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Thread: Close Up and Personal: Faces in the Crowd, Pt. 2

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    Re: Close Up and Personal: Faces in the Crowd, Pt. 2

    Hey Juan -- I was browsing some earlier posts -- good work in the blues club. Next time you go with your camera, try setting it on black and white or sepia for a few shots instead of color.

    If you are using a film camera (I still haul around my Nikon-F) try a roll of Kodak black and white -- it can be developed like any color film but gives B&W photos.

    I also carry in my bag a cheap panoramic camera that I take pictures with. (If you dont have one, I have an extra I can send you -- I picked it up for a buck at a thrift store.)

    You may like that look.

    Mike

    ps -- I recall spending over $200 in 1976 for a new lens so I could go to the frazier-foreman bout! What would that be today?

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    Re: Close Up and Personal: Faces in the Crowd, Pt. 2

    Hey --

    A buddy of mine just released his wine -- he has a site up and if anyone is interested you can order online -- by the way there is a boxing connection: he produced the recent Rocy Balboa film:

    http://guyriedelwines.com/index.html

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    Hey Mike

    Hi Mike,

    Thanks! I appreciate that. I'll have to check the options out regarding color and sepia settings.

    I have no idea what that lens would cost you today, but it can't be cheap, that's for sure!

    I remember my parents bought a six-bedroom house with 3/4 basement and a crawl space off a small pond several blocks away from the prestigious Fremd High School (part of highschool district 211--big bucks) in Palatine, Illinois for $160,000 in 1978 (my father was out of town on business, so a bunch of friends helped my mom, my brothers and I to move on Thanksgiving weekend). When my parents divorced around the year 2000, they sold the house for around $330,000, which was a STEAL for the buyer! I wish I had the money then, because that house has got to be worth well over $400,000 today. But I digress...

    On another note, I'll be at the fights tonight at the Odeum in Villa Park, where I'll be shooting and reporting alongside Laz Izada.

    Have a good one,



    Juan

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    Photos & Report from the Odeum!



    Heavyweight contender, Andrew Golota, mugs for my camera at ringside


    Well, the fights were quite entertaining, although I watched them without my friend, Laz, who got lost en route and decided to go home.

    Here's a link to my fight report which, as you'll see, is chock full of photos:

    Link to Report at the Odeum

    I've still got a few more I wanted to post up, but I'm through for the night!

    Enjoy!



    Juan

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    Cheap Panoramic Camera?

    Hi Mike,

    I just saw that you mentioned you had an extra panoramic camera you'd be willing to send me. Somehow I missed that! Please, do send me one.

    Thanks,


    Juan

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    My Review of 'Resurrecting the Champ' Movie

    I just posted up a review of the movie, Resurrecting the Champ, which is now out on DVD.

    Check it out at the following link:

    'Resurrecting the Champ' Movie Review Link

    Good movie! I liked it a lot. I give it the old "Two Boxing Gloves' Up!"

    Check it out if you get the chance!

    Regards,


    Juan

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    Re: Close Up and Personal: Faces in the Crowd, Pt. 2

    Wow! I just skimmed through this review. Interesting!

    I'll tell you what: It seems I deal with a number of people who completely buy the book's premise.

    BOOKS

    Make Enemies and Alienate People
    A satirical new book serves up a 10-step program on how to be, well … an a--hole

    By Brian Braiker | Newsweek Web Exclusive
    Apr 14, 2008

    Are you a swell guy, everyone's sunken-chested doormat? Maybe you're a pushover of a gal, a tad overeager to please at the expense of your own tepid desires? Saps of the world, rejoice: Martin Kihn has written the book just for you.

    "I was the nicest guy in the world—and it was killing me," he writes in "A$$hole: How I Got Rich and Happy by Not Giving a Damn About Anyone and How You Can Too," his new mock-help masterpiece. "My life was a dictionary without the word 'no.' If you asked me for a favor—even the kind of favor that required me to go so far out of my way that I needed a map, a translator and an oxygen tank—even if I didn't know you that well, I might hesitate a second, but I'd always say yes."

    Until, that is, he realized that he was competing for a promotion with a colleague he refers to as the Nemesis (a text-book a-word). Kihn resolved to "blowtorch away [his] old personality and uncover the rock-hard warrior within." Toward that end he devised a "10-step program to [anus]ism" for anyone wanting to acquaint himself with his inner über-alpha. Kihn, who has written for Spy, the New York Times Magazine and VH1's beloved "Pop-Up Video," calls his hilarious send-up of business culture "office-based satire." Think Dogbert on steroids, munching garlic bagels in public while closing deals on his Bluetooth ear thingy. Kihn recently discussed his new life as a walking, talking sphincter with NEWSWEEK's Brian Braiker. Excerpts:

    NEWSWEEK: Your book seems to be a hit in the U.K., where it came out first.
    Martin Kihn: It was No. 33 at one point. There's been quite a lot of press.

    Well, there are a lot of them in England.
    [Laughs] I can't figure it out. They really seem to get it. It's doing well in Germany, also. I think there's a slightly anti-American flavor in Europe. Maybe this is helping the situation for me: "He's an [fill in family-unfriendly word that NEWSWEEK generally avoids]; he's American. This makes sense."

    In this book you hire an acting coach and a dog whisperer; you have a nemesis competing for a big client. How much is true?
    I would say everything in there happened. It certainly didn't happen in that order. The biggest challenge was the acting coach. He wasn't one person; multiple people were made into one. Also, I have a thing about reimagining. It's not malicious intent, it's just that I can't remember what people say. I'm trying to make it funny, too.

    But you actively went out into the world and tried to be an, uh, aggressively un-nice person?
    Oh sure, absolutely. It started from a really real place where I was actually very serious in the beginning. I had a performance review and it was implied that I was too nice to ever be in charge. It sort of made me sad, to be honest. So I thought, "Why don't I try this experiment." But the original idea was that this would be a serious book: you have to be an [curse word synonymous with "unbelievable jerk" that begins with the letter A] in America, because it came out of being really bitter and enraged. And then it turned funny. I started doing it, and it became ridiculous.

    What did you do out of character that you wouldn't normally have done?
    It's amazing what you can do in New York and not get much of a reaction, like giving people a dollar to insult me right outside Rockefeller Center. Thinking about it ahead of time was a lot more painful than doing it. I cut in line at a hot dog stand. I threw it down and I demanded my money back. There was somebody I had offended in line. The guy wasn't saying anything, but there was a look about him that made me back down immediately. I did return things without a receipt.

    What's the difference between being an [epithet that begins with the first letter of the alphabet] and just a jerk? Where's the line?
    The alpha male is someone like Donald Trump. They're simply decisive, commanding. But they have empathy. And if somebody appeals to them on a human level they'll respond, probably. The [buttocks personified] takes it to the next step: he or she is somebody who literally has no empathy. What I was trying to do in this book was press the point and ask, "How far is too far?" What direction are we going in when we try to out-alpha each other to the extreme? It almost becomes a comical character. It's no longer simple dominance, it's ridiculousness.

    It becomes a caricature.
    Yeah. And the big insight of the whole thing for me is that I was able to adopt a kind of persona that I didn't have. It wasn't really me, but it was a character. And it let me off the hook, because it wasn't really me. We all do that to a certain extent, we do that at the office.

    If Donald Trump is just an alpha male, who are the famous [human derrieres] throughout history?
    There are [scatological body part] philosophers. Everyone says Nietzsche, Machiavelli. But my favorite is Ayn Rand. Everyone really likes her, but if you look at her books it's like an [rectal] manifesto. It's a big ego trip: either you're the special person and you can do literally whatever you want—that is the definition of an [a-hole]—or you're not, in which case you're the victim of one of these people. It's a pretty clear [orifice] worldview. She even had a book called "The Virtue of Selfishness." But my perfect role model is a fictional character, Tony Montana [in "Scarface"]. He was over the top; he was not quite real.

    But now you have a blog where you cite examples of such behavior in the real world.
    Women can be [disagreeable people] too. Heather Mills is a classic. She seems a little unhinged. Everyone thinks of Simon Cowell. Some people have said Rupert Murdoch, but I was on Fox News, so I wouldn't call him an [excretory opening]. There are some timeless [proctological] maneuvers: interrupting, taking credit for everything, claiming every idea you've ever heard as your own—that's the one I like.

    I like interrupting the person talking to you just to assert something that makes absolutely no sense.
    [Laughs] People do that. Neil Cavuto did that on his [Fox News] show! It was pretty funny. He took out his BlackBerry and started looking and he wasn't listening to me. He said, "Oh, uh, I wasn't listening." He didn't say, "Sorry." He was being an [posterior portal]. See?

    What's your take on alternate words, like "a--hat" or "douchebag"?
    [Laughs] I like "d---head," because apparently you can say that on the radio.

    You can?
    That's what I've heard. You can't say [the word we have refrained from printing thus far in this interview] in America, but you can say d---head.

    Yeah, I'm still not sure how we're going to print this interview, to be honest.
    On TV I can say masspole, so I just say masspole the whole time. Or a-hole is all right, or jerk. By the way, the BBC made a new rule for me. I was allowed to say the word [begins with A, you figure it out] after 10 p.m. So I changed history. Me. I'm so proud.

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    Re: Close Up and Personal: Faces in the Crowd, Pt. 2

    Juan -- send me an email at mike@cyberboxingzone.com with your address for the cheap-o but still cool widescreen camera

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    Thanks & Hoosier Time This Saturday Night!

    Thanks, Mike! I sent you an email regarding the widescreen camera.



    By the way, it looks like I'll be back in Indiana this Saturday night for the fights. This time, they're slated for Gary Indiana's Majestic Casino (see the poster above). It should be a good time.

    Well, it's off to work I go!

    Cheers,



    Juan

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    Re: Close Up and Personal: Faces in the Crowd, Pt. 2

    Hey,

    I just spied this interesting article on saving secrets at Yahoo:

    Extreme Savers Share Their Secrets
    by Elaine Appleman Grant
    Tuesday, April 1, 2008


    Lynn Tostado is almost embarrassed about her hobby: "Saving money is, well, a passion of mine," she says. "I've always kept my eyes out for creative ways to stretch a dollar."

    The Dover, N.H., accounting manager had a compelling reason to practice thrift. She spent a decade at home raising her four kids. Then she and her husband put three of them through college simultaneously.

    To read the rest of the article, click on the link below:

    Link to Savers Article

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    Ringside Photo of Yours Truly by Tom Barnes

    Here's a photo that professional photographer and sometimes CBZ contributor Tom Barnes sent me from last Friday's fights in Lake Villa. That's yours truly standing outside the boxing ring's ropes prior to the fights commencing. I was wearing a golden Polo shirt with the insignia of the high school where I teach. As it was a little chilly, I did the layered thing and put on a black golf Polo over it once the fights got started.

    Last edited by Juan C Ayllon; 04-16-2008 at 09:25 AM.

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    Weight Loss Tips!

    Wow! This article at Yahoo caught my interest, as I'm trying to do a little spring cleaning with my bod:

    Lose 10 Pounds in Six Weeks

    Here are five simple food swaps that can help you lose more than 10 pounds in the next six weeks.

    1. Stick to one serving of cereal. For most people, a typical pour of breakfast cereal is equal to two servings. If you're trying to lose weight, trim calories by accurately measuring one serving into your bowl (usually that means ¾ - 1 cup, however, cereal serving sizes vary so you must regularly check the package labeling on your favorite brands and varieties).

    For those who eat a daily bowl of breakfast cereal, follow my lead, and you'll save about 150 calories by cutting back on cereal and at least 50 calories in extra milk every morning. That's 8,400 calories saved and 2.5 pounds lost at the end of six weeks!

    2. Skip your late night snack. We all feel the need to munch in the evening, and although a p.m. snack can be perfectly appropriate (diet-friendly p.m. snacks should not exceed 150 calories), for many people, the evening tends to be the time of day we blow it on calorie overload - comfort food central; ice cream, cookies, potato chips, popcorn and more!

    On average, people gobble down way more than 250 calories after 8 p.m. Exercise some willpower and skip your nighttime snack altogether. Sip an herbal tea, floss/brush your teeth and close down the kitchen for the evening. You'll save at least 250 calories each day and after six weeks, you'll have cut 10,500 calories and dropped three whole pounds!

    3. Scratch the butter/margarine. Cut out a total of one tablespoon of regular butter or margarine from your toast, veggies, potatoes, dinner rolls, etc. each day. At 100 calories per tablespoon, you'll save 4,200 calories and drop over one pound in six weeks. What if you can't give up the butter or margarine? At least switch to a soft tub spread that says "reduced fat" and "trans-fat free" on the label - it's half the calories of the full fat versions, so you'll still drop over ½ pound.

    4. Lose the mayo and cheese on your sandwich Omit the slice of cheese and mayonnaise on your sandwich (use mustard instead - only five calories per teaspoon) and you'll save about 200 calories per sandwich. If you eat a sandwich a day, you'll end up saving 8,400 calories and find yourself 2.5 pounds lighter after just six weeks.

    5. Delete the extras: It's amazing how much extra food we can munch on without realizing it - a grab of this/that off our kid's plate, an extra packet of ketchup or salad dressing, a bite of your co-worker's dessert... before you know it, you've consumed an extra 800 calories!

    Be super mindful and delete the "extras" and you'll be able to trim a significant amount of calories off your weekly total. Also, pay attention to your beverages (alcohol included) - as well as what's going into your coffee and tea. By trimming 1000 extra calories off each week (about 150 per day), you'll save a total of 6000 calories and drop 1.75 pounds at the end of six weeks!

    Link to Article Online

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    Obvious Statement of the Day...

    I was listening to WGCI, an African-American radio station popular with my students during the last class of Word Processing of the day, and I had to laugh and add my own comments to something that the DJ said.

    He was doing a little editorializing and said basically the following to parents of teens:

    If your kid is wearing the same colors every day, and when his friends come over and are always wearing the same colors, too, ther'es a good chance your kid is involved in a gang.
    I added out loud, "Yeah, and if your kid is packing guns all the time, chances are, he's in a gang."

    One of the students smiled.

    Of course, being one to beat a dead horse, I went on: "If your kid's always shooting people and digging up the back yard to bury people, chances are, he's in a gang."


    Yeh. Ohhhhhhhkayyyyyyyy.

    Hey! Thank God it's Friday, eh?
    Last edited by Juan C Ayllon; 04-22-2008 at 06:58 AM.

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    Small Deer at a Neighbor's House



    Here's a photo I snapped the other day of a small deer nibling from a bird feeder in the yard of a neighbor down the street.

    It turned out that there were about five or six in the yard, but they--along with this little one--scattered when I maneuvered closer for a better shot.


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    Duck Lake Waterway Association Meeting Last Night!



    I just attended my first meeting with the Duck Lake Waterway Association. Since I live off Duck Lake, I thought I'd attend and find out more about what's going on.

    It was all right. There was a lot of discussion regarding phosphorus in the lake, which is increased greatly through the use of fertilizer (unless you buy some without phosphorus), leaving lawn clippings or dog waste in your yard, which may wash into the lake with rains, decompose and create more phosphorus which, to my understanding, becomes food for algae which mucks up the lake.

    They also talked at length about the problem with this one kind of water weed (a Japanese variety originally from fish tanks introduced into the lake that was improperly disposed of) which has taken over the lake, and how it will be treated with some special bio-friendly chemicals to kill it, versus cutting and harvesting it. The4 latter is counterproductive, as any parts of the weed that is broken off becomes a new plant.

    Anyways, it looks like I'll be DJ'ing the upcoming annual Duck Lake festival, which is tentatively scheduled for August 2nd. Woo-hoo.

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    Hmmm...Flat Screen TV Anyone?



    Dang! I get these kinds of ads in my email inbox all the time! Definitely catchy, it even makes me want to go out and buy a flat screen TV, or check out their offers. But, geez, what exactly are they selling here anyway?

    Sheesh.

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    Passing of a Childhood Friend's Father

    I just got back home from spending the afternoon with a good friend from childhood, Scott, and his wife, Kerry. Scott's father was in hospice. He suffered from several forms of cancer, was breathing through an oxygen mask, and made a distinctive gurgling sound from his chest as he took frequent, labored breathes, almost as if he was panting in his sleep.

    I hadn't seen Scott's father in about two years and was shocked at how drawn, withered and pale he appeared.


    Scott didn't expect him to last the night, but figured he'd be around for the rest of the evening. He was wrong.

    We visited for about an hour, then left for Scott's house. About an hour or two later, his brother, Ken, called. He'd been informed via phone that their father had passed.

    Kerry, Scott and I went back to the hospice care place and visited with his father. When we walked into the room, his oxygen mask was removed. Now, his skin had a light yellow hue. His eyes remained shut and his mouth agape. There was no wooshing sound of oxigen or a resuscitator. Just the loud banter of a TV news show from the room across the hallway.

    Scott gently touched his fathers shoulder, and bent over to kiss the top if his head. Kerry dabbed at tears in her eyes.

    I left them for a while to have their peace with Scott's father. Later, Ken and his wife joined us. What a somber evening.

    I have a lot of memories of Scott's father from high school age. I remember several times when we were underclassmen at Buffalo Grove High School working out in the lower level of his house and his father arrived home from work. A number of times, he'd interrupted our workout to have Scott rinse the dishes in the sink and put them in the dishwasher.

    Or there was the time we ruined Scott's father's razor shaving the lifelike hair off Scott's G.I. Joe. Nice.

    Scott's father was a good-hearted person.

    Rest in peace,




    Juan
    Last edited by Juan C Ayllon; 04-28-2008 at 07:24 AM.

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    10 Driving No-Nos

    I found the following interesting article online. Wow! Four seconds distance behind someone on unsealed roads. I'd never have thought of that!

    10 Driving No-Nos
    A global guide to some of the most common errors behind the wheel.

    Andrew Ehrenkranz
    Newsweek Web Exclusive
    Updated: 5:50 PM ET Apr 29, 2008

    Bad driving happens everywhere. But for road behavior at its worst, the place to beat is sub-Saharan Africa, where locals are 100 times more likely to die in traffic accidents than Americans. (Indeed, the destructive power of trucks has become so feared in countries like Ethiopia that locals have dubbed the vehicles "Al Qaeda.") Where better, then, for NEWSWEEK's Andrew Ehrenkranz to learn about the biggest mistakes drivers make than on the continent?

    Mick Farmer, a British military veteran and certified police driving instructor, has taught professional drivers and novices across East, West, and Central Africa how to navigate these perilous roads more safely. On a rainy day at his off-road training camp outside Kampala, Uganda, last week, Farmer taught Ehrenkranz and four Ethiopians from the World Bank how to avoid the most common driving errors.

    Don't Go in the Water: If there is any water in the road, check how deep it is before trying to cross. And don't be fooled into thinking that a four-wheel drive truck can act like a duck boat. Whatever those car ads might show, they shouldn't be plunged into water that comes above the knee. Anyone who thinks otherwise should take heed of Farmer's tale about a "puddle" he encountered while leading a food convoy from Mombasa to southern Sudan. The truck drivers, fearful of an ambush, wanted to drive right through it. Farmer insisted on checking-and discovered that the water was so deep that a jeep was submerged in it.

    Keep the Pressure On: Check your tires regularly-underinflated tubes are dangerous. Tires should always be at the pressure specified in your car owner's manual, says Farmer, citing a case in which a driver lost control of his car, killing his diplomat passenger, because the dust cap was missing from a tire valve. "All accidents are chains of events with little links," he says.

    Light It Up: Don't wait for rain or nightfall to turn on your lights. If your car doesn't have daytime running headlights, put them on and keep them on. "Headlights, contrary to the all too common belief I've encountered around Africa, do not affect fuel efficiency," says Farmer. "There's no reason not to keep them on at all times."

    Keep Your Distance: On a tarmac road you should leave at least two seconds between your vehicle and the one in front. On an unsealed road, at least four seconds. The closer you are to the next car's bumper, the higher your chances of getting into accident if you're forced to stop short. "An easy way to calculate this is to pick a landmark, and once the back of the car in front is in line with that landmark, start counting, 'One elephant, two elephant'," says Farmer. Then adjust your distance accordingly.

    Stow It Low: It's always better to stash things inside the car than on the roof. But if you need the extra space, be sure to pack your goods correctly. Objects on the roof negatively affect the vehicle's center of gravity, making the car more unstable and harder to control. Every vehicle has a center point, which is roughly at the top of the gear lever. You want to put the heaviest stuff near the vehicle's center point, toward the middle of the vehicle.

    Find a Focus: Don't get distracted by other people's bad driving habits, says Farmer. "When you become preoccupied with your frustration or find yourself in a temporary fit of road rage, recognize it and do what you need to do to calm down."

    Check Your Vision: Sounds like a no-brainer, but if you can't see you can't drive-and it's more likely you will be a hazard not just to yourself but to other drivers on the road.

    Lose the Ego: "I've had drivers tell me, 'Why should I wear my seatbelt when I am a better driver than anyone else?'" says Farmer. "Needless to say, this is not a good attitude. If you really are so sure that all other drivers are less capable than you are, that's an even better reason to drive slowly and defensively." Multitasking while driving is a no-no for the same reason.

    Slow Down: "Throughout Africa professional drivers are advised to drive fast through hostile areas," says Farmer. "This makes no sense. If, for example, you are fired upon while driving, it is even harder to control the vehicle traveling at a high speed."

    Watch for Animals: "Animals don't walk backward," says Farmer. "If you see an animal in the road and can't fully stop in time, drive to where the animal came from."

    URL: http://www.newsweek.com/id/134775

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    Some Photos from David Diaz's Workout Last Saturday

    Here's some shots I took at Chicago Boxing Club last Saturday, where WBC Lightweight Champion David Diaz was doing some training for his upcoming bout versus Manny Pacquiao on June 28th.



    David Diaz (right) with Rick Ramos at the Chicago Boxing Club



    Diaz's manager and co-trainer, Jim Strickland, looks on as he jumps rope

















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    My Photo on Ted Sares' Site

    Some of you are familiar with Ted Sares' postings in the message board, as well as some of his articles that appear on the CBZ Newswire page. Anyways, he just emailed me with a link to his website, which features a photo of me.

    Here is that link:

    Link to Where My Photo Appears on Ted Sares' Site

    Ted is quite the prolific writer, a terrific guy and very accomplished in his professional life.

    Happy Friday,



    Juan

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    Emminent Economic Crash on the Horizon?

    I was doing a google search on a stock market guru, Robert Prector--who was a much-followed proponent of the Elliot Wave Theory back in the 80s--and found this interesting article that also plugged his new book:

    In this three part interview, Elliott Wave International president Robert Prechter discusses his new book, “Conquer The Crash”: How To Survive and Prosper in a Deflationary Depression.”

    In this three part interview, Elliott Wave International president Robert Prechter discusses his new book, “Conquer The Crash: How To Survive and Prosper in a Deflationary Depression



    Part 1 of Interview

    In your professional career, you’ve made a number of long-term market forecasts that lie far outside of conventional opinion. Is there a reason why you have so often stood outside the crowd?

    I make my forecasts using the Wave Principle. I don’t rely on any data external to the market. I study the charts and interpret the waves as best I can. News is not helpful – in fact, it’s counter-productive. I could do this on a desert island as long as I had access to the charts. This method often places my forecasts outside of public opinion because the majority relies on news, which is always bullish at tops and bearish at bottoms.

    Majority opinion cannot be any other way, because the herding nature of human beings forms a popular consensus, which creates the market’s trends and turns.


    Your first big public forecast was made in 1978 in your book, “Elliott Wave Principle – Key To Market Behavior,” which you wrote with A.J. Frost. Can you tell us more about this forecast and the financial climate that it was made in?

    It’s easy to forget, but the late ‘70s were a period of widespread financial worry. People were fairly resigned to a gloomy view of the stock market and the economy. Inflation and gas prices were skyrocketing, and interest rates were on their way to new all-time highs. Portfolio strategists were calling for the final smash of the secular bear market that began in 1966. A public opinion poll showed that the U.S. public was more negative about “the future” than at any time since the poll’s origination in the 1940s.

    In 1978, the Dow moved as low as 740 but it never came near the 1974 low at 577. In the book, I described, along with A.J. Frost, “the current bull market in stocks…which should accompany a breakout to new all-time highs.”

    Which of course it did.

    Yes. We knew that wave 5 had begun and would overcome the gloom.

    When you called for the Dow to reach as high as 4000, people thought you were crazy – just as some think of you today.

    Who, me?

    You also successfully forecast the crash in 1987, didn’t you?

    Nobody specifically predicted a “crash” before it started, including me. But I did tell people to sell, right when the sentiment indicators showed the majority bullish. In fact, that was one of the reasons I turned cautious. Then the Dow fell 900 points, which back then meant something!

    Haven’t you also nailed gold and silver?

    Yes, for over 20 years. They have been my most consistent markets.

    But allow me to caveat my own track record. In the ‘90s I made the biggest mistake of my career. Even though I predicted that “Investor mass psychology should reach manic proportions” in the stock market, I never imagined that the mania would carry on as long as it did. Wave 5 continued higher throughout the ‘90s, and I got off too early.

    Did that turn you bullish?

    Quite the opposite. I think my basic interpretation of the long-term financial picture is correct. I’m not timing a five or ten-year trend here; I’m attempting to pinpoint the termination of a 200+ year move and a killer bear market. The higher it went, the more bearish I got.

    Let’s talk about your current long-term forecast. You’ve just written a book titled “Conquer The Crash.”

    All signals point to the fact that wave 5, which is the final leg up of our great bull market, topped in early 2000. Mass psychological trends are now fueling a corrective move that will decimate stock prices.

    I believe it’s time for people to prepare for a vast economic disaster, which will include a deflationary crash and an economic depression as bad or worse than the one suffered in the early 1930s.

    When will it begin?


    It is already in progress!

    I’m not sure the world is ready for this.


    Has it ever been? Disasters of this magnitude always catch the general populace off guard. Today is no exception – too few are even remotely prepared for this crash.

    What should we do?

    My book is subtitled “How To Survive and Prosper in a Deflationary Depression,” and it will tell you exactly how to do just that. There’s still time to prepare for this impending financial disaster, but not much. Once things really get going, the panic will make it more difficult to protect yourself.

    You’ve got to start preparing now.




    Part 2 of Interview

    To someone not educated in both monetary trends and the Wave Principle, the coming of a second Great Depression is an idea that’s very hard to swallow.

    Understandably. Deflation and depression are exceedingly rare. As I mention in the forward to my new book, sustained deflation hasn’t occurred for 70 years, and the last one was so brief that it only lasted 3 years.

    During the past two centuries, there have been just two depressions; one in the nineteenth century, and one in the twentieth. Most economists now believe that deflation and depression are utterly impossible in our modern economy, if not ever.

    But there’s an enormous wealth of historical evidence that suggests that this rare event is about to occur.

    What evidence?

    Let me begin by stating an undisputed fact that every first year economics student learns about stocks: A stock certificate may have an objective value on one basis or another, but is still only worth what someone else is willing to pay for it.

    When we look at a 100 year chart for the Dow, we’re not looking at a record of the prosperity of the corporations involved. We’re looking at an intimate record of what people felt that stocks were worth. When the Dow crashed in 1929, it wasn’t a reaction to a sudden drop in corporate profits. That came afterward.

    Bear markets are a fear-based mass psychological phenomenon, which changes the value of the shares.

    So how does that relate to today’s market environment?

    It doesn’t matter that today’s Dow index comprises different companies from those in 1929. Human beings’ hard-wired, cyclical impulses of fear and hope have remained the same.

    Keeping in mind that a stock chart is a record of mass psychological impulses towards fear and hope, let’s compare two charts; one from 1929, and one from today’s markets:

    That’s uncanny, isn’t it? Though they were trading stocks of different companies, investors in 1929 and today’s investors have shown amazingly similar habits of valuation.

    Stock prices are determined by impulsive human nature in a interacting in a social setting. Because human nature does not change, history tends to repeat itself, even in stock prices.

    For those not already immersed in the Wave Principle, do you have more historical evidence to support your claim?

    I conducted a research into famous market manias and their aftermaths. Here’s what I found:

    A bull market mania is a rare event that produces a powerful, persistent rise with remarkably fewer, briefer and/or smaller setbacks. They occur at times of historic overvaluation and usually involve broad participation from the public.

    Of the most extreme cases of overvaluation in history was the Dutch Tulip bulb mania in the 1600s. I mean, it’s a pretty flower – but the bulbs weren’t made of gold. When people finally realized this, a mass psychologically-induced wave of fear sent prices to below the point where the mania began. That’s another important characteristic of a market mania.

    And we all witnessed the same psychological patterns with the Nikkei wipe-out throughout the nineties. We’ve seen it happen elsewhere, but still can’t believe that it could happen here.

    As you look at each of these charts and think about the specifications of a market mania, (powerful price runs, broad participation, rampant, unrealistic optimism) doesn’t it seem likely that that’s exactly what we experienced in the great market boom of the mid to late nineties?

    Well, some people said it was a New Economy.

    Yes, just like the New Era of 1928 and the Japanese Miracle of 1989.

    Look, I don’t expect these arguments to convince everyone outright that we’re staring down the barrel of the greatest financial disaster of our lives – but shouldn’t they should give you reason to stop and think?

    That’s all I’m asking of anyone. Don’t stay convinced of something merely because popular consensus refuses to question it. The crowd has been wrong many times before – and it will be wrong again.

    Can you tell us more about some of the evidence presented in your new book, “Conquer The Crash?”

    To me, the most convincing arguments rely on discussions of the Wave Principle. But I also spend 5 big chapters on monetary trends and the Federal Reserve. There is important information there that 1 person in 10,000 properly understands.



    Interview with Bob Prechter - Part 3

    Your historical market studies and research into the Wave Principle have led you to believe that stock prices are preparing to crash. We’ve heard some of your arguments for why this is already happening.

    But in Conquer the Crash you also give a good deal of attention to discussing and helping readers prepare for a severe monetary deflation. Can you tell us more about this?


    First I want to make sure that everyone understands what deflation really is. A common misunderstanding is that inflation occurs when the prices for goods rise, and deflation occurs when they drop. That’s not exactly true. General price changes are merely effects of a change in value of the money itself – not the other way around.

    So what causes changes in the value of money?

    Changes in monetary valuation are caused by changes in mass psychology. The same is true for the stock market. A severe deflation like the one we are now facing has always required a certain economic pre-condition: A major buildup of credit, which is itself the result of a certain state of social psychology.

    Our economy today rests upon masses of consumer and corporate credit. Today, the U.S. owes a collective $30 trillion in debt. That’s nearly 3 times our annual GDP. We’ve become entirely dependant on it.

    The economic theory that has seen the U.S. economy grow progressively larger and more powerful since World War II is that a wide-spread facilitation of credit will stimulate production, which will in turn create jobs and generate more capital to be re-invested in the economy.

    That’s a model that’s been successful for economies around the world thus far. Where do you see the problem with it?

    It’s gotten way out of hand. The Federal Reserve Board allows our banks to lend out all of their deposits (and in some cases, even more than 100%). This money, once loaned, is allowed to be re-loaned many times over, multiplying the amount of debt.

    What this means is that we’ve got great multiples more credit afloat in our economy than we have actual money. It’s terrifying, but true.

    As strong as our economy may still seem to everyone, it’s actually rife with weakness. The only thing keeping it afloat right now is a mass societal consensus that it’s going to be O.K. How long can that hold?

    As the stock market continues to decline, people will continue to lose their jobs and production will decrease. Knowing that there’s not enough money out there to cover all the endangered debt, banks will begin to panic. They will become desperate to retrieve their liquid assets. When the general ability to repay debt decreases, so will banks’ willingness to lend more.

    This is what will finally trigger a massive deflation.

    But wait. Won’t the Fed prevent this from happening?

    That’s a huge misconception. The Fed will be powerless to stop it.

    Realize that the Fed doesn’t actually lend money to consumers. It merely sets the interest rates at which banks lend each other money. The hope is that banks will take these lower rates as a cue to pass the lower rates down to the consumers, thus facilitating more credit – but it can’t guarantee that this will happen.

    In 2001, the Fed lowered its discount rate from 6 percent to 1.25 percent. That’s the heaviest cut in such a short time ever. But what if this strategy fails, as it did in Japan? It certainly hasn’t ”saved the economy” so far. What will they do if the economy continues to contract? Lower the rates to zero?

    Then what?

    When people are losing jobs and the purchasing power of the dollar is rising, consumers won’t want to borrow money that they will have to pay back with much more valuable dollars later on. Also, having been burned by bankruptcy and loan defaults, banks will be considerably less willing lend this money in the first place.

    This will have disastrous effects on our credit-based economy.

    Scary. So what should we do to protect ourselves from this possibility?

    Depending on your circumstances, there are a number of ways that you can first protect yourself from a deflationary crash, and then actually profit from it.

    Most important, get out of debt. Because the value of the dollar will be rising, one of the best investments you can make now will be to hold cash.

    What about the other markets?

    Conquer the Crash explains exactly what you should do in regard to bonds, real estate, stocks, commodities, precious metals, insurance, and more.

    It won’t be necessary for you to keep your money in a coffee can under the bed. There are a number of “Safe Banks” around the world that, because of their conservative policies, you will be able to trust with your money. Conquer the Crash lists several.

    Also, you’ll learn about “inverse index funds,” an interesting way to short the market on its way down. And it tells you exactly how risky real estate investments are and what you should do about them now.

    Obviously those with substantial personal fortunes stand to benefit from the wealth-protecting measures you outline in Conquer The Crash. But do you have to be wealthy to take advantage of the strategies in this book?

    Absolutely not. Conquer the Crash offers strategies for financial protection in two different tiers.

    For investors with deeper pockets, it offers international-level protection by giving advice about safe banks and precious metal storage. For the average investor, or even for those with no money in the markets at all, there are countless chapters devoted to important concerns like, “What to do with respect to your employment” and “What to do with your pension plan.”

    A lot of the advice is preventative. It tells you what not to do. And it’s going to be very important not to make mistakes. Only one or two missteps and you may find yourself in a very dangerous financial position along with the masses.

    Final words?

    The publisher will make most of the money from sales of this book. Anything we make will be spent on getting the word out about the crash. I know this disaster is coming, and I want to do everything that I can to protect people from it.

    Read Conquer the Crash, and then have your friends and loved ones read it. You can read it in a day, and it may keep you weathered from a storm that will be blowing for years to come.

    During the 1980s, Bob Prechter won numerous awards for market timing as well as the United States Trading Championship, culminating in Financial News Network (now CNBC) granting him the title, "Guru of the Decade." In 1990-1991, he was elected and served as president of the nation-al Market Technicians Association in its 21st year.

    He has also published a seminal book on Elliott wave analysis titled, “Elliott Wave Principle – Key To Market Behavior,” three books on the major practitioners of wave analysis, and books on his own views in Prechter's Perspective and At the Crest of the Tidal Wave.

    Link to Story & Graphs

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    Greatest Film Every Made?

    I just caught this at the Chicago Reader. I enjoy taking in a good artsy film now and again.

    Check it out:

    The Greatest Film Ever Made?
    Maybe, but Alain Resnais’ Last Year at Marienbad is definitely a contender for most misunderstood.


    Last Year at Marienbad Directed by Alan Resnais | Written by Alain Robbe-Grillet with Giogio Albertazzi, Delphine Seyrig, and Sacha Pitoeff
    Opens Friday 5/2 at the Music Box

    By Jonathan Rosenbaum

    It’s too bad Last Year at Marienbad was the most fashionable art-house movie of 1961-’62, because as a result it’s been maligned and misunderstood ever since. The chic allure of Alain Resnais’ second feature—a maddening, scintillating puzzle set in glitzy surroundings—produced a backlash, and one reason its defenders and detractors tend to be equally misguided is that both respond to the controversy rather than to the film itself.

    “I am now quite prepared to claim that Marienbad is the greatest film ever made, and to pity those who cannot see this,” proclaimed one French critic, even as others ridiculed what they perceived as the film’s pretentious solemnity—overlooking or missing its playful, if poker-faced, use of parody as well as its outright scariness. Dwight Macdonald, who admitted to seeing the movie three times in a week, confessed in Esquire that it made him feel like a dog in one of Pavlov’s experiments. In the Village Voice, on the other hand, Jonas Mekas claimed that “the film begins and ends in the brain of Alain Robbe-Grillet, who wrote the script” and added, “Its forced intellectualism is sick.” A few years later Noel Burch noted aptly, if unkindly, “There will always be an 8½ to serve as a refuge for those who are frightened by the prospects revealed by a Marienbad.”

    Part of what might frighten a Fellini fan was Marienbad’s formalism, as well as its mysterious, obsessional mood. But who could even describe what was happening on-screen? Sight and Sound’s Penelope Houston came the closest: “The opening is entirely hypnotic. Like the beginning of a fairy tale, it draws us into an alien world, gives us no chance to get our bearings, hints at clues which may or may not turn out to have meaning. Slowly, through a mosaic of images and fragments of dialogue, flashes of single figures, static groups, conversation pieces, all framed with the heavy theatricality of the setting, the theme of the film begins to crystallize.”

    Beautifully shot in black-and-white CinemaScope and set in an opulent rural hotel (or more likely several, dovetailed into a single labyrinthine set of interconnecting spaces), the movie centers on three upper-crust characters in formal or semiformal attire, identified in the script only as X, A, and M. X, the Italian narrator (Giorgio Albertazzi), tries to convince French fashion-plate A (Delphine Seyrig) that they’d met the previous year and had agreed to run away together upon meeting again this year, leaving behind A’s French husband, lover, and/or guardian, M (Sacha Pitoeff). All this could be real or imaginary, as perceived or fantasized by X or A—or us—in some indeterminate past, present, future, or conditional time.

    Also in Movies: the Chicago Anarchist Film Festival

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    Contributing to the confusion was Robbe-Grillet’s ponderous rhetoric, both in his high-flown, radical theories about the “new novel” (of which Marienbad was meant to be a prime illustration) and in X’s incantatory narration. In interviews they gave together, he and Resnais seemed to agree that their movie was about mental reality (without specifying whose) and persuasion. But their interpretations, including even their senses of the plot’s outcome, otherwise differed. For Resnais, X’s power over A was persuasive, a form of seduction; for Robbe-Grillet, it was basically rape. In his published screenplay, Robbe-Grillet even included a rape scene that Resnais refused to film, substituting a startling succession of overlit, subjective camera movements rushing repeatedly into A’s welcoming arms.

    I saw this lush experimental movie at least three times the week it opened at the Carnegie Hall Cinema, when I was a college sophomore, and was as smitten as anyone. I still am. But I don’t think Marienbad’s effect on me would have been as powerful if I hadn’t spent most of my childhood soaking up commercial movies, just as Resnais did. Hollywood and its French counterparts are at the center of the movie’s glamour and beguilement, as well as its tricky mind games. If you watch closely you’ll catch a glimpse of a life-size blowup of Alfred Hitchcock, eavesdropping on hotel guests beside an elevator, shortly before X makes his first on-screen appearance. Quite a bit later, when M is with A in her bedroom, Resnais’ sequence of shots alludes to a scene between Rita Hayworth and George Macready in Gilda. A’s Chanel dresses (including one made of feathers) evoke Marlene Dietrich in her Josef von Sternberg movies, and no less evident is the ambience of silent French high-society crime serials like Fantomas and Les Vampires.

    When X illogically appears twice within the same tracking shot—first seen playing cards with M and others, then approaching A, who’s been watching the game at a distance and from behind—the effect may be nightmarish, but it’s also not too different from a vaudeville gag in The Band Wagon, featuring Oscar Levant at both ends of a ladder. Even an allegorical game with matchsticks played repeatedly by X and M—a kind of puzzle within a puzzle—suggests the showdowns between heroes and villains in some westerns. Yet we’re never nudged to laugh at the campiness; Resnais never tampers with the film’s purity as a voluptuous experience.

    Both Resnais and Robbe-Grillet were born in 1922, and shared a set of cultural references. (Though Marienbad’s settings and costumes confound any precise sense of period, the era of their youth—evoked so memorably in Resnais’ 1986 Melo—seems to dominate.) The biggest difference between the two men may have been their sexual sensibilities. Robbe-Grillet’s preoccupation with bondage and domination—which earned him the jokey epithet metteur-en-chaine (“the placer in chains”) and turned his late novels into programmatic porn thrillers—placed him closer to the aggressive X, while Resnais was clearly more in sympathy with A (and would use Seyrig again, no less memorably, in his next feature, Muriel).

    The film is certainly about a battle of wills, but whether X or A comes out on top is far from certain. In Houston’s description, “fairy tale” is the crucial term, and Freudian resonances are never far away. What many have called cerebral in Marienbad is revealed to be highly emotional once one surrenders to the film’s dreamlike rhythms and sensual surfaces, its sudden, uncanny transitions, its rude shocks. And the haunting aftertaste is no less primal: “The film’s last shot is of the great chateau,” Houston noted, “and, with its few lighted windows, it no longer looks like a prison but like a place of refuge.” Despite the pretense of an adult drama of intrigue and infidelity, what lingers is a child’s frightened view of the strange goings-on.


    Opens Fri 5/2 at the Music Box.

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    Juan, feel free to move it, if you want.

    Who is David Diaz?

    By Robert Morales
    15Round.com

    Employees at Time Warner Cable in San Antonio on Tuesday were lined up to get the autograph of a particular boxer. He faced television cameras and print reporters as well during his day in Texas.

    Said boxer will be a guest at the Arizona Diamondbacks game against the Phillies tonight in Phoenix. And during the promotional tour for the biggest fight of his life, he will visit Los Angeles and San Francisco.

    Introducing David Diaz, holder of one of the four lightweight world championship belts. Never heard of him? That's OK. He is not exactly a household name, but he is the guy who is going to defend his title against Manny Pacquiao on June 28 at Mandalay Bay in Las Vegas. Pacquiao, a junior lightweight champion and one of the most popular fighters in the world, is moving up in weight.

    With longtime publicist Bill Caplan of Top Rank Inc. at his side Tuesday, Diaz went on a get-acquainted trip to San Antonio that included several hours at Time Warner, the parent company of HBO, which will televise this card on its pay-per-view arm.

    We then caught up with Caplan and Diaz as they sat at the airport awaiting their flight to Phoenix. Tonight at the baseball game, Diaz is scheduled to be a guest on the Diamondbacks' Spanish-language radio broadcast. Caplan will then take him through the press box and have him shake hands with some of the baseball writers.

    Caplan has been on this road 40-plus years. But it's new to Diaz, whose biggest victory came Aug. 4 when he won the championship with a unanimous decision over Erik Morales in Rosemont, Ill., which is near Diaz's hometown of Chicago.

    A win over Morales sounds good to the ear, but in reality Morales was washed up and afterward he announced his retirement.

    So, who is David Diaz? What would he want people to think about him in regards to his persona outside the ring?

    "That I'm just a guy, a regular guy who you can come up to and have a conversation with and laugh and joke around," Diaz said via telephone. "Easy going guy."

    Diaz grew up in the rough Humboldt Park section of Chicago. He was one of nine siblings, but the only one born in Chicago and not Mexico. One of his brothers passed away in 1998.
    "It was hard for my parents to feed us because we came from such a big family," Diaz said. "Since I was the last one, I was the baby. I had it pretty much easy. My brothers and sisters are the ones who went through the hard stuff so they could make it easier for me.
    "We lived in a rough neighborhood. But did I experience the roughness? I had good parents and a good activities base that kept me away from that and boxing was one of them."
    Certainly, he said, he was not the perfect kid.

    "I had my little trouble stints, but I guess I was always fearful of what my parents would say and that kept me in line," he said. "They did a lot for me."

    The trouble he did find was the kind that introduced him to the wrath of his father.
    "People say don't hit your kids but I got whipped a few times and I turned out OK," Diaz said, laughing.

    Caplan referred to Diaz as a "late bloomer." True enough. Diaz did not even get his first world championship shot until he took on Morales nine months ago at the age of 31; he'll be 32 on June 7. (A year earlier he won the interim title in August 2006 with a 10th-round stoppage of Jose Armando Santa Cruz).

    It didn't help Diaz that he took a two-year hiatus from boxing from September 2000 to September 2002. After beating Zab Judah in the 1996 Olympic Trials Box-Offs, Diaz represented the U.S. in the '96 Olympics and he went 1-1.

    He began his pro career in November 1996 and started 13-0 with five knockouts. But he was burned out and he quit.

    "My training wasn't as intense as when I was an amateur," Diaz said. "I guess in the same sense, I needed a break as well. It was just a hassle even getting to the gym with me. It was like, 'I have to go here again? Oh, man, I gotta do this workout.'

    "I think I needed a break and I took that break and I think it served me well because when I came back to the gym I was pumped. Everyone saw the change in me."

    Diaz has gone 21-1-1 with 12 knockouts since his 2002 return, giving him an overall record of 34-1-1 with 17 knockouts. His one loss was to Kendell Holt via eighth-round technical knockout in February 2005.

    But three years and four months after that setback, he will be defending his world championship belt against one of the best pound-for-pound fighters in the world in Pacquiao. Pacquiao is a national hero in his native Philippines, and he is adored everywhere else because of his ferocity and overall talent in the ring, and his engaging personality outside of it.

    Diaz said he's not scared. Not worried a bit about being on by far the biggest stage of his career, fighting Pacquiao in front of what is bound to be a very loud pro-Filipino crowd.
    "No, not really," he said. "I'm not at that point. This is all great and stuff but it's something that a fighter should want, a fight of this magnitude. ... It's exciting and everything, but I try not to get too caught up in it because I have a job to do and that's fight Manny Pacquiao."
    Diaz then introduced us to his sense of humor. He was asked if he had thought about what it's going to be like the week of the fight. Would he have the proverbial butterflies?

    "I don't think I will," he said. "I haven't yet and I feel pretty calm. The only time I get nervous is going up the stairs to the ring. I'm just afraid I might slip and look like a fool on national TV. That's the only time I get nervous."

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    Heading Down to Cicero Tonight!

    Hi Frank,

    That was an interesting article you posted up on David Diaz by Robert Morales. Very cool!

    I'll be heading down to Cicero tonight to catch the fights. In the main event, Chicago' popular Miguel Hernandez will be facing a rugged puncher by the name of "Superman" Derrick Findley. It should be a barn-burner, one that Hernandez should win if he's in good shape.



    Hernandez (left) and Findley at the weigh-in (photo courtesy of Bernie Bahrmasel)

    Speaking of which, I think you'll enjoy a piece I threw together last night on Dr. Stoxen, who hosted the weigh-in at his Team Doctors Treatment and Training Center of Champions. Below is a link to the piece:

    Link to Dr. Stoxen Article

    Anyways, if I don't chat with you before then, have a super day!



    Juan
    Last edited by Juan C Ayllon; 05-09-2008 at 04:24 AM.

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    Hernandez Lost!



    Well, Miguel Hernandez simply wasn't in the best of shape, and it showed in his bout versus Derrick Findley.

    I posted up a report on his bout, which you can read at the link below:

    Hernandez-Findley Fight Report Link

    I should have the rest of the results posted up in the next several days.

    Coincidentally, I talked with Miguel yesterday while I was en route to pick up my mother for dinner at Cabs for Mother's Day. He's doing fine, just disappointed in his performance and the shape he was in. Interestingly enough, he said he took two aspirin prior to the bout, which he reminded thins out the blood. That, he said, was the reason for all the bleeding.

    "He caught me with a short uppercut," Hernandez said.

    And then the bloodfest began.

    I'm glad that Miguel is doing well, as health is not something to take for granted.



    As for Derrick, he looked the best I've seen him. He was in great shape, he covered up well, and throwing good, straight punches.
    Last edited by Juan C Ayllon; 05-12-2008 at 04:19 AM.

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    Nice to Hear



    Wow! I just received a message back from the organizer of this amateur boxing show being held this Friday night that made my afternoon.

    I'd posted up his fight poster, along with his info on the CBZ Newswire page earlier today, and he emailed me the following message:

    Juan,

    That is awesome.

    Thanks to you a boxing judge volunteered his services!



    Yours in boxing,

    Robert Ramos
    Executive Director
    Chicago Youth Boxing Club (CYBC)
    rrock65@hotmail.com
    "Giving Chicago's Inner-City Youth a Fighting Chance"
    Mobile: 773-383-0166
    Gym Office: 773-521-9555

    http://www.chicagoyouthboxing.com/

    Click the link below to view the YouTube video on Chicago Youth Boxing Club.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BD7qXzOFF6Y
    That's very cool to hear!

    Hey, if any of you stop by the show, can write a bit, and are up to it, shoot and send me several photos and a report to my email address, and I'll be happy to post them up.

    My email address is:


    JuanCAyllon@yahoo.com

    Cheers,



    Juan
    Last edited by Juan C Ayllon; 05-13-2008 at 11:18 AM.

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    Funny Story on the Origin of the Human Race!

    I just received the from my friend, Tina, in an email. What a hoot!



    A LITTLE GIRL ASKED HER MOTHER, "HOW DID THE HUMAN RACE APPEAR?

    THE MOTHER ANSWERED, "GOD MADE ADAM AND EVE AND THEY HAD CHILDREN AND THEN ALL MANKIND WAS MADE".

    TWO DAYS LATER THE GIRL ASKED HER FATHER THE SAME QUESTION.


    THE FATHER ANSWERED, "MANY YEARS AGO THERE WERE MONKEYS FROM WHICH THE HUMAN RACE EVOLVED.


    THE CONFUSED GIRL RETURNED TO HER MOTHER AND SAID, "MOM, HOW IS IT POSSIBLE THAT YOU TOLD ME THE HUMAN RACE WAS CREATED BY GOD, AND DAD SAID WE DEVELOPED FROM MONKEYS?"


    THE MOTHER ANSWERED, "WELL, DEAR, IT IS VERY SIIMPLE. I TOLD YOU ABOUT MY SIDE OF THE FAMILY AND YOUR FATHER TOLD YOU ABOUT HIS".
    Last edited by Juan C Ayllon; 05-15-2008 at 06:47 AM.

  28. #448
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    Fight Report from Cicero Last Friday



    That's me at left above with Derrick Findley, who prevailed over Miguel Hernandez in the fights last Friday. Findley's promoter asked me to shoot a photo of him with Findley and, after I'd done so, I asked him to return the favor. So, the photo above was shot by Octavius James, Derrick Findley's promoter. What a hoot!



    Findley with his promoter, Octavius James

    Anyways, for the report, click on the link below:

    Fight Report on Hernandez vs. Findley

    Cheers,



    Juan
    Last edited by Juan C Ayllon; 05-15-2008 at 06:34 PM.

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    In Case You Missed It: 'Duran Unplugged.'

    In case you missed it, you might enjoy an interview I conducted with Roberto Duran in 2006.




    Roberto Duran recently (photo by his daughter, Dalia Duran)

    Below is a link to that interview that I conducted with Duran via telephone.



    Roberto Duran with his daughter, Dalia (photo courtesy of Dalia Duran)

    I'd had previous conversations with Dalia, his daughter, who'd submitted photos and a couple articles and press releases, and got her to agree to set up a telephone interview with her old man.

    You might find his answers a little amusing and somewhat illuminating:

    "Roberto Duran, Unplugged" Link

    By the way, according to heavyweight contender Fres Oquendo, who was promoted briefly by Duran's partnership, DRL, that promotional team has since dissolved.

  30. #450
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    A Piece on Diaz-Pacquiao Press Junkets in Chicago



    Hey,

    I thought you might enjoy this little diddy I put up on the Diaz-Pacquiao press and public appearances by Pacquiao and Diaz for their upcoming bout on June 28th in Las Vegas.

    Here's a link:

    Press Junket Link

    As a little background, after the deal at Dearborn and whatchamacallit, I made a beeline for my brother's restaurant, Cabs Wine Bar Bistro in Glen Ellyn, where I went through my photos, drafted up a piece and put it up piecemeal at the bar of Cabs. The thing was, the wireless thingie kept booting me off every few minutes, so I had to keep logging back on.

    However, the struggle was worth it, as I enjoyed a wonderful four course wine and food match.

    Anyways, I hope my piece is somewhat readable.

    Regards,


    Juan
    Last edited by Juan C Ayllon; 05-21-2008 at 07:41 PM.

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