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Thread: 2008 HOF Nominees

  1. #121
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    Holmes moved by induction into boxing's Hall

    Former heavyweight champion leads 11 others into Hall of Fame

    updated 7:13 p.m. ET, Sun., June. 8, 2008
    CANASTOTA, N.Y. - With a precise, powerful left jab, Larry Holmes reigned as heavyweight champion for more than seven years, successfully defending his crown 20 times — the second longest title run in heavyweight history.

    But on Sunday, the “Easton Assassin” needed a moment to compose himself before accepting his induction into the International Boxing Hall of Fame along with 11 other champions and ring personalities.

    “I’m sorry. I’m choked up a little bit. Why not?” Holmes said, receiving a sustained ovation from the crowd of nearly 1,000.

    “When you get to this point, when people come out to salute you like this ... it makes you want to cry. So if I cry, cry with me because I feel good,” said Holmes.

    Holmes headlined the 2008 induction class, which also included junior welterweight champion Eddie Perkins and late middleweight Holman Williams. All three are in the hall’s modern-era category.

    Middleweights Len Harvey and Frank Klaus and welterweight Harry Lewis were honored in the old-timer category, and 19th-century Irish heavyweight Dan Donnelly in the pioneer class.

    A seventh-grade dropout who forged his body in eastern Pennsylvania’s steel mills and honed his boxing skills in a Police Athletic League gym, Holmes compiled a record of 69-6, with 44 knockouts. He was heavyweight champion from 1978-1985. His 20 successful title defenses were surpassed only by Joe Louis with 25. Holmes nearly matched Rocky Marciano’s perfect 49-0 mark when he was upset by Michael Spinks for his first loss.

    Despite his impressive resume, Holmes always has been under-appreciated — mostly because he defended his title against any fighter, regardless of ranking or name.

    “I wanted to defend the title properly. I wanted to give everybody the opportunity to fight,” Holmes told the crowd, which included a large contingent of family and friends from Easton, Pa., among them his 3-week-old great granddaughter and 1980 Heisman Trophy winner George Rogers.

    “I didn’t get into boxing to become the heavyweight champion of the world. I didn’t get into boxing to get into the hall of fame. I got into boxing to make money and pay the rent,” said Holmes, now 58 but just five years removed from his last fight.

    Holmes said his detractors were his greatest motivation — including famed sportscaster Howard Cosell, who Holmes remembered said “my legs were too small, I couldn’t punch and I was just a copy of Muhammad Ali.”

    Holmes had thanks for many people who helped his career, even singling out his sparring partners. But he gave special credit to promoter Don King for taking a chance on him on the start.

    “When I was coming up, no one thought about Larry Holmes. Everybody I went to turned me down. No one would give a dime for my career,” Holmes said.

    “I told people I was going to be the heavyweight champion of the world. They said I was crazy. People said you can’t be the heavyweight champ. Muhammad Ali is out there. Joe Frazier is out there. Ken Norton is out there. George Foreman is out there.

    “I was determined to be the heavyweight champion of the world because I wanted to prove to those who said I couldn’t do it, that I could do it,” Holmes said.

    After an early career that included 18 months as Ali’s sparring partner, Holmes beat WBC heavyweight champion Ken Norton in Las Vegas by decision on June 9, 1978, winning the fight with a final round cited by many as one of the greatest in boxing history.

    Holmes’ string of successful title defenses ended in 1985 when he was upset by Michael Spinks in a 15-round decision. He retired in 1986 after losing a rematch with Spinks.

    In 1988, the then 38-year-old Holmes was lured out of retirement by a $3 million purse to challenge Mike Tyson, the undisputed champion. Tyson knocked out Holmes in the fourth round, the first and only time Holmes would be knocked out in his career. Holmes again retired.

    He returned to the ring again in 1990. In 1992, he upset undefeated 1988 Olympic heavyweight champ Ray Mercer, but lost a 12-round decision to Evander Holyfield in a title fight. Holmes got a last title shot in 1995 at 45, losing the WBC title by decision to Oliver McCall.

    Since retiring, Holmes has become a successful businessman in his hometown and has helped fund numerous youth organizations.

    In honor of Holmes’ induction, Easton Mayor Salvatore Panto read a proclamation that recognized Holmes for his humanity.

    “It’s not just his boxing accomplishments were are so proud of. What we are more proud of is what he has down with those accomplishments,” said Panto, who grew up in the same projects as Holmes and has been a lifelong friend.

    Also inducted Sunday as non-participants or observers were trainer Bill Gore, promoters Mogens Palle and Frank Warren and journalists Dave Anderson and Joe Koizumi.

    Hawk

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    Bump

    Hawk

  3. #123
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    2009 Inductees

    Lewis, five others to be inducted into Hall of Fame

    Associated Press

    Updated: December 9, 2008, 1:23 PM ET

    CANASTOTA, N.Y. -- Three-time heavyweight champion Lennox Lewis headlines the 2009 induction class into the International Boxing Hall of Fame.

    Lewis enters as a modern-era fighter, along with American bantamweight champion Orlando Canizales and South African junior lightweight champion Brian Mitchell.

    Posthumous honorees are middleweight champion William "Gorilla" Jones, welterweight champion "Mysterious" Billy Smith and middleweight champion Billy Soose.

    Inductees were voted in by members of the Boxing Writers Association and a panel of international boxing historians. The induction ceremony is June 14.

    The 43-year-old Lewis retired in 2003 with a record of 41-2-1, including 32 KOs, and enters the hall in his first year of eligibility.

    Copyright 2008 by The Associated Press

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    Re: 2009 Inductees

    Short biographies of the 14 boxing hall inductees


    CANASTOTA, N.Y. — A brief look at the 14 people who will be inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame on June 14, 2009:

    ORLANDO CANIZALES - Born Nov. 25, 1965, Laredo, Texas. Began professional career in August 1984. Won NABF flyweight title from Armando Velasco in 1987 with a fourth-round KO. In 1988, he added USBA super flyweight title with a second-round TKO over Louis Curtis. Moved up in weight and won the IBF bantamweight championship with a 15th-round TKO over Kelvin Seabrooks. Over the next six years, Canizales successfully defended his title a division-record 16 consecutive times. Abdicated title in 1994 to fight as super bantamweight and dropped 12-round split decision to WBA champion Wilfredo Benitez in January 1995. Retired in 1999 with a record of 50-5-1 and 37 KOs.

    PAUL GALLICO - Born July 26, 1897 in New York. Famed novelist ("Poseidon Adventure," "The Pride of the Yankees"), sports writer for the New York Daily News and creator of the Golden Gloves boxing tournament in 1927. Gallico famously sparred with Jack Dempsey - and was knocked out in two minutes - to write a column about what it was like to be hit by the heavyweight champion. Died July 15, 1976.

    BILLY GIBSON - Born in 1876. Manager of Hall of Fame champions (lightweight) Benny Leonard and (heavyweight) Gene Tunney, also served as a matchmaker and promoter at the Fairmont Athletic Club and Madison Square Garden in early 1900s-1920s. Died July 21, 1947.

    BOB GOODMAN - Born June 8, 1939, in New York. Son of Hall of Fame publicist Murray Goodman. With his father, formed Murray Goodman Associates and handled public relations for major bouts involving Ken Norton, Bob Foster, Joe Frazier and Muhammad Ali and big events for Top Rank and Don King Productions. Later became matchmaker at Madison Square Garden Boxing.

    ABE GREENE - Born in 1899, credited with revitalizing boxing in New Jersey. Worked as a newspaperman at the Paterson Evening News for 56 years. Served as New Jersey state boxing commissioner from 1937-1953 and from 1971-1983. Was president of National Boxing Association 1941-1948 and in 1970 elected lifetime commissioner by the WBA. Died Sept. 22, 1988.

    AKIHIKO HONDA - Born Sept. 9, 1947. Took over Teiken Promotions at age 17 following untimely death of father and developed it into one of Japan's most influential and successful promotional companies. Among the fights promoted were ones involving Mike Tyson, Tony Tubbs and Buster Douglas. Has guided the careers of more than a half dozen champions, including current fighters Roman Gonzales and Edwin Valero.

    TOM HYER - Born Jan. 1, 1819, is the first recognized heavyweight champion of America. Won the title in 1841 by defeating George McChester in 101 rounds, a fight that took nearly three hours. Died of a heart attack at age 45 on June 26, 1864.

    WILLIAM "GORILLA" JONES - Born in Memphis, Tenn., May 12, 1906. Turned pro in 1924. Jones stopped Oddone Piazza with a sixth-round TKO to win NBA middleweight title in 1931. After title loss to Marcel Thil, Jones regained the NBA crown in 1933 with a seventh-round KO of Sammy Slaughter. Retired in 1940 with a career mark of 101-24-13 and 52 KOs. In retirement, became chauffeur and bodyguard for Hollywood starlet Mae West. Died Jan. 4, 1982.

    LENNOX LEWIS - Born Sept. 2, 1965, in West Ham, England. Defeated Riddick Bowe for 1988 Olympic super heavyweight gold medal. Turned professional in 1989 and claimed vacant WBC heavyweight title with a second-round TKO of Donovan "Razor" Ruddock in 1992. After losing championship to Oliver McCall in 1994, took it back in 1997 with a fifth-round TKO. Fought to a controversial draw in March 1999 with Evander Holyfield in what was then the highest-grossing fight ever at Madison Square Garden. Defeated Holyfield eight months later to win WBA/IBF belts and unify championship. Reclaimed the title in a 2001 rematch with Hasim Rahman. Knocked out Mike Tyson in the 8th round in 2002. Retired in 2003 with a record of 41-2-1 and 32 KOs.

    HUGH MCILVANNEY - Born in Kilmamock, Scotland, in Feb. 2, 1934. One of the most respected voices in British sports journalism, McIlvanney is an award-winning writer. He currently writes a weekly column for The Sunday Times and has been ringside for boxing legends from Muhammad Ali to Roy Jones Jr.

    LARRY MERCHANT - Born Feb. 11, 1931, in New York City, has been a sports writer for the Philadelphia Daily News, New York Post and Los Angeles Herald-Examiner. In 1978, he joined HBO sports as an expert analyst for boxing.

    BRIAN MITCHELL - Born Aug. 30, 1961 in Johannesburg, South Africa. Turned pro in 1981 and won South African junior lightweight crown in 1983. Won the WBA title in September 1986 with 10th-round TKO of Alfredo Layne and defended the title 12 consecutive times before he was stripped of it in 1991. Won the IBF belt later in 1991 with a 12-round win over Tony "The Tiger" Lopez. Retired in 1995 with a record of 45-1-3 and 21 KOs.

    "MYSTERIOUS" BILLY SMITH - Born May 15, 1871, in Little River, Nova Scotia. Turned professional in 1890. Although he had quick hands, Smith was more known for his often blatant disregard for the rules and became known as "The Dirtiest Fighter Who Ever Lived." Held the world welterweight title 1892-1894 and 1898-1900. Retired in 1915. Died Oct. 15, 1937.

    BILLY SOOSE - Born Aug. 2, 1915 in Farrell, Pa. Posted 170 wins in 176 amateur bouts. Soose was a three-time Golden Gloves middleweight champion and U.S. amateur champion. Won the 1937 intercollegiate title at Penn State. Was so dominant that boxing officials passed a law barring Golden Gloves winners from intercollegiate competition, ending his college boxing career. Turned pro in 1938. Won the NYSAC title in 1941. Retired in 1942 with a record of 34-6-1 and 13 KOs. Died Sept. 5, 1998.

    ---

    Source: International Boxing Hall of Fame

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    Re: 2008 HOF Nominees

    I guess it's the "spoilsport-ory" in me which dictates I point out that Paul Gallico -- who created the Golden Gloves and wrote the novel basis for one of my favorite films ever (THE POSEIDON ADVENTURE) -- later changed his mind about boxing and stated publically that he never knew of one individual who was made better by participating in the sport.

    Maybe he carried a grudge against Dempsey into his old age? PeteLeo.

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    Nice one.

    Some fine fighters here, but this class could be stronger.

    I guess we could point out who SHOULD be on the nominee list to the Hall.

    Again.

    Hawk

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    Re: 2008 HOF Nominees

    I will be the last to knock someone else's choice for the Hall of Fame .
    But I must agree with Pete in the sense that there are a few writers that
    deserve to be inducted before Gallico. I don't believe your fame outside boxing should play a part in the decision. Writers like Lardner, Edgren, and of course Hype Igoe in my opinion have a much greater body of work for boxing.
    Paul's whole sports writing career was only from 1920's when he got knocked
    out by Dempsey to 1938 when he wrote " A Farewell to Sports". His claims to fame were sparing with Dempsey, and starting the Golden Gloves [ which if I read it right was done to help sell newspapers, and then took on a life of its own]. Then take Hype for example. He never said farewell to boxing. His career started in the 1890's and ran till 1945 when he died. He saw every champion from Sullivan to Louis. He managed Stanley Ketchel, was PR for many fighters including two of the most enduring names in boxing Ketchel, and Dempsey. You almost can't tell a boxing story without including something about Hype's involvement. It was Hype and Runyon who as a joke convinced Kearns Gallico could box and was a plant. So Kearn's told Dempsey not to play around with him. When Dempsey was knocked out of the ring by Firpo. Hype was one of the writers that pushed him back in. Hype was one of the writers to plead for Jeffries to make a come back and regain the crown. When Louis lost to Schmeling he blamed it on playing golf instead of training. It was Hype he was playing with. Hype remarked he was glad when Blackburn came to bring Joe back to camp. Hype was up two bucks. Hype was a founding father of the BWAA, President, and board member till his death. He helped break the color line for Black reporters. Sadly for Hype his only claim to fame was boxing. I believe the Hall is doing a fine job in getting the "Old Guard" in. It just seems to be easier if you are famous for other reasons as well.

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    Re: 2008 HOF Nominees

    IT KILLS ME to read 'Wilfredo Benitez' on the Canizales bio. Kills in a death way.

    THE SOURCE OF THE ARTICLE IS THE HALL ITSELF .. the brains who preside over the process that decides who gets in.

    No one caught that?

    Sloppy, and at worse, ignorant.

  9. #129
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    Re: 2008 HOF Nominees

    List could be a bit stronger, and I agree about Hype.

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    Re: 2008 HOF Nominees

    Someone thinks Canizalez fought Benitez? Are you kidding me?

    There was a post on this thread about Junior Jones and Canizalez.
    As to that just wanted to mention briefly,

    Canizalez was a great fighter with an impressive record. His cornermen made ridiculous and I do mean ridiculous tantrums when judges, refs or anyone did not do their bidding.

    I refereed Canizalez when he lost 10 out of 12 rounds to Junior Jones in MSG on one judges card he lost 118-109, the next judge had him losing 117-111, and the judge they insisted on bringing from Texas gave Canizalez the fight 119-109. HBO had him winning only 2 or 3 rounds. I had him losing 9 out of 12.

    The films of the entire fight show an average fight with no excessive holding or any major fouls, just Jones outfighting him inside and outside.

    I congratulate him on his acceptance, very scrappy little fighter.

    Does anyone think Leroy Neiman deserves to be in the Boxing Hall of Fame?

  11. #131
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    Vasquez. Benitez.

    What's the difference?

    It's only boxing. No need to make sure you get names and facts correct.

    Way to go IBHOF.

    Sigh.

    Hawk

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    This appears to be a press release from the IBHOF

    But the IBHOF has already made the correction on thier site.

    That's embarrassing.

    You don't see Canton sending out Press releases saying Eric Dickinson was inducted the the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

    Or Cooperstown saying Red Sox Outfielder John Rice just missed the necessary votes for Induction into the Base ball Hall of Fame.

    Even sadder is there were probably only a handful who new any better when they read Canizales's profile.

    Hawk

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    Re: 2008 HOF Nominees

    Well about time Billy Smith made it to the hall. A forgotting fighter, but still a great fighter.

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    Re: 2008 HOF Nominees

    As I said on another forum, there's something wrong when guys like Mitchell and Canizales get in the Hall and fighters like Lionel Rose, Johnny Famechon, Howard Winstone, Santos Laciar, Davey Moore etc. don't even get on the list for contention for the HOF.

    Not saying that Mitch and Cani don't belong (they pass the Ingo, McGuigan, Zaragoza test) but surely there's more pressing inclusions to be made than those two.

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    Re: 2008 HOF Nominees

    Lloyd Marshall gets screwed again because today's boxing writers don't know him from Thurgood Marshall. How do Canizales and Mitchell get in and Davey Moore is not even on the ballot? Today's writers probably think I'm talking about Davey Moore, the junior middle who lost to Duran. I credit the Hall for Bivins and Holman Williams and Burley and Kid Norfolk but, surely, they have missed the boat on Lloyd Marshall. And why in the world is Top Rank matchmaker Bruce Trampler not on the ballot? He has made Bob Arum look good for more than two decades and before that he worked with Teddy Brenner at MSG.

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    Re: 2008 HOF Nominees

    I agree that Lloyd Marshall should get in, but I also wish that Earnie Shavers was also in the International Boxing Hall of Fame also. I don't understand why not.

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    Re: 2008 HOF Nominees

    Dont belive Shavers should NOT get in, he is mostly known for loseing the big fights, Ali, Holmes, ete. He did not do anything to get into the hall imo.

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    Bump

    Given Recent HOF talk.

    Specifically posts #43, 45, 50 and 52, by moi.

    Man I am lazy.

    Hawk
    Last edited by hawk5ins; 02-08-2009 at 09:01 PM.

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    Re: 2008 HOF Nominees

    Larry Holmes is maybe the only true alltime great on this list. Only the true greats can pick themselfs off the canvas to come back to win. I can only think of two who was better than Larry Holmes on my alltime HW list.

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