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Thread: Pacquiao-Barrera II Predictions, Results, and Discussion 10/6/07

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    Re: Pacquiao-Barrera II Results & Discussion 10/6/07

    Quote Originally Posted by hagler04

    Worst top dollar PPV?? I thought this was a helluva lot more entertaining than Oscar-Tito or Lewis-Holyfield I.
    That's debatable.

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    Re: Pacquiao-Barrera II Results & Discussion 10/6/07

    I thought Barrera did quite well for himself.

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    Re: Pacquiao-Barrera II Results & Discussion 10/6/07

    Quote Originally Posted by Zevl
    Thanks guys, means alot coming from the likes of you.



    BTW, I haven't been on the board much lately, and noticed the news of your induction, Frank. I'm very happy for you. Congrats, it is very well deserved!
    Thanks Zev for the congrats.

    Frank

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    Re: Pacquiao-Barrera II Results & Discussion 10/6/07

    Barrera did well but it unfortunately for us it was apparent early he did not want to engage in a war with Pac. Barrera would have always have problems with Pac's style & speed at any point in his career IMO. I think this is what the first fight would have looked like had Barerra the normal training camp he usually does.

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    Re: Pacquiao-Barrera II Results & Discussion 10/6/07

    Barrera’s Beautiful Mind

    By Bart Barry

    It really was Marco Antonio Barrera’s last fight. After an early career marked by reckless exchanges with all comers and a late career marked by careful exchanges with well-selected comers, sometime in the last month Barrera decided he could do it no longer. He was bored with the routine and finished with the fight game. Just in time, too.

    Saturday night, before 10,112 impassioned Mexican and Filipino fans, Barrera made his final stand against Manny Pacquiao – a man rightfully considered one of the world’s two best prizefighters. The event was promoted as “Will to Win,” but there was a simpleton’s irony in that. “Will to Hear the Final Bell” or “Will to Earn a Last Paycheck” would have been more apt.

    Barrera knew it. When the judges’ scorecards all favored Pacquiao – 118-109, 118-109 and 115-112 – Barrera offered little more than a cry of “¡Viva Mexico!” and a defiant smile, marking the end of his prizefighting career.

    For Oscar de la Hoya, Barrera’s promoter, there was sadness at the press conference afterwards. Barrera had become an overqualified employee in De la Hoya’s company, a guy who was too smart for the corporation, quietly resenting each new workday and the boss who caused it. Still, De la Hoya’s eyes glistened as Barrera spoke. Barrera’s didn’t, though.

    After De la Hoya and co-promoter Bob Arum finished some dull rhetorical flourishes and a competition for Most Sincere Promoter, Barrera shuffled to the podium in a polo shirt and dark jeans. He spoke first in unbecoming English. Then, formalities completed, he spoke eloquently to his Mexican countrymen in Spanish.

    “It is time to say goodbye to this beautiful sport. But if I could be reborn, again I would want to be a fighter.”

    There was, as always, a pattern to the cadence of Barrera’s Spanish delivery. Probably nothing marked Barrera’s career better than patterns, his and his astute recognition of others’. Pattern recognition, finally, is the measure of human intelligence. And there may not have been a more intelligent prizefighter in this era.

    After making action fights through his first seven years, and winning and defending a world title, Barrera lost twice to Junior Jones and changed his style. He underwent surgery to place a protective metal plate on his skull, told no one, then moved forward with his career and began to calculate. At a crossroads fight two years later, he lost to Erik Morales in a rabid spectacle that made both men boxing immortals.

    A career-defining victory would come 14 months later, when Barrera did the world a favor and embarrassed Naseem Hamed into effective retirement. Next came two monumental victories over Morales. And then came business decisions and insincerity and a practical abandonment of his crowd-pleasing style.

    But Barrera knew how much he’d done and how long he could glide on past achievements. He began to fight enough to decision opponents. Then he began to box 30 seconds of each round and expect sympathetic judging – he was, after all, the great Mexican warrior Barrera, and favorable judging was his due.

    He lost a decision to Juan Manuel Marquez in March and chastised his promoter for not ensuring that scorecards came out the right way. Then he signed to fight Pacquiao, pound-for-pound the most feared puncher in the world. Another calculation for Barrera – the recognition of another pattern.

    In Pacquiao, Barrera had a fine opponent for his purposes. Pacquiao’s power was so ballyhooed that Barrera could do nothing to win and still receive accolades for surviving. And if perchance Pacquiao landed a straight left hand and put the lights out for Barrera, the end would be quick and comparatively painless.

    There was not a Barrera-initiated exchange, all Saturday night. He jabbed and circled and discouraged Pacquiao’s lust for contact. When Pacquiao lunged forward and hurt him, Barrera fought maniacally for a second or two – or until he could tie Pacquiao up.

    For a second consecutive fight, Pacquiao was not his sharpest. His talents are sensational enough that even at 75 percent – roughly where Pacquiao was Saturday – he has enough to shut-out a future hall of famer. But at the start of the championship rounds, when Judge Tom Shreck bizarrely had the bout even, Pacquiao’s legs were not strong.

    If ringside observers noted this, surely Barrera did too. But pressing the action and attempting to stop Pacquiao was never in Barrera’s plans. The retirement party Barrera threw for himself held no place for such self-endangering bravado.

    Barrera fought the last two rounds the way he fought the first 10, doing enough to keep Pacquiao from hurting him badly but otherwise committing no more than 30 seconds of each stanza to punching. When the final bell rang, Barrera strolled to his corner and had to be reminded to raise his hands and act like he’d won.

    In the press room afterwards, Pacquiao helped join in the accounts of Barrera’s great showing and greater career. For having been across from Barrera for 36 minutes of combat, though, Pacquiao seemed unconvinced by his own testimony. He kindly embraced Barrera, who’d fouled him a number of times during the fight – including an egregious hitting-on-the-break episode that cost Barrera a meaningless, and unmarked, point in the 11th round – and congratulated him.

    Then a spellbound De la Hoya returned to the podium and said, “Who thought Barrera could go 12 rounds with Pacquiao? But that’s what Barrera’s about!”

    And of course that was all wrong. Going 12 rounds, while losing 11 of them, was never what Barrera was about.

    For many years, by allowing his glistening brain to be sloshed against his cranium for others’ entertainment, Barrera was about giving fans more than they deserved. But finally, by continuing to overpay for tickets and telecasts that featured uninspired performances, fans were starting to give Barrera more than he deserved. Barrera knew this and left just in time. Adios, campeón.

    STEVEN LUEVANO VS. ANTONIO DAVIS
    In a technically proficient but less than enthralling performance, Steven Luevano (34-1, 15 KOs) successfully defended his WBO featherweight title against Antonio Davis (24-4, 12 KOs) in Saturday’s final undercard bout, winning a unanimous decision by scores of 119-108, 119-108 and 118-109.

    As a southpaw who throws all his punches correctly and employs good defense, Luevano is not easily unsettled. But it may have been Luevano’s choice to settle for a decision victory, rather than pressing for a knockout, that occasionally displeased his Mandalay Bay crowd.

    At various unprompted moments throughout the fight, the Events Center filled with impassioned chants of “Pacquiao! Pacquiao!” and “Barrera! Barrera!” – two fighter who were still warming-up in the dressing room and 45 minutes from entering the actual ring.

    LIBRADO ANDRADE VS. YUSAF MACK
    Librado Andrade just can’t help himself; he loves the contact too much. It was another all-action and no-defense battle Saturday night when Andrade (26-1, 20 KOs) went to work on Yusaf Mack (23-2-2, 14 KOs) in a USBA super-middleweight title scrap that was great while it lasted – which it did till 2:34 of round 7. Andrade’s punch tally and Mack’s fatigue then combined to give Andrade his 20th career knockout.

    Andrade’s evening, however, was not without its travails. In the fight’s first 90 seconds, Mack caught him, hurt him and dropped him. In the second round, too, Mack landed the more effective punches. But soon after that, Andrade’s strength, and obscene willingness to receive massive shots from an opponent he’s pursuing, brought an end to the carnage.

    In fewer than 21 minutes of action, Andrade managed to throw 596 punches and land 209. That work rate, when combined with Andrade’s chin, has been, and will continue to be, simply too much for any but the world’s very best super-middleweights.

    “The champion came out of me,” Andrade said in the ring after the fight. “It’s such a beautiful, sweet feeling.”

    For Andrade, a sweet person with a style that is anything but beautiful, then, a lucrative career as a prizefighter continues to be fashioned. And such couldn’t be happening to a better guy.

    FRANCISCO BOJADO VS. STEVE FORBES
    Saturday night also brought the latest installment in a saga called “Panchito’s Squandering of Bojado’s Talent.” After failing to come within three pounds of the junior-welterweight limit of 140 pounds at Friday’s weigh-in, Francisco “Panchito” Bojado (18-3, 12 KOs) entered the ring in his latest attire – a skeleton mask taken from some unlucky trick-or-treater – and a lot of excess weight. Then he got outhustled and outboxed en route to a split-decision loss: 96-94, 94-96, 93-97.

    Steve Forbes (33-5, 9 KOs), meanwhile, came in with a serious expression on his face, a serious plan and serious conditioning to back it up. From the second round onwards, two things were apparent: Bojado was the more talented prizefighter, and Forbes was the more professional. Before the third stanza was a third complete, Bojado’s red and white and green mouthpiece was visible – proving the lack-of-conditioning hypothesis launched at Friday’s weigh-in.

    Probably no single round served as a better metaphor for Bojado’s career than the sixth did. In the opening 30 seconds of the stanza, Bojado tore out of his corner and threw one amazing combination after another. His feet beneath him and his punches properly leveraged, Bojado was a joy to behold. Then he was winded. His mouthpiece thrust all the way out his mouth, Bojado next ate seven unreciprocated right uppercuts and ultimately lost the round.

    Afterwards, an elated Forbes would say, “I was landing the uppercut all night long, and it felt great to land that shot.” Forbes was right about the uppercut, and it was right for him to win the match.

    UNDERCARD
    In off-television action, bout number three saw Golden Boy Promotions junior-lightweight prospect Vicente Escobedo (15-1, 11 KOs) square off with Mexico City’s Miguel Angel Munguia (15-7-1, 13 KOs) in an eight-round junior-lightweight tilt that Escobedo won easily, and unsurprisingly, by unanimous-decision scores of 78-74, 78-74 and 80-72. Despite continuing under the tutelage of legendary Mexican trainer Nacho Beristain, Escobedo has thus far failed to develop into all that Golden Boy Promotions hoped he’d become. His reign of ordinariness continued Saturday night.

    The second match of the evening, Filipino southpaw Michael Farenas (18-2, 16 KOs) versus Tijuanese Arturo Valenzuela (19-9, 17 KOs), was a featherweight mismatch that found Farenas looking much like his countryman and main-event phenomenon Manny Pacquiao, as Farenas easily ran through Valenzuela. Farenas had quickness and power on his side, and Valenzuela showed early and often that he had no solution for Farenas’ straight left hand – getting himself stopped at 0:59 of round 2.

    Saturday night’s action began at the Mandalay Bay Events Center round 4:15 PM local time and featured California featherweight Alejandro Perez (11-0, 6 KOs) and Mexico’s Jaime Villa (5-3, 2 KOs). Despite some initially effective flurries by Villa, Perez was possessed of too much class for the outgunned Mexican, stopping Villa with a body shot at 0:27 of round 5 – after dropping him with a similar left hook at the end of round 4.

    For full coverage of the post-fight press conference, check back with 15Rounds.com on Monday.


    Bart Barry can be reached at: bbarry@15rounds.com.
    Last edited by kikibalt; 10-08-2007 at 01:43 AM.

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    Re: Pacquiao-Barrera II Results & Discussion 10/6/07

    Manny Pacquiao Dominates and Ends the Career of Marco Antonio Barrera
    By Dan Hernandez (At Ringside)-October 7, 2007
    Ringside Report.com

    “I was sad because I lost the fight, but he never really hurt me…I didn’t even think he landed that many punches.” -- Marco Antonio Barrera

    Last night at the Mandalay Bay Events Center, in Las Vegas, Nevada, Manny Pacquiao, 45-3-2, 34 KO’s, defeated Marco Antonio Barrera, 63-6, 42 KO’s, over the course of 12 hard fought rounds. RSR had the fight in favor of the “Pacman” eight rounds to four, or 116-112. Manny won most of the exchanges, was always the aggressor and landed the more telling blows. Nonetheless, it was great to watch. Rounds four, five, and six were old-fashioned donnybrooks, and every round was filled with explosive tension.

    Barrera, a master technician, held his ground beautifully and countered effectively, however, he seemed content to allow Pacquiao to set the pace and dictate the offense. Pacquiao handled his position as the aggressor and appeared confident of victory. There were few dissenters in the pro-Barrera audience. “It was a good fight, and it was different from the first fight,” Pacquiao said. “He’s a good, smart boxer; I’m satisfied with the result. I knew he would have to box me this time around.” Barrera said: “I was sad because I lost the fight, but he never really hurt me…I didn’t even think he landed that many punches.”

    Barrera was incorrect. The punch stats showed Pacquiao landing 256 punches to Barrera’s 120. Pacquaio also more than doubled the power shots landed with a 54% connection, with Barrera registering 34%. “I was surprised he (Barrera) lasted the way he did, “said Pacquiao’s Trainer, Freddie Roach. “He has a lot of heart and guts. He fought a great fight. Manny boxed well. He showed good footwork, cutting off and moving him (Barrera) to the right. When he did that, it was beautiful.”

    The only real controversy came in the eleventh round after Pacquiao had opened a cut below Barrera’s eye during an exchange. The fighters clinched soon after and as Referee Tony Weeks stepped in to break to break up the fighters, Barrera staggered Pacquiao with an overhand right. Weeks penalized Barrera one point for the infraction. Barrera complained later that it was not an illegal blow and that the point should not have been deducted. Marco Antonio is still a great fighter, but again I disagree with him. In addition, most of the audience of over ten thousand people roared their disapproval of the infraction. After a minute or so of recovery, they resumed fighting for a very short while until the bell ended the round.

    Round twelve was uneventful other than Barrera showed a little more aggressiveness and Pacquaio still managing to win the stanza on aggressiveness, and overall effective punching. Both men bore the welts and bruises of a well-fought encounter.

    Manny Pacquaio retained his International Super Featherweight Championship and Marco Antonio Barrera stated that this was unequivocally his last fight and that he continues no more in this sport that he loves. He had announced this decision prior to the match.

    Much honor was bestowed on Barrera at the post-fight interview. Everyone from Oscar De La Hoya to Bob Arum proclaimed Barrera as one of the greatest fighters of recent times and thanked him for all of his contributions. Barrera took this all in stride as he proudly held his beautiful daughter in his lap.

    The rest of the card was well represented with featherweight Alejandro Perez improving has record to, 11-0, 5 KO’s, with a six round decision over Jaime Villa, 5-3, 2 KO’s. Featherweight Michael Farenas, 18-2, 16 KO’s, looked particularly sharp in stopping Arturo Valenzuela, 19-9, 17 KO’s, and Vicente Escobedo, 15-1, 11 KO’s, won a decision over Miguel Angel Munguia, 15-7-1, 13 KO’s, in a junior lightweight affair. Steve Forbes, 32-5, 9 KO’s, looked very sharp in winning over Francisco Bojado, 18-3, 12 KO’s, by ten round decision.

    Librado Andrade, 26-1, 20 KO’s, got off the canvass to knock out Yusaf Mack, 23-2-2, 14 KO’s, in 7 rounds, and win the vacant USBA Super Middleweight Title. A terrific fight. And, Steven Luevano 34-1, 15 KO’s, decisioned Antonio Davis, 24-4, 12 KO’s, to retain his WBO World Featherweight Championship.

    It was a great night of boxing. All involved should be proud.

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    It was funny

    I am a huge Fan of Marco's and I vowed not to let my heart dictate my feelings for this bout.

    I saw the price tag a few weeks ago and said to myself I could wait a week.

    I saw the HBO prefight special and admitedly and stupidly, I started having "gut feelings" about the fight.

    He is my favorite active fighter, how could I live with myself if he pulled off the upset and I missed it?

    So at around 10:00 pm, after the wife went to bed, I flipped a coin as to whether I would buy it or not. Heads I do. Tails I don't. It was tails. So I figured I better make it two of three, just to be safe. Heads won out.

    I go and ordered it and within the first 10 mins of watching it (admitedly, during the prelims, I was flipping back and forth between LSU Florida, USC Stanford and the PPV telecast), they go to Marco in his dressing room and I saw his soft midsection. Granted Marco never was "ripped" ala Manny, but this made my heart sink.

    "Well, there goes that $55.00, I said to myself."

    SO the fight starts, and Manny is more respectful than I expected him to be and Marco is creating angles and boxing well. He's just not throwing enough.

    So there goes my optimism, yet agian. But it didn't last. By round 5 I realized that this was the way it was going to be. Marco being cagey, but simply not able to do enough to win the bout. ANd this is odd becuase after 5, I had Marco only behind by a single point.

    The bout was NOT good. It was NOT entertaining. ULtimately, it was a waste of my money and dissappointing middle to a lost sports weekend for me (Every team I wanted to win, lost. Everyone of my teams, the Louisville Cardinals, St. Louis Rams, lost. My favorite fighter's career ended on a bad note. My favorite Baseball player's career ended after three mediocre innings. It all just sucked.).

    I wish Marco the best in what ever he does from here on out. But after seeing him Saturday night, I pray that it is not inside the ring ever again.

    Adios Marco!

    Hawk

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    Re: Pacquiao-Barrera II Results & Discussion 10/6/07

    Wow, I seem to be the only one thinking it was a good scrap. Rounds 8-12 were pretty disappointing but I thought the first 7-8 rounds were everything you'd hope for. It seems like Barrera doing anything less but pulling a Nigel Benn-Iran Barkley on Pacquaio would have let down most of the public . . .
    Last edited by hagler04; 10-08-2007 at 04:08 PM.

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    Re: Pacquiao-Barrera II Results & Discussion 10/6/07

    Wow, I seem to be the only one thinking it was a good scrap. Rounds 8-12 were pretty dissapointing but I thought the first 7-8 rounds were everything you'd hope for. It seems like Barrera doing anything less but pulling a Nigel Benn-Iran Barkley on Pacquaio would have let down most of the public . . .

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    Re: Pacquiao-Barrera II Results & Discussion 10/6/07

    i did not pay because i saw this as marco-juarez II all over again. the bucket had it right at the top of this thread....marco is not getting better and he AIN'T getting killed! that was his fight plan.

    hawk....you are a good writer.
    greg

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    Re: Pacquiao-Barrera II Results & Discussion 10/6/07

    I found this without a by-line.

    Barrera vs Pacquiao

    I know Marco Antonio Barrera lost the fight last Saturday to Manny Pacquiao, but unlike Larry Merchant and the rest of the HBO cast, I thought given the circumstances; his age, his past wars, his battle weariness, he did what he could. His game plan was to take Pacquiao the distance and out box him, at those times when he took a stand against Paquiao he fared fairly well. We all knew it would be an up hill battle for Barrera, a tough mountain to climb. He failed. There is no shame in that.

    Am I the only one that thought Pacquiao was hamming it up when Barrera popped him with a right hand just as referee Tony Weeks was calling a break? The point deduction was unwarranted, a warning would have sufficed. It would not have made a difference
    on the scorecards, but if Paquiao was as hurt as he seemed to be, and if Weeks had let the fight continue, we might have seen a different ending. Or is it just me?

    I was appalled by Larry Merchants line of questioning when he was interviewing Barrera after the fight. He seemed to be trying his best to take the last shred of dignity from a great, but aging warrior. Barrera, to his credit, didn't bite and remained unbowed.

    To Larry Merchant and others who choose to judge fighters from the comfort of a ringside seat, or perhaps an easy chair in the den, beer in hand, watching the fight on television with some buddies, I give you the following.........

    ........It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbled, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs and comes up short again and again; who knows the great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best, knows in the end the triumph of high achievement and who, at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those timid souls who know neither victory or defeat........Anonymous

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    Funny thing is

    I almost got the impression that Merchant and Lampley were going out of their way to ensure that they weren't over praising Barrera as they have done and been accused of doing so many times in the past.

    I am a Huge Barrera fan and the fight was pretty unsightly to watch.

    I was not happy with the line of questioning that Larry did in the post fight interview, but he did finally show some consistancy in criticizing Marco's tactical game plan, that Larry has never had a problem with critiqueing others for doing exactly the same thing.

    I too would have liked Larry to have eased off the gas a bit, but to ME, it seemed as if Larry were trying to appease HIS own critics in showing he'll ask ANYONE tough questions, even those he has CLEARLY shown some favoritism in the past towards.

    Hawk

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    Manny Pacquiao – Marco Antonio Barrera II: Behind the Scenes

    Article & Photos by Dan Hernandez-October 16, 2007
    Ringside Report.com

    Famed boxing analyst and radio host Rich Marrota looked me straight in the eye and said “Hi.” I knew at once “I was in the right place, I belonged.” -- Dan Hernandez

    I left from Los Angeles, California, to Las Vegas, Nevada, at 9:30 AM on Saturday, October 6, 2007. My destination was the Mandalay Bay Casino and Resort, my purpose, to view the fight card starring Manny Pacquiao, defending his International Super Featherweight Championship against former titleholder and future boxing Hall of Fame resident, Marco Antonio Barrera. It was worth driving the five hours. I had a great time… As previously reported, Pacquiao won in a decisive 12 round contest; however, the journey prior to the fight is my focus with this article.

    Having experienced boxing events as a fan since I was a child was really no preparation for attending as a member of the press. When my Managing Editor Geno McGahee stated that I was approved to go to the fight but wasn’t sure exactly where I was to pick up my media credentials, and told me to, “just ask.” I was struck with terror. The fear of the unknown had gotten to me.

    My fears were unfounded. After I fumbled about for the word for writers, press, media, etc., a very nice, very patient attendant said, “Do you need to get your credentials?” I responded affirmatively and was pointed in the right direction. I gave my name to a person at the desk and showed my identification. She said, “Here you are.” Checking a typed roster where my name was written as a last minute inclusion. She then told me to stand at another desk (bar) and check in. They would take my picture, since I had never covered a fight at this locale before, and provide me with my credentials. They could probably tell that I had never covered any fight before.

    As I entered the Events Center, my credentials, which were proudly worn around my neck, were observed by the people taking the tickets. They said, “Welcome, have a good time.” I mustered enough confidence to request, “Where can I go with this pass?” I was told, “Anywhere.” Wow, anywhere. What does that mean? There were seat assignments. I chose to start there.

    The usher escorted me to my seat. I told her that some other name was on the back of the seat. She said, “Don’t worry about it. It‘s the correct seat” It was not consequential at that time since the entire arena was fairly empty, it was only 3 PM! Since I could go anywhere, I wandered around the Center and saw quite a few snack bars and the Tecate girls. Somehow, anywhere was not anything special. I could do this without a pass. I observed the first preliminary at 4 PM. An entertaining fight that I was pleasantly surprised started so early.

    Feeling a little adventurous, I walked around a bit and asked an official looking person what anywhere meant. She said that I should speak with Jimmy. I did and Jimmy took me away from the maddening crowd into an elevator down to the bottom floor and the “media room.” Jimmy looked at me as if to say, “Go play,” and said, “There it is” and left. Slowly I entered an area heretofore unbeknownst to me and treaded softly.

    There was a whir of word processors and computers and seemingly more people here than in the arena up to that point. Suddenly, 3 feet in front of me speaking to a couple of people he seemed to know, HBO commentator, Larry Merchant was holding court. He was not super imposed or on tape…he was just one of the guys, except he was in a tux. A few minutes later, Rich Marotta, famed boxing analyst and radio host, strolled through the room. He looked me straight in the eye and said, “Hi.” I knew at once that I was in the right place. I belonged.

    Getting comfortable, I traveled up and down that special elevator to the media room, then to the photographers special area and back. Anywhere had become larger in scope and I liked it. The elevator could be self-operated but they had a young lady greeting people and pushing the right buttons. I asked her if she was able to view any of the events and she said: “no, but I see everyone.” She also owned up to the fact that after doing that all evening she would become a little stir crazy. Still it was fun and she met a lot of nice people. She also told me that she had been a “ring girl” in California and that she was very thin at that time because “the crowds were ruthless and booed you if you jiggled in the wrong places even a little bit.” A distinguished looking gentleman traveling the elevator with me looked a little frazzled, laughed and said: “When your wife is an important member of the boxing commission, she gets the best seats and forgets about him.” I wished him well in correcting that situation.

    A man came in and said it was his name on my seat and his assigned numbers took precedence. The usher said take the seat behind the one that I had and “don’t worry about it”

    I ate a hot dog to appease my hunger and temporary confusion when a fellow credentialed person asked: “Why don’t you eat in the media room?” I promptly went back to get my just desserts. Literally.

    Sitting at a table surrounded by my bounty of good food, a pleasant man sat at the table with me and introduced himself. Being the experienced writer that I am, I neglected to write his name on my notepad; however I do remember that he is a writer for a Las Vegas newspaper. A friendly gentleman came to the table and joined us. At least he spoke to me and my new unnamed friend as if we were connected. He was unhappy that his fighter was unable to begin her pro debut on this card as planned. The opponent had come in quite heavy and did not seem prepared to fight.

    Enjoying my meal and the conversation I lost concentration as this beautiful, statuesque woman walked in the room. When she sat at our table, I thought it must be my smile that brought her over. It turns out that the personable man was her manager and she knew the sportswriter and they were trying to set up an interview. This young lady was Ana Julaton a 5’5” female boxer, out of Alameda, California and current San Francisco Golden Glove champion at 126 pounds.

    I also attended the post-fight interview where Oscar De La Hoya, Bob Arum, Manny Pacquaio, Marco Antonio Barrera and the winners of the evening’s fights took their well-deserved bows. I am particularly grateful to RSR to allow me to get my feet wet at such an auspicious event.

  14. #74
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    Re: Pacquiao-Barrera II Results & Discussion 10/6/07

    from espn.com

    Manny Pacquiao's decision against Marco Antonio Barrera in their Oct. 6 rematch at Las Vegas' Mandalay Bay generated a little more than 340,000 buys and nearly $17 million on HBO PPV, multiple industry sources told ESPN.com. The fight also generated a live gate of $2.963 million, according to the Nevada State Athletic Commission.

    Pacquiao co-promoter Bob Arum told ESPN.com that he no longer will allow HBO PPV to release buys for his PPV cards, good or bad.

    The 340,000-plus figure is more than Arum and Golden Boy anticipated when they made the fight. It also sends Barrera into retirement with his best-ever PPV performance. According to HBO PPV figures, Barrera's 2001 fight with Naseem Hamed did 320,000, the third bout with Erik Morales did 310,000 in 2004 and the second fight in 2002 did 300,000.

    For Pacquiao, the figure fell shy of his 2005-06 trilogy with Morales: 350,000 (fight No. 1), 355,000 (No. 2) and 345,000 (No. 3).

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