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Thread: No Link Between Amateur Boxing, Long-Term Brain Damage

  1. #1
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    No Link Between Amateur Boxing, Long-Term Brain Damage

    No Link Between Amateur Boxing, Long-Term Brain Damage


    FRIDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- There's no strong
    evidence linking amateur boxing with long-term brain
    injury, according to a team of sports doctors and
    clinical academics who've reviewed 36 studies on the
    issue.

    Of those studies, 15 (42 percent) concluded that there
    was some sign of boxing-related chronic brain injury
    in at least some boxers. However, the quality of
    evidence in these studies was poor, the review authors
    noted. Of 17 better quality studies included in the
    review, only four (24 percent) found any indication of
    chronic brain injury in a minority of boxers.

    Overall, studies that identified a possible link
    between amateur boxing and long-term brain injury were
    of poorer quality and design, said a team led by Dr.
    Mike Loosemore of the Olympic Medical Institute at
    Northwick Park Hospital, Harrow, U.K. Few of the
    studies were of sufficient quality to conclude
    anything other than a weak association, the
    researchers noted.

    The review was published online Friday in the British
    Medical Journal.

    There is ongoing debate about the safety of amateur
    boxing, which is growing in popularity, noted the
    review authors, who said they did not seek to endorse
    or oppose the sport.

    In an accompanying editorial, University of Melbourne
    neurologist and sports physician Paul McCrory
    suggested that boxers now have shorter careers and
    reduced exposure to repetitive head trauma, making it
    less likely that they'll develop long-term brain
    injury.

    More information

    The American Association of Neurological Surgeons has
    more about sports-related head injuries.

  2. #2
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    Re: No Link Between Amateur Boxing, Long-Term Brain Damage

    Interesting and uplifting article. Of course, the positive findings on the medical front were far and away the best part of the article, but it was also nice to read that amateur boxing is growing in popularity again. PeteLeo.

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    Re: No Link Between Amateur Boxing, Long-Term Brain Damage

    I love boxing but if you think being hit in the head doesn't damage the brain then you must have been hit pretty hard already yourself.

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    Re: No Link Between Amateur Boxing, Long-Term Brain Damage

    It has to have some impact and I certainly wouldn't agree with the report completely.
    Saying that, the amateur scene is so well regulated and protected. I think
    the standards are very high and the use of the headgear alone is a great
    advantage in reducing the effects of hard head shots...

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    Re: No Link Between Amateur Boxing, Long-Term Brain Damage

    I would imagine that shorter bouts and the "points" scoring system reduce the physical damage as opposed to, say, professional boxing, but yeah, it's kind of hard to believe that getting hit in the head -- headgear or no -- doesn't have long-term health effects. This study has a whiff of denial to it.

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    Re: No Link Between Amateur Boxing, Long-Term Brain Damage

    I would go so far as to say that even sparring, which is quite intense
    in the amateur and pro game, has to have effects on a persons brain.
    In sparring, you are wearing bigger headgears generally, and heavier
    gloves. So it's sparring and actual competitive fighting combined. I wonder did the report
    take this into account?

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    Re: No Link Between Amateur Boxing, Long-Term Brain Damage

    I say look at Meldrick Taylor, Ali, Thomas Hearns....etc...

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    Re: No Link Between Amateur Boxing, Long-Term Brain Damage

    Of course, all of those guys had extensive pro careers, too. PeteLeo.

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    Re: No Link Between Amateur Boxing, Long-Term Brain Damage

    I'd like to see a study focusing on just the KO victims of Teofilo Stevenson. We'd see whether getting one's bell rung, often with just one or two punches, leaves a lasting effect. Probably not all of his opponents went on to pro careers, in which case a true amateurs-only study could be done.

    I'd guess these opponents do have brain damage; hope I'm wrong.

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    Re: No Link Between Amateur Boxing, Long-Term Brain Damage

    Headgear would have no effect on the brain being bounced around in the cranium by a punch, which is what produces dementia.

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    Re: No Link Between Amateur Boxing, Long-Term Brain Damage

    I thought brain damage was from feints so this is all news to me

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