good win for Roy but really why keep fighting ?
    I hope to see the fight so I can see where he's at. Laying on the ropes is what got him in trouble w/Johnson. Guess Hanshaw didn't have enough pop.

    Roy could probably beat Woods still, and Woods is near Roy's age, a perfect fight. Roy calling out Wlad is just plain stupid, and a case in point as to why he should retire. He sure didn't want that fight after Ruiz when he could've commanded the bucks, so he's just acting punchdrunk if he thinks he can take Wlad.

    Roy should take the Woods fight and grant him every condition. That's about the only title I see he's got a chance for.

    Then retire to his pitbull and chicken farm or get involved as a local promoter if he wants to add back to his community..

  5. #5
    Administrator
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    3,384
    vCash
    500

    Re: Jones-Hanshaw Prefight Press & Discussion

    I haven't had a chance to watch the entire fight yet but I did see the knockdown. It was a classic RJJ, blistering fast, 3 punch combination that started the hurt...thrown in close as he was backed into the ropes. RJJ then chased him down with a lead right I believe to finish the KD. It almost made you think he wasn't so old for a minute.

    From the little I flipped through (and I hate to say so) RJJ looked pretty fresh & energetic. Much more saw than against Ajamu. RJJ still gets backed into the ropes, covers up & doesn't fire much but in the middle he couldn't be touched. He seemed to deal with Hanshaw's pressure pretty well. I'll report a little more later once I get a full viewing in.

    I agree that he will probably still beat Woods. I was real shocked to hear that RJJ was so willing to go back to 168. I find that very hard to believe but given that he had not been looking as muscular as he once was, maybe he can pull it off. Calling out Wlad is completely insane and he can't possibly mean a syllable of that sentance. He is a confused man.

  6. #6
    Administrator
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    3,384
    vCash
    500

    Re: Jones-Hanshaw Prefight Press & Discussion

    I just caught the majority of this fight and I have to say this looks just about like the RJJ of 5 years ago and this is coming from someone who though Hanshaw had a solid shot to take RJJ so color me surprised & impressed. Hanshaw may not have the punch or strength of a true light heavy but he certainly showed great determination & good skill. He put solid pressure on RJJ throughout the fight but RJJ absolutely did not look like the broken fighter he was the past few fights. RJJ showed plenty of speed and willingness to fight a tough fight and looked good in doing so.

    As if it wasn't a tease enough, as I mentioned RJJ put Hanshaw down with a peach of a combination in the 11th round ala classic RJJ stuff. It was a right cross followed by a left cross & uppercut. All 3 punches were thrown in less than a second. No boxing fan could help but be impressed by what he tagged this kid with. Youtube this fight asap, I'm sure someone had to have cut this clip out by now.

    All this being said, I still think RJJ should retire. This is a win to be proud of & go out on. Regardless of how he looked, time is not going to be kind to him and it's apparent RJJ wants bigger challenges now. He takes Wood and BHop still IMO but I would not want to see him in with Tarver again or anyone bigger. He will whoop Tito if that fight happens....I guarantee he will be begging for the winner of Calzaghe or Kessler this fall too.

    Hanshaw is a good & tough kid and I hope he gets some action in super middle or light heavy.

    Call me a Ranger fan but I loved hearing Sam Rosen call this fight. I had no idea he even did that. I thought Rosen was great, he is a real professional.

  7. #7
    Banned
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    2,890
    vCash
    500

    Re: Jones-Hanshaw Prefight Press & Discussion

    Rosen used to call the fights on the MSG Network when they had their own weekly/monthly series. He still does the Golden Gloves, I think. I've heard him plenty of times doing boxing but never hockey. I, uh, don't much care for slippy/slidey sports. PeteLeo.

  8. #8
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    126
    vCash
    500

    Re: Jones-Hanshaw Prefight Press & Discussion

    Dig - Good post . I just watched the youtube clip showing the round of the knockdown. Roy is still fast but dammit holding the left hand low is gonna result in another KO ala Glen Johnson.

    After Kessler disposes Calzaghe I wonder if Roy would fight Mikkel ?

  9. #9
    Administrator
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    3,384
    vCash
    500

    Re: Jones-Hanshaw Prefight Press & Discussion

    I was impressed how the threw the combo so tight & how he actually threw the hook/cross over Hanshaw's arm then retracted & fired an uppercut under Hanshaw's arm. Beautiful stuff.

    Kessler is no lock to win that fight IMO. I'm about 55/45 for Calzaghe at the moment. I think RJJ may figure to try & call out either guy. He is looking for some recognition & respect again it seems.

  10. #10
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    43
    vCash
    500

    Re: Jones-Hanshaw Prefight Press & Discussion

    Anybody think that Roy's losses in more recent years may be due more to mental than physical things? A lot of guys that go untested, suddenly lose it the first time they get it handed to them.

  11. #11
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    A lair deep in the Maine woods
    Posts
    520
    vCash
    500

    Re: Jones-Hanshaw Prefight Press & Discussion


+ Reply to Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
News Current Champs WAIL! Encyclopedia Links Home