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Thread: BOB FOSTER VS. MICHAEL SPINKS by Lee Groves & M. Mulcahe

  1. #1
    GorDoom
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    BOB FOSTER VS. MICHAEL SPINKS by Lee Groves & M. Mulcahe

    Mythical Head2Head: Bob Foster vs. Michael Spinks
    By Lee Groves and Martin Mulcahey from Max Boxing

    On February 17, 2004, Marty Mulcahey and Lee Groves wrote a "Classic Head2Head" article about who would win a mythical showdown between Julio Cesar Chavez and Aaron Pryor had they met during their respective primes at the weight. Groves chose Pryor because he thought Chavez was slightly past his best form at 140 and Pryor’s whirlwind attack would eventually wear down "J.C. Superstar." Mulcahey thought Chavez’s solid fundamentals, concrete chin and withering, accurate attack would break Pryor.

    After a long hiatus, MaxBoxing’s resident historians have decided to revive the series and discuss more fantasy matchups. Today’s edition pits Bob Foster and Michael Spinks, who occupy two of most experts’ top 10 lists of top 175 pounders. Let the debate begin.

    Lee: Hey Marty, it’s good to be back in the swing of things after such a long break. I don’t know about you, but I hope I won’t suffer from ring rust on the brain.

    Marty: Ah yes, mental ring rust. Well, it could apply since rust only settles upon immobile and solid objects, and my mind is solidly set as well as unmovable in its opinion that Bob Foster is superior to Michael Spinks in a head-to-head matchup.

    The Case for Foster: First, I have to concede that this is an extremely even matchup between two men with God-given talent, hard-earned skill sets, and the willingness to challenge themselves beyond their natural weight classes.

    With both men pretty evened up physically and skill-wise, this bout should turn on basis of intangibles. This is where I believe my man has the edge. In Spinks' lone loss, he collapsed mentally and was clearly intimidated by Mike Tyson. Spanning the long history of the light heavyweight division, there was no more intimidating sight than the long and lean figure of Bob Foster stepping out of a corner, and into your face with his precision punches. Foster also displayed his mental toughness by traveling to England and South Africa against Chris Finnegan and Pierre Fourie to face two of his more accomplished challengers. Spinks has probably never seen the inside of an international airport, and rarely fought before hostile crowds.

    Foster was not the one-dimensional slugger many see him to be either. He was a well-schooled and accomplished amateur – He was 94-7 with in incredible 89 knockouts and he won the All-Air Force light heavyweight title, the Brittania Shield Tournament in London, a Golden Gloves crown in Washington, D.C. and a Pan Am Games gold medal. He only missed out on the Olympics because he refused to fight as a middleweight instead of his natural weight class of light heavyweight. This is another notch on the belt for my mental toughness case, which shows that Foster did not bow to any demands he thought beneath him, or unreasonable. Even after all the mental intangibles have been exhausted, I will fall back on a decisive advantage Foster had over Spinks in the ring. His punches were more compact and straighter than Spinks' in my opinion. Given the way these two could bang, the first to reach the destination should win.

    Lee: Thanks, Marty -- that’s just the shot of Rust-O-Leum I needed. You present good arguments, but there are some openings that can be exploited.

    The case for Spinks: First, Spinks was not alone in being intimidated by the young Mike Tyson. One can make a good argument that the Tyson who flattened Spinks was at his absolute physical and mental peak, especially with all the emotional anguish leading up to the June 1988 fight. Tyson was able to put aside managerial and marital difficulties to blow away a Michael Spinks that had yet to be beaten as a professional.

    As for the amateur career, Spinks was pretty accomplished as well as he ended this phase of his evolution in the best possible way – with an Olympic gold medal. During his days as a simon pure, Spinks engaged in numerous bouts overseas and came out victorious far more often than not, so I think he’s seen more than a few international airports, thank you. Plus, he overcame a tough childhood on the streets of St. Louis, so I wouldn’t worry about Spinks’ mental fortitude.

    Unlike Foster -- who was pulverized by Joe Frazier in two rounds, knocked out in seven rounds by Ernie Terrell, stopped in eight rounds by Muhammad Ali and decisioned by Zora Folley – Spinks enjoyed success as a heavyweight, going 4-1. He became the first reigning light heavyweight champion to win the heavyweight title, beating heavily favored Larry Holmes by split decision. In fact, the conventional wisdom said Spinks would lose in four of his five heavyweight fights – twice against Holmes, once against Gerry Cooney and, of course, once against Tyson. In the one fight in which he was the favorite, he splattered Steffen Tangstad in four rounds. This argument establishes that Spinks is the greater fighter overall.

    The crux of my argument for Spinks lies in the oft-repeated adage "styles make fights." At 6-3, Spinks could look Foster in the eyes and his 76-inch reach compared very favorably to the New Mexican’s. Foster usually enjoyed height and reach advantages over his 175-pound opponents so it would be interesting to see how he would have handled a fellow giant.

    Spinks would use his vastly superior foot speed and difficult, herky-jerky style to throw off Foster’s timing. As Sam Soliman proved against Winky Wright a few weeks back, there’s nothing like a weird style to offset a fundamentally sound fighter. Spinks’ bouquet of unpredictable combinations would force Foster to hesitate because he couldn’t bank on Spinks’ next punch coming from the usual angle. Spinks’ style would also present a challenge to Foster’s formidable mental strength. He will have to resist the urge to become frustrated because if he does, he will provide Spinks with even more counterpunching opportunities.

    The bottom line is this: Foster is a great fighter, and I have him at the very top of my light heavyweight champions list. But even great fighters have styles with which they have trouble, and Spinks’ style is as difficult a puzzle that could be presented. As the old saying goes, he who hesitates is lost, and if Foster is forced to hesitate he will lose to Spinks.

    Marty: Just as I suspected. The expert opposition has chosen to open by replying to my argument, instead of taking the initiative by formulating a credible argument for Spinks' supremacy in the ring. True, you did present a feasible scenario and some good rationale (advantage in foot speed being the best) at the end of your rambling soliloquy. Ironically, this is how I would envision a fight between Foster and Spinks playing out. Spinks would hesitate in taking the initiative early, thus giving the important formative rounds away. This also gives the play to Foster, who, when allowed to dictate pace, range, and come forward, was nearly unstoppable at light heavyweight.

    Spinks had the talent to adjust and use Foster's aggressiveness against him, then begin to time Foster while employing his own awkward rhythm. However, it would not happen with a sudden burst, and giving away the early rounds could certainly influence how the judges see the rest of a close fight. This means that if the fight went to the judges, Spinks' faltering in the early rounds would lead to a loss on the scorecards -- if a continually advancing Foster would allow it to get to that stage. Put in the role of the aggressor, Foster had no equal at light heavy, and Foster showed in the late stages of his career that he had no problem going the distance when it was called for.

    In closing, I would like to concede that Spinks beat a better list of title challengers at light heavyweight, and even agree that Spinks had a better record against the heavys. But remember that this fantasy bout would take place at light heavyweight, and given the way Foster destroyed his challengers, I believe it warrants the assumption that he could have beaten Spinks' challengers just as handily. Besides which, Foster's opposition at heavy was a bit superior to Steffen Tangstad, Gerry Cooney, and an excellent, but past his prime Larry Holmes (Holmes was 36 in his first closely contested match with Spinks).

    You also mention that a prime Spinks had not been beaten before the Tyson fight, which I am sure one Eddie Davis would disagree with. Davis was a good light heavy with a questionable chin, whom Spinks struggled to figure out (KO Magazine's Steve Farhood scored it 114-114). Many thought the win went Spinks' way because of a million-dollar rematch with Dwight Qawi that was already signed and funded by HBO. It is notable, and again it comes down to Spinks' mental predilections, that Davis was never given a rematch. Foster, in his prime, left little to no doubt when he beat his light heavyweight challengers.

    Lastly, I would like to invoke the words of famed boxing trainer and television analyst Teddy Atlas, who states "Boxing is 75 percent mental" (many others in the sport also use this axiom, with respected trainer Freddie Roach and Emanuel Steward at the high end claiming it is 90 percent). With that, I come full circle. It is Foster who has the superior mindset, where in every other respect it is hard to give the edge to either Foster or Spinks. Anyone who has read, or listened to interviews of both fighters cannot help but come away with a sense that Foster was the more mentally decisive of the duo. That, my friends, is the difference in an otherwise balanced competition between coequals.

    Lee: Ah, so the gloves come off. The reason I chose to respond to your points is because if I want to persuade the readers out there that my argument is superior -- and it is -- I must pick apart your statements point by point. I’m a counterpuncher by nature and so was Spinks, who sized up his opponents, exploited their weaknesses and got the victory by any means necessary.

    One of Spinks' greatest assets was his intelligence, and that intelligence would tell him that Foster was nobody to mess with right out of the gate. Foster was a time bomb waiting to go off, so Spinks would have approach Foster as if he were a human bomb – find a way to get within range, snip a wire and get out before the shrapnel comes.

    True, Spinks was a slow starter most of the time, but he did have some very good moments early in fights. He seized the initiative in one of his most important title fights -- his unification bout with Dwight Qawi -- by landing his vaunted "Spinks Jinx" in the first round. The strength of the blow sent a powerful message to the intimidating Qawi, and for the rest of the fight he never was able to unleash the buzzsaw attack that twice cut Matthew Saad Muhammad to bits. In a crucially important match with a monster like big, bad Bob, who cut an more imposing figure than Qawi, Spinks would do what he needed to do to come out the winner, and if it meant starting slowly only to finish quickly, he could do so. After all, he won two fights against Holmes that way.

    Another one of Spinks' virtues is patience -- with the help of master trainer Eddie Futch, Spinks walked into the ring with a definitive fight plan and he had the discipline to carry it out step by step. Foster would be the one coming forward, which was just fine for the counterpunching Spinks. He would use his speed to take advantage of openings and his more than respectable power to keep Foster honest. I think Foster would remember the way Spinks knocked the tough Marvin Johnson unconscious with a single left uppercut to the jaw. He wouldn't be afraid of Spinks' power, but he would be mindful of it -- and rightly so.

    Foster was never a ball of fire in the ring as far as number of punches thrown, and like it or not, activity counts as much as effectiveness in many judges' eyes. Spinks was a hustler while Foster was a stalker who worked the jab while looking to land a fight-ending bomb. The possibility is great that Foster could spend the entire fight looking to land the big one while Spinks would sneak in the back door and take the decision.

    As for questionable decisions, you bring up Eddie Davis. In return, I give you Jorge Ahumada, whose fight with Foster was somehow judged a draw. I don't know if there were political shenanigans behind the verdict, but in the ring it seemed the younger Ahumada did enough to dethrone the 35-year-old Foster. Foster himself got the message loud and clear -- he was no longer a dominant force – prompting him to vacate the championship three months later.

    Throughout his career, Spinks has been candid about his misgivings going into fights, but they didn't stop him from doing the job. He was a realist who was fully aware of the risks boxing posed and because he knew he could get hurt, he trained his butt off to give himself the best opportunity to win – as well as exit the ring safe and sound. Cus D'Amato often spoke of using fear to its best advantage, and Spinks' definitely did that. Yes, Spinks would be worried about Foster's gifts, as he should be. That concern would fuel him into acquiring that certain "edge" that would bring his athletic performance to a fine sharpness. It wouldn't be easy, but Spinks would peck, poke and hustle his way to victory against one of the greatest 175-pounders who has yet lived.

  2. #2
    GorDoom
    Guest

    Re: BOB FOSTER VS. MICHAEL SPINKS by Lee Groves & M. Mul

    This to me is as hard a pick as Gavilan-Griffith. To absolutely superb light heavies & I gotta say I don'r have a clue as to who would win. It could go either way very easily.

    This one is gonna take some cogitation.

    GorDoom

  3. #3
    Roberto Aqui
    Guest

    Re: BOB FOSTER VS. MICHAEL SPINKS by Lee Groves & M. Mul

    [[[[This one is gonna take some cogitation.]]]]
    ==================

    You can cogitate, masticate, and and ruminate all you want. Nobody will ever convince anybody who might win this fight. Betting on this fight is straight up.

  4. #4
    starlingstomp
    Guest

    Re: BOB FOSTER VS. MICHAEL SPINKS by Lee Groves & M. Mul

    Never liked Spinks.

    He was a great fighter, but his style was absolutely horrible.

    It was sad to see such a classic stylist like Eddie Gregory turn up out of shape and lose to him.

  5. #5
    Steve McV
    Guest

    Re: BOB FOSTER VS. MICHAEL SPINKS

    I think Spinks' odd style frustrated opponents and won him many rounds. Decent hand and foot speed plus keeping his head in bad situations won him fights.

    I think he would win the first ten rounds against Foster, 6-3-1. Then, in the eleventh, Foster would floor Spinks. The 12th would be brutal, a hurt fighter continuing valiantly against a terrific slugger/boxer. The 13th would be the end, with Arthur Mercante deciding that Spinks had gone through enough and calling the fight for Foster by TKO.

    Spinks is one of the best ever of the light heavies, top 5 certainly in my book.

    Foster is THE best.

  6. #6
    GorDoom
    Guest

    Re: BOB FOSTER VS. MICHAEL SPINKS

    The wild card in this fight is that Spinks also had one punch power - but in both hands. Foster's chin wasn't granite though admittedly he was only KO'd by heavies until the very end of his career.

    This one is such a tough call because Foster could have ended it with one shot also.

    GorDoom

  7. #7
    GorDoom
    Guest

    BOB FOSTER's CAREER RECORD

    Bob Foster

    Born: Dec. 15, 1938, Albeuquerque, NM
    Pro Record: 56-8-1 (46 kayos)


    Foster was one of the hardest punchers in ring history. His knockout victory over Mike Quarry documented one of the most perfect punches ever thrown.



    1961
    27 Mar Duke Williams Washington, DC KO2
    3 Apr Clarence Ryan NY W4
    8 May Billy Johnson NY W4
    22 Jun Ray Bryan Canada KO2
    8 Aug Floyd McCoy Canada W6
    2 Nov Ernie Knox VA KO4
    4 Dec Clarence Floyd Canada KO4

    1962
    19 May Billy Tisdale NY KO2
    27 Jun Bert Whitehurst NY W8
    20 Oct Doug Jones NY KO by 8

    1963
    18 Feb Richard Benjamin Washington, DC KO1
    29 Apr Curtis Bruce Washington, DC KO4
    6 Nov Mauro Mina Lima L10
    11 Dec Willie Besmanoff VA KO3

    1964
    25 Feb Dave Bailey Miami Beach, FL KO1
    8 May Allen Thomas IL KO1
    10 Jul Ernie Terrell NY KO by 7
    23 Nov Norm Letcher CA KO1
    11 Dec Don Quinn VA KO1
    11 Dec Henry Hank VA KO10

    1965
    15 Jan Roberto Rascon NM KO2
    21 Mar Dave Russell VA KO6
    24 May Chuck Leslie LA KO3
    26 Jul Henry Hank LA W12
    6 Dec Zora Folley LA L10

    1966
    6 Dec Leroy Green VA KO2

    1967
    16 Jan Jim Robinson Washington, DC KO1
    27 Feb Andres Selpa Washington, DC KO2
    8 May Eddie Cotton Washington, DC KO3
    9 Jun Henry Matthews VA KO2
    25 Oct Levan Roundtree Washington, DC KO8
    20 Nov Eddie Vick RI W10
    5 Dec Sonny Moore Washington, DC KO5

    1968
    24 May Dick Tiger NY KO4
    (Won World Light Heavyweight Title)
    29 Jul Charley Polite MA KO3
    26 Aug Eddie Vick NM KO9
    9 Sep Roger Rouse Washington, DC KO5

    1969
    22 Jan Frank De Paula NY KO1
    (Retained World Light Heavyweight Title)
    24 May Andy Kendall MA KO4
    (Retained World Light Heavyweight Title)
    19 Jun Levan Roundtree GA KO4
    2 Nov Chuck Leslie LA KO5

    1970
    24 Feb Bill Hardney FL KO4
    9 Mar Cookie Wallace FL KO6
    4 Apr Roger Rouse MT KO4
    (Retained World Light Heavyweight Title)
    27 Jun Mark Tessman MD KO10
    (Retained World Light Heavyweight Title)
    18 Nov Joe Frazier MI KO by 2
    (For World Heavyweight Title)

    1971
    2 Mar Hal Carroll PA KO4
    (Retained World Light Heavyweight Title)
    24 Apr Ray Anderson FL W15
    (Retained World Light Heavyweight Title)
    17 Aug Vernon McIntosh FL KO3
    29 Oct Tommy Hicks PA KO8
    (Retained World Light Heavyweight Title)
    16 Dec Brian Kelly OK KO3
    (Retained World Light Heavyweight Title)

    1972
    7 Apr Vincente Rondon FL KO2
    (Retained World Light Heavyweight Title)
    27 Jun Mike Quarry NV KO4
    (Retained World Light Heavyweight Title)
    26 Sep Chris Finnegan England KO14
    (Retained World Light Heavyweight Title)
    21 Nov Muhammad Ali NV KO by 8

    1973
    21 Aug Pierre Fourie NM W15
    (Retained World Light Heavyweight Title)
    1 Dec Pierre Fourie South Africa W15
    (Retained World Light Heavyweight Title)

    1974
    17 Jun Jorge Ahumada NM D15
    (Retained World Light Heavyweight Title)

    16 Sep Annnnounced Retirement

    1975
    28 Jun Bill Hardney NM KO3

    1976
    8 May Al Bolden MT KO3
    28 Aug Harold Carter MT W10
    25 Sep Al Bolden WA KO6

    1977
    2 Sep Bob Hazelton Curacao KO10

    1978
    9 Feb Mustafa Wassaja Denmark KO by 5
    3 Jun Bob Hazelton KS KO by 2

  8. #8
    GorDoom
    Guest

    MICHAEL SPINKS' CAREER RECORD

    Michael Spinks
    "Spinks Jinx"

    Born: July 13, 1956 St. Louis, MO
    Amateur Record: 93-7 (35 kayos)
    Manager: Butch Lewis

    Professional Record: 31-1 (21 kayos)



    Spinks currently co-manages fighters with his former manager and
    promoter Butch Lewis.

    Amateur Highlights


    1975
    --- Tom Brooks Shreveport, LA L 3
    (Silver Medal, National AAU Championships, 165 lbs.)

    1976
    --- Lamont Kirkland Miami W DQ 3
    (Wins National Golden Glove Championships, 165 lbs.)
    --- Keith Broom Cincinnati W 3
    (Wins U.S. Olympic Trials, 165 lbs.)

    Olympic Gold Medalist Middleweight, Montreal
    --- Jean-Marie Emebe Cameroon Forfeit
    --- Ryszard Pasiewicz Poland W Dec
    --- Alec Nastac Romania Forfeit
    --- Rufat Riskiev Soviet Union TKO 3
    (Gold Medal Match)

    Professional Record

    1977
    Apr 17 Eddie Benson Las Vegas KO 1
    May 9 Luis Rodriguez St. Louis W 6
    Jun 1 Joe Borden Montreal KO 2
    Aug 23 Jasper Brisbane Philadelphia TKO 2
    Sep 13 Ray Elson Los Angeles KO 1
    Oct 21 Gary Summerhays Las Vegas W 8

    1975
    Feb 15 Tom "The Bomb" Bethea Las Vegas W 8
    Dec 15 Eddie Phillips White Plains, NY TKO 4

    1979
    Nov 24 Marc Hans Bloomington, MN TKO 1

    1980
    Feb 1 Johnny Wilburn Louisville W 8
    Feb 4 Ramon Ronquillo Atlantic City TKO 6
    May 4 Murray Sutherland Kiamesha Lake, MI W 10
    Aug 2 David Conteh Baton Rouge, LA TKO 9
    Oct 18 Yaqui Lopez Atlantic City TKO 7

    1981
    Jan 24 Willie Taylor Philadelphia TKO 8
    Mar 28 Marvin Johnson Atlantic City KO 4
    Jul 18 Eddie Mustafa Muhammad Las Vegas W 15
    (Wins WBA Light Heavyweight Title)
    Nov 7 Vonzell Johnson Atlantic City TKO 7
    (Retains WBA Light Heavyweight Title)

    1982
    Feb 13 Mustapha Wasajja Atlantic City KO 6
    (Retains WBA Light Heavyweight Title)
    Apr 11 Murray Sutherland Atlantic City KO 8
    (Retains WBA Light Heavyweight Title)
    Jun 12 Jerry Celestine Atlantic City TKO 8
    (Retains WBA Light Heavyweight Title)
    Sep 18 Johnny Davis Atlantic City TKO 9
    (Retains WBA Light Heavyweight Title)

    1983
    Mar 18 Dwight Braxton Atlantic City W 15
    (Unifies World Light Heavyweight Title)
    Nov 25 Oscar Rivadeneyra Vancouver, BC TKO 10
    (Retains World Light Heavyweight Title)

    1984
    Feb 25 Eddie Davis Atlantic City W 12
    (Retains World Light Heavyweight Title)

    1985
    Feb 23 David Sears Atlantic City TKO 3
    (Retains World Light Heavyweight Title)
    Jun 6 Jim MacDonald Las Vegas TKO 8
    (Retains World Light Heavyweight Title)
    Sep 21 Larry Holmes Las Vegas W 15
    (Wins Lineal (IBF) Heavyweight Title)
    Sep 22 Spinks abandons his Light Heavyweight Title

    1986
    Apr 19 Larry Holmes Las Vegas W 15
    (Retains Lineal (IBF) Heavyweight Title)
    Sep 6 Steffan Tangstad Las Vegas TKO 4
    (Retains Lineal (IBF) Heavyweight Title)

    1987
    Apr Spinks is stripped of the IBF Title after he opts to fight
    Gerry Cooney, instead of going along with the HBO and Don
    King backed Heavyweight unification tournament.

    Jun 15 Gerry Cooney Atlantic City TKO 5
    (Retains Lineal Heavyweight Title)

    1988
    Jun 27 Mike Tyson Atlantic City KO by 1
    (Loses Lineal, For Tyson's Alphabet Heavyweight Title)

    Jul Announces Retirement

  9. #9
    Forum Flash
    Guest

    Re: MICHAEL SPINKS' CAREER RECORD

    Never liked Spinks, so my pick is tainted badly, but at least
    I admit that! :lol
    Foster by KO in 13

  10. #10
    GorDoom
    Guest

    Re: MICHAEL SPINKS' CAREER RECORD

    After some serious cogitation the best I can come up with is: 6-5 pick 'em ... Not a great answer, but the best response I can come up with.

    GorDoom

  11. #11
    PeteLeo
    Guest

    Re: MICHAEL SPINKS' CAREER RECORD

    Spinks always seemed to take a lot of punishment early when paired with good fighters (Lopez, Johnson, Qawi, Conteh), so I have the feeling Bob might just blast him out inside of three. Of course, Mike would be extra-careful with a guy like Foster. If it went past the mid-way point, I would shift my prediction to Spinks by a righthander. PeteLeo.

  12. #12
    Fat Abbot
    Guest

    Re: BOB FOSTER VS. MICHAEL SPINKS by Lee Groves & M. Mulcahe

    If Bob Foster couldn't survive Ernie Terrel or Doug Jones, how could he hope to survive Michael Spinks?

    On the flipside Spinks beat much more dangerous competition at both LH and HW than Foster ever did.

    There's a reason why Foster fared so poorly at HW, he lacked the skills and durability to win a fight where his size and punching power alone did not ensure him victory.

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    Re: BOB FOSTER VS. MICHAEL SPINKS by Lee Groves & M. Mulcahe

    I found a VCR (remember them?) in the garage this morning and in it was a compilation of Bob Foster videos. I plug the bad boy in and there's Bob trying to get to Mike Quarry...to see if he was alive! I rewound it and watched the KO about 13 times, (making it an even 1,000 viewings... at least) and then stumbled on to this when my arm hairs stopped standing up.

    Damn, what an absolutely frightening shot that was.

    Helluva lead-in on this thread, since I dug it up, I wanted to share.

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    Re: BOB FOSTER VS. MICHAEL SPINKS by Lee Groves & M. Mulcahe

    Husker, Foster flattened Dick Tiger the same way as M. Quarry, too, if you want to see another scary clip.

    I agree with all of you that this is a pick 'em, but I go with Spinks. A smarter fighter who didn't get hit that much at all (despite what someone said above). A top amateur who insiders said (according to Gil Clancy) was THE most talented American going into the 1976 Olympics, a team that included Leonard, Davis, and Leon Spinks. Michael did considerably better against heavies than did Foster, and I feel Bob would have lost to Tyson the exact way that Spinks did. Frazier beat him much this way, Tyson would have done it quicker.

    As GorDoom aptly noted, Spinks could starch you with one punch from either fist. Foster was clearly a left-hooker. He also had a height/reach advantage (a minor one) which might have bothered Michael--yet he wasn't so bothered by the disparate height/reach advantages Cooney had over him.

    I think Michael takes the better shot (never down in his career except vs Tyson) and is more skilled. So I like him to decision Foster, maybe KO him if he catches him cleanly, and yet I agree it should be about a pick 'em going in.

    Re: StarlingStomp's comment, "It was sad to see such a classic stylist like Eddie Gregory turn up out of shape and lose to him." - I am a BIG Eddie fan, but as Spinks said after Eddie failed to make weight in their 1983 rematch (subsequently cancelled), "Coming in overweight is a tradition with Eddie."

    Clancy especially among commentators constantly harped about Eddie's lack of desire and conditioning. I loved the guy but have to say he rarely gave an inspired performance (I mean to say, showing great desire, even aggression). He spoke of being bored after KOing Jerry Martin, which was amusing and funny. . . but he could have cured his own boredom by beating Martin quicker, if boredom was such a problem. Lost to Galindez by hardly fighting. Fought like a joke vs. Snipes, claiming great injury later. There are many more examples in Eddie's career.

    No need to remind me of his great performances, I have all of his broadcast fights on tape or disc, and appreciate his vast skills; but this is who Eddie was. Always getting by on the latent skills and threat of his power.

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    Re: BOB FOSTER VS. MICHAEL SPINKS by Lee Groves & M. Mulcahe

    Husker, Foster flattened Dick Tiger the same way as M. Quarry, too, if you want to see another scary clip.

    I agree with all of you that this is a pick 'em, but I go with Spinks. A smarter fighter who didn't get hit that much at all (despite what someone said above). A top amateur who insiders said (according to Gil Clancy) was THE most talented American going into the 1976 Olympics, a team that included Leonard, Davis, and Leon Spinks. Michael did considerably better against heavies than did Foster, and I feel Bob would have lost to Tyson the exact way that Spinks did. Frazier beat him much this way, Tyson would have done it quicker.

    As GorDoom aptly noted, Spinks could starch you with one punch from either fist. Foster was clearly a left-hooker. He also had a height/reach advantage (a minor one) which might have bothered Michael--yet he wasn't so bothered by the disparate height/reach advantages Cooney had over him.

    I think Michael takes the better shot (never down in his career except vs Tyson) and is more skilled. So I like him to decision Foster, maybe KO him if he catches him cleanly, and yet I agree it should be about a pick 'em going in.

    Re: StarlingStomp's comment, "It was sad to see such a classic stylist like Eddie Gregory turn up out of shape and lose to him." - I am a BIG Eddie fan, but as Spinks said after Eddie failed to make weight in their 1983 rematch (subsequently cancelled), "Coming in overweight is a tradition with Eddie."

    Clancy especially among commentators constantly harped about Eddie's lack of desire and conditioning. I loved the guy but have to say he rarely gave an inspired performance (I mean to say, showing great desire, even aggression). He spoke of being bored after KOing Jerry Martin, which was amusing and funny. . . but he could have cured his own boredom by beating Martin quicker, if boredom was such a problem. Lost to Galindez by hardly fighting. Fought like a joke vs. Snipes, claiming great injury later. There are many more examples in Eddie's career.

    No need to remind me of his great performances, I have all of his broadcast fights on tape or disc, and appreciate his vast skills; but this is who Eddie was. Always getting by on the latent skills and threat of his power.

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    Re: BOB FOSTER VS. MICHAEL SPINKS by Lee Groves & M. Mulcahe

    Bob's best chance of getting Michael out of there would have to come in the first four, or five rounds, and the chances of that are slim to none.Michael Spinks would have a plan coming in to fight, and that he would execute it once he got into his rhythmn in the middle rounds.Spinks by UD over 15 over Foster, with a possible late round stoppage happening.

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    Re: BOB FOSTER VS. MICHAEL SPINKS by Lee Groves & M. Mulcahe

    Spinks would trouble Foster alot but, ultimately, I think Foster lands one of his bombs and Spinks goes to sleep.....I say Foster by KO inside 8 rounds.

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    Re: BOB FOSTER VS. MICHAEL SPINKS by Lee Groves & M. Mulcahe

    I think the Foster jab is a game changer. It's keeps Spinks where Foster wants him. It also sets up those Foster bombs.

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    Re: BOB FOSTER VS. MICHAEL SPINKS by Lee Groves & M. Mulcahe

    In the past I used to say Foster. But Spinks had a much better record at heavyweight. Spinks decisioned Holmes 2x and kayoed a still dangerous Gerry Cooney. Could Foster do that? Spinks was very ackward and smart. Foster had a great jab and true one punch power at 175. In think that I may be in the minority, but this may be more of a chess match than a punchers shootout. I like Spinks may be by a split decision. I have no problem with others picking Foster because his kayos of Tiger and Quarry were near beheadings. Yet, Spinks did not trade with Qawi.... so I don't think he will with Foster either.

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    Bump

    Hawk

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    Re: BOB FOSTER VS. MICHAEL SPINKS by Lee Groves & M. Mulcahe

    Spinks could win this by either KO or decision. He had the better chin, was faster, threw more punches, definitely had the better footwork. Sorry Bob.

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    Re: BOB FOSTER VS. MICHAEL SPINKS by Lee Groves & M. Mulcahe

    Not a Spinks hater, but...Foster's damaging jabs and wrecking-ball left hooks would eventually take their toll on Mike. And I don't subscribe to the thesis that Spinks had KO power in either hand; I don't even give him the power edge over Bob at '75. Foster by TKO9.

    Kyoodle

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    Re: BOB FOSTER VS. MICHAEL SPINKS by Lee Groves & M. Mulcahe

    Bob Foster is my choice by KO within 9.

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